Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
dirac

Monday, November 5

Recommended Posts

Gay male ballet dancers talk in The New York Times Style magazine.

Quote

Chamblee is part of a new generation of dancers who are collapsing the boundaries between queerness and maleness in ballet by challenging its, and the culture’s, preconceived ideas of masculinity. They use social media, especially Instagram, to express themselves creatively and corporeally, building an audience much larger than what a company alone can bring them. Their work onstage and online rejects the idea that a male dancer must store his queerness in his locker. They see no contradiction in the serious artist who dances on ballet’s largest stages and also posts videos of himself, say, dancing on a treadmill in platform heels.

 

Share this post


Link to post

A story on the new pointe shoes made for dancers of color in mind.

Quote

But now dancers won’t have to spend time on the matching process - as dance shoe design and manufacturing company Freed of London has begun selling pointe shoes in bronze and brown in partnership with dance company Ballet Black.

 

Share this post


Link to post

A review of "Balanchine: the City Center Years" by Mary Cargill for danceviewtimes.

Quote

Miami City Ballet brought the rarely seen "Glinka Pas de Trois", an explosion of steps set as a formal exercise -- adagio, variations, and coda.  Natalie Arja, Ashley Knox, and Kleber Rebello seemed to enjoy the challenge, and challenge it was.  The opening adagio was full of balances, as the two girls swapped hands with Rebello, often while on one leg.  (Knox did have one mishap as she fell off point, but she calmly and professionally rejoined the fun.)

 

Share this post


Link to post

More reviews of "Balanchine: the City Center Years."

Observer

Quote

.... Of course New York City Ballet was there, as well as its superb orchestra and two of its conductors. Concerto Barocco fared pretty well, although its two female principals—a very thin Maria Kowroski and a too peppy Abi Stafford—don’t really look as though they’re in the same ballet. (Russell Janzen was a modest and pleasing presence.) Symphony in C was a mixed blessing, reduced to 43 dancers from the traditional 52 to fit the City Center stage. But I remember the thrill of those 52 rushing on to the stage and having to squeeze into the wings—it made for a tsunami of excitement. This diminished version was more measured: City Ballet doesn’t take big chances any longer. As for the principals, Tiler Peck’s musicality and assurance prevailed in First Movement. Sara Mearns, for me, is totally unsuited to Second—she’s all thrust and assertion, but this great adagio is about beauty and glorious phrasing. (I was spoiled by Le Clercq, Kent, Farrell.) ...............But Symphony in C is Symphony in C, and it was good to see all those thoroughbred corps dancers trying to hold everything together.

Broadway World

 

Quote

The cast was excellent all around, especially Simone Messmer as the "waltz girl." (Can I say girl?) Messmer's performances in the past have sometimes been outstanding, sometimes erratic, as if she were phoning in a performance. Not here. She was totally engaged with the music; she understood its dramatic tension and, in her own way, outlined a story of love lost. I'm not quite sure how this was accomplished; in the end, it doesn't matter. But I have not seen such a strong dramatic presence on stage in a very long time. To say she was unique is an understatement.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Sign in to follow this  
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×