Jump to content
CTballetfan

Job posting for artistic director

Recommended Posts

1 hour ago, abatt said:

Whelan was at NYCB last night.  For years after her retirement she did not come to NYCB because, as she put it, she was not ready to see others dance her old roles.  I guess she's gotten over that, because over the past year she is at the Koch regularly.

I can certainly understand that feeling.

After I quit ballet (and I was not a professional) going to the ballet hurt so much that I found I couldn't for several years. I can't imagine the profound feeling of loss after spending basically your entire life as a dancer. It would certainly be an adjustment! I'm glad she does come now though.

Share this post


Link to post
16 minutes ago, Helene said:

Official news only, with source.

Ok, sorry about that.  I'll try and find an official source.  

Share this post


Link to post

There was a recent interview with Millepied who said he was a candidate but isn't interested.

Millepied, known to the general public for choreographing dances in the movie "Black Swan" where he met his wife, confirms that he was among the candidates to take over the NYCB. This company is itself shaken by the retirement of its director over 30 years Peter Martins, accused of sexual harassment before being cleared. But scalded by the experience in Paris, he is not interested: "It's the same thing: stay locked in a theater the majority of the year".

https://culturebox.francetvinfo.fr/danse/benjamin-millepied-de-retour-a-paris-j-avais-besoin-de-creer-284930

Share this post


Link to post
5 hours ago, balletforme said:

Why oh why or why so long? 

Is the board divided? Get on with it already. 

I assume that the sexting scandal delayed things. Personally I think Stafford didn’t come off particularly well, what with the revelation that he was aware of Finlay’s alcohol issues and the initial suspension that turned into a firing only after a lawsuit. If he was the top candidate prior to that, the board may have decided to go in a different direction.

Of course, I could be completely wrong and maybe they were impressed and he became a stronger candidate in their eyes. 

Share this post


Link to post
4 hours ago, FPF said:

There was a recent interview with Millepied who said he was a candidate but isn't interested.

Millepied, known to the general public for choreographing dances in the movie "Black Swan" where he met his wife, confirms that he was among the candidates to take over the NYCB. This company is itself shaken by the retirement of its director over 30 years Peter Martins, accused of sexual harassment before being cleared. But scalded by the experience in Paris, he is not interested: "It's the same thing: stay locked in a theater the majority of the year".

https://culturebox.francetvinfo.fr/danse/benjamin-millepied-de-retour-a-paris-j-avais-besoin-de-creer-284930

Thank goodness he is not a possibility IMO. Lord knows we don't need to see more of his choreography.

Share this post


Link to post
Just now, vipa said:

Thank goodness he is not a possibility IMO. Lord knows we don't need to see more of his choreography.

I was also relieved.

Share this post


Link to post
19 minutes ago, FPF said:

I was also relieved.

 

19 minutes ago, FPF said:

Thank goodness he is not a possibility IMO. Lord knows we don't need to see more of his choreography.

Makes my day.

Share this post


Link to post

I am really sick of writers like the New Yorker one bemoaning “only” fourteen male principals. At that time there were and continue to be only nine female principals. The last four promotions to principal have all been male. And the recent firings have been used to create more opportunities for men rather than women in the company. 

Share this post


Link to post
25 minutes ago, Leah said:

I am really sick of writers like the New Yorker one bemoaning “only” fourteen male principals. At that time there were and continue to be only nine female principals. The last four promotions to principal have all been male. And the recent firings have been used to create more opportunities for men rather than women in the company. 

Agreed. Crazy to think that the most recently promoted female principal was Lauren Lovette in 2015.

Share this post


Link to post
1 hour ago, yukionna4869 said:

I was hoping there would be new info, but this seems more like a recap. 

I think the piece is primarily intended as a recap – explaining the story-so-far to readers of the magazine who haven’t been following it closely, or at all. Even so, Acocella had surprisingly little to add.

Share this post


Link to post
1 hour ago, Leah said:

I am really sick of writers like the New Yorker one bemoaning “only” fourteen male principals. At that time there were and continue to be only nine female principals. The last four promotions to principal have all been male. And the recent firings have been used to create more opportunities for men rather than women in the company. 

It also skates past the fact that there are more than a few very promising talents in the junior males ranks, as well as the fact that although Finlay and Catazaro may have been "stars," as Accocella would have it, they weren't especially strong or particularly interesting dancers.

Based on the enthusiastic (and richly deserved) applause that greeted Taylor Stanley during his solo bow after yesterday's performance of Runaway, I'd hazard a guess that if NYCB has a male star right now, it's him. 

Share this post


Link to post
2 hours ago, Kathleen O'Connell said:

It also skates past the fact that there are more than a few very promising talents in the junior males ranks, as well as the fact that although Finlay and Catazaro may have been "stars," as Accocella would have it, they weren't especially strong or particularly interesting dancers.

To her credit, Acocella referred only to Finlay and Ramasar as "stars":

Quote

Now, in one fell swoop, it lost three, and two of them, Ramasar and Finlay, were stars.

I suppose, in a rather broad sense, they both were — though perhaps only one of them primarily for the strength and interest of his dancing.

Edited by nanushka

Share this post


Link to post
25 minutes ago, nanushka said:

To her credit, Acocella referred only to Finlay and Ramasar as "stars":

I suppose, in a rather broad sense, they both were — though perhaps only one of them primarily for the strength and interest of his dancing.

Ah - right you are! I should have checked the text again before I posted.

Well, the company certainly seemed to have tried its darndest to make a star out of Finlay from the get-go, which perhaps served its own interests more than his. 

Share this post


Link to post
14 hours ago, Leah said:

I am really sick of writers like the New Yorker one bemoaning “only” fourteen male principals. At that time there were and continue to be only nine female principals. The last four promotions to principal have all been male. And the recent firings have been used to create more opportunities for men rather than women in the company. 

Well said, Leah

Edited by Jacqueline

Share this post


Link to post

I disliked the entire article. I won't go into every point but, I've been a NYCB fan for a long time - starting with the Balanchine years. The company could have crumbled after Balanchine. I was doubtful of Martins' leadership at first, in fact for a number of years, but he kept the company going, IMO he grew into the job and at this point it is filled with incredible dancers that he chose. The depth of talent is amazing.  I'm not denying that there have been big mistakes but the company, at this point, the company is amazing.

I don't want to re-hash the good and bad of Martins, but the idea that the end of the his Sleeping Beauty has to mean that people should get over Balanchine and move on is absurd to me.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
1 hour ago, vipa said:

I don't want to re-hash the good and bad of Martins, but the idea that the end of the his Sleeping Beauty has to mean that people should get over Balanchine and move on is absurd to me.

It's pretty much a quote of Napoleon crowning himself without religious consecration, ie, his legitimacy was based entirely on his own talents, not bestowed by anyone. Since this wasn't the original ending or intention, I think the choice for that ending was pretty clear.

In similar tales, like the Magic Flute, where a foreigner marries into the family after proving himself, the power is transferred to the couple to renew the kingdom.  The couple doesn't seize the crown.

Share this post


Link to post

That was the best article Acocella wrote!  Right to the point and good journalism wording .  In most of her writings I have found her to be too dry--but she hit this one out of the ballpark

Share this post


Link to post

I thought the article was a good summary of what happened at City Ballet – and almost a roll call of many of the discussion points here at Ballet Alert. What struck me as a wrong note was her attempt at assessing Balanchine's status in the arts (which always for some reason dance writers seem to need to defend and polish), as  "a kind of poetic force that made people, when they saw his ballets, think about their lives differently, more seriously". That seemed subjective and very personal – almost like a religious conversion – and out of character with the tone of the rest of the piece. Balanchine was a fairly modest man, and instead of comparing himself to Tolstoy, as Acocella does, he might have said ETA Hoffmann or Gogol. (And maybe Hugo Wolf instead of Bach.)

Share this post


Link to post
2 hours ago, Quiggin said:

I thought the article was a good summary of what happened at City Ballet – and almost a roll call of many of the discussion points here at Ballet Alert. What struck me as a wrong note was her attempt at assessing Balanchine's status in the arts (which always for some reason dance writers seem to need to defend and polish), as  "a kind of poetic force that made people, when they saw his ballets, think about their lives differently, more seriously". That seemed subjective and very personal – almost like a religious conversion – and out of character with the tone of the rest of the piece. Balanchine was a fairly modest man, and instead of comparing himself to Tolstoy, as Acocella does, he might have said ETA Hoffmann or Gogol. (And maybe Hugo Wolf instead of Bach.)

I disagree. That momentary assessment of Balanchine's status was for the purpose of making a point about Martins — that was the topic of the paragraph. It was not gratuitous, not a mere "seeming to need" to do something.

Acocella has long inhabited the NYC dance world, so her comment about what Balanchine's ballets "made people...think about" struck me as more reportorial than subjective and personal — i.e. I would imagine that she has talked with innumerable dance-goers, and that many have expressed the sorts of sentiments that led her to that overall characterization. (None of them need have put it in those particular terms, of course.) Heck, every time NYCB does an all-Balanchine program, I feel like this very board gets posts describing his work as a balm for the soul. And thinking differently, more seriously, about one's life for a time would hardly require anything like religious conversion.

As for Tolstoy and Bach, her point was not that Balanchine would compare himself to them; rather, she was comparing him to them. Balanchine's own degree of modesty doesn't seem particularly relevant to me.

(Also, Hoffmann lived to age 46, Gogol to age 42, Wolf to age 42 as well; none really fit Acocella's description of "a long career [and] an enormous range.")

Edited by nanushka

Share this post


Link to post
4 hours ago, nanushka said:

I disagree. That momentary assessment of Balanchine's status was for the purpose of making a point about Martins — that was the topic of the paragraph...

(Also, Hoffmann lived to age 46, Gogol to age 42, Wolf to age 42 as well; none really fit Acocella's description of "a long career [and] an enormous range.")

I think Joan Acocella could have said that Balanchine was a giant of 20th century ballet, much as Bach was for music in the 18th, which to me would have been more in keeping with relatively straight reportage of the rest of the piece – and leave it at that.

 As far a Gogol's range, I think it was Doestovsky who said "we all came out of Gogol's Overcoat." I was also thinking of Wolf's musicality, the conterpoint of singer and pianist, the unique flavor of his work – somewhat like the odd flavor of the slow movement of Divertimento #15 (being performed here in SF this week), with its strange stop and go step patterns and rather bizarre overhead lifts. In general I was trying to link Balanchine with artists of some modesty and unique world view, rather than the biggest and best. It is odd though that Balanchine's stature often seems to have to be justified by dance writers whereas someone like Merce Cunningham's doesn't.

Share this post


Link to post
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...