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Friday, November 2

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Misty Copeland talks about appearing  on film in "The Nutcracker and the Four Realms."

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“It’s very difficult for dancers on most films on the sets because I don’t think there’s a true understanding of what we need in that space,” says Copeland, who has ballerina friends who performed in the movies “Black Swan” and “Red Sparrow.” “I know what it’s like to be on those sets as a dancer and you’re kind of just treated like everyone else, like an extra. They’ll come, say, at 2 a.m. and say, 'Get up, you’ve got to go do your fouettés!' "

 

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A review of opening night at the New York City Center's Balanchine festival by Marina Harss for DanceTabs.

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A few jitters were natural – such a showcase puts immense pressure on companies to rise to the occasion. Miami City Ballet, who opened the evening with Serenade, started off with a slight case of nerves, manifested in slips here and there. Still, the performance, led at breakneck speed by the New York City Ballet orchestra under the baton of Andrews Sill, was exciting, a blur of bluish tulle. The Miami dancers pushed through the air almost hungrily. City Ballet is assertive, stylish, and sharp; the Miamians dance with drive. And at the same time, they’re “neater” – they stay in their lines and hold their arms at the same angle. Not something City Ballet is known for, as the performance of Symphony in C attested. It’s fascinating to see the two companies side by side, like siblings with different temperaments.

Mary Cargill's review for danceviewtimes.

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Jeanette Delgado was warm and potent, if occasionally breathless, in the Russian variation and used her expressive face to haunting effect in the moving vignette where she offered her hand to her comrades.  The connection between the dancers, the music, and the choreography, which included but did not court the audience, was intensely moving and the company deserved its ovation.

 

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Francesca Hayward will appear in the movie of "Cats."

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She'll play a kitten called Victoria and will also perform a new song.

 

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Reviews of the Royal Ballet in "La Bayadere."

The Daily Telegraph

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One of the things that makes La Bayadère – Marius Petipa’s 1877 slice of romantic Orientalist hokum – so particularly lovable is that, perhaps uniquely among story ballets, the corps is the star. True, it offers a full three gold-standard showpiece for principal dancers (more of which later). But the passage during which a pin dropped in the stalls would register like a canon shot does not involve that trio at all.

The Evening Standard

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Núñez, usually the sunniest of dancers, here delivers a performance of quiet intensity; joyfully sensuous in the arms of her lover Solor (the wonderful Vadim Muntagirov), then broken and ragged after his betrayal. Osipova, meanwhile, is clearly relishing the chance to play bad — her jumps are (if possible) even bigger, her fouettés even more dazzling. And all with a malevolent glint in her eye.

Time Out

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The corps has been well drilled – and Yuhui Choe, Yasmine Naghdi and Akane Takada are exquisite as the lead Shades. This is probably ballet at its most OTT – but what a joy to watch. And this run offers a chance to see plenty of the Royal Ballet principals in the lead roles.

 

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An interview with Sergei Polunin.

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“They want to control every single part of your life,” he says of the Royal Ballet experience. “I wanted to do more. My instinct was telling me there had to be more. All I’d done was dance from being little, and I wanted more from life. I still wanted to dance, but I wanted to do films and advertisements. I wanted a creative life. I didn’t just want a classical ballet life, doing the same thing, the same dances, every day, forever.”

 

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A review of the Birmingham Royal Ballet in La Fille mal gardée by Mark Pullinger for Bachtrack.

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It’s hard to go wrong with Ashton’s sunny masterpiece and BRB fields a very decent cast. I’ve seen funnier Lise’s than Momoko Hirata’s – there’s not much pout and her “When I am married” mime is understated – but her beaming smile radiates warmth, she bourrées crisply and is as light as the yellow ribbon with which she dances. Mathias Dingman portrays Colas with happy-go-lucky ease, although his box split jumps in the Bottle Dance were a little timid. Yet he partners Hirata sensitively in the touching Fanny Elssler pas de deux (commissioned by the Australian ballerina in 1837 to excerpts from Donizetti’s sunny L’elisir d’amore).

 

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An op-ed writer for The Wall Street Journal complains that liberals made fun of his Boston Ballet T-shirt.

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It was as if there was no way I could actually love the ballet—in which visual, musical and physical art coalesces at a rarefied level of beauty, the human body twining with music in an ethereal dance of poetry.

Sometimes I’d look up the critics. They were doctors, lawyers, professors, with social media pages littered with testimonies and photos of self-ascribed wokeness, protest marches, inveighings against mansplaining.


 

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An interview with Alexandra Waterbury.

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“Dance is not the issue,” said Waterbury, who sued both Finlay and New York City Ballet. “It’s bigger institutions that are very much in it for money, very much in it for protecting an image and prolonging this lineage of something like (George) Balanchine.”

 

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A review of Washington Ballet by Sarah Kaufman in The Washington Post.

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These tests were faced with a strong sense of care and attention to detail, always gratifying to see. Yet to take up the theme of the program, mastery is another matter. With such a disparate assortment of works, in this series as well as throughout the season, is the Washington Ballet attempting to become a jack of all trades, master of none? Becoming proficient in the different approaches and dance languages of Morris, Taylor and Cunningham is a stiff challenge for a short series of performances. These dancers are working hard to meet the demands of quickly learning a mixed repertoire.

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Sergei Polunin fashion photo gallery.

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The author of the photo stories was Phil Dunlop, who was able to reflect the character of the actor in all the photos. For shooting Sergey put such thing premium brands like Louis Vuitton, Dolce & Gabbana, Boss, Tom Ford and Armani. Velvet jackets, formal trousers and casual shirt are perfectly combined in the images Polunin, who styled Catherine Hayward.

 

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A review of "Balanchine: the City Center Years" by Apollinaire Scherr in The Financial Times.

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Yet it only took the lights to dim and the curtain to rise on the opening dance for history to cast its spell. The Miami City Ballet dancers rushing from one wing, then another, in Serenade impressed on us how bodily Balanchine made this ethereal art. The relatively small City Center stage rests high enough above the orchestra seats that movement at Balanchine’s velocity and density pulls you under like a giant wave. How shocking the dance must have been on first encounter there. How startling still. Serenade suddenly seemed the choreographer’s answer to The Rite of Spring.

 

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