Jump to content
ABT Fan

ABT 2019 Met Season

Recommended Posts

Posted (edited)
3 hours ago, Golden Idol said:

If we won't be seeing Paquita at ABT (conspicuously missing from their repertoire for decades now), at least we'll be seeing the Mariinsky's reconstruction at the Kennedy Center in October.

I'm really looking forward to the Mariinsky Paquita but I think "reconstruction" is the wrong word for what they are bringing. As has been discussed  on the Mariinsky thread, the first two acts are a new ballet with a new libretto--all prepared by Yuri Smekalov.  As best I can tell, it does try to be "in the spirit of" nineteenth-century ballet and its conventions.  Others who post here likely have seen it and can say more about it -- though presumably on one of the Mariinsky threads where it is being discussed.

Based on video I would say Ratmansky's production for Munich though fascinating for me as a ballet fan is maybe not an obvious choice for ABT and its audience, but it was, at any rate, a genuine attempt at reconstruction of the Petipa choreography based on the notations and danced according to Ratmansky's vision of nineteenth-century style/technique.

I personally would love to see ABT dance the Grand pas from Paquita--and stylistically sensitive but still 21st-century scale dancing would be fine with me in an "act" designed to be a gala celebration as it certainly came to be!-- and it would serve the additional purpose of giving some challenging featured roles to a slew of dancers including soloists who could definitely use the experience.

Edited by Drew
Grammar

Share this post


Link to post
Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, nanushka said:

I can sympathize with the feelings of Ratmansky overload in general, but Sleeping Beauty and Harlequinade, as reconstructions, seem to me Petipa ballets first and foremost, not Ratmansky ballets.

Are there ways in which those two seem significantly similar to, say, Whipped Cream or Ratmansky's Nutcracker or others of his, such that they contribute to the overall fatigue?

For me personally it's not that the Petipa reconstructions are similar to Ratmansky's original works--I have problems with the individual ballets and the frequency with which they're performed. Whipped Cream felt like it was for children; I saw it twice and would not go again. (I also kind of hate the waltz of the whipped cream tufts.) Harlequinade had too much mime, and too much children dancing. I go to the ballet for sweeping grandeur, lightning-fast petite allegro, bravura dancing--there's only so much cuteness I can take. Seeing these two ballets on the schedule over and over again gets a little annoying.

I haven't seen his Sleeping Beauty so I can't comment definitively, but wasn't the consensus that it also was mime-heavy?

Ratmansky's Nutcracker, on the other hand, hasn't been performed in New York in awhile. I'd love to see that back, as it is heavy on dancing. Specifically, adults dancing.

Edited by mille-feuille

Share this post


Link to post
2 hours ago, nysusan said:

 

And as to exciting debuts in Swan Lake - I haven't seen Shevchenko yet (hoping to see her this season, another compromise since she's dancing with Whiteside) but I would definitely not consider Teuscher's O/O exciting. I thought she showed a lot of promise in her debut but last year with Stearns she was just awful. Her Odette had a stiff back, low arabesques, unstretched and unheld positions and was boring, boring, boring!

I hope you get to see Shevchenko's O/O this year as she is positively breathtaking.  And I thought Whiteside partnered her well and did himself proud.

I didn't see Teuscher's Swan Lake last year.  I saw her debut of the role two years ago, and like you, I thought she showed great promise.  Having said that, I felt she needed a stronger partner.  I’m absolutely thrilled that she’s going to dance SL with Bell this year, especially since they were so beautiful in R&J last season. 

Share this post


Link to post
36 minutes ago, mille-feuille said:

For me personally it's not that the Petipa reconstructions are similar to Ratmansky's original works--I have problems with the individual ballets and the frequency with which they're performed. Whipped Cream felt like it was for children; I saw it twice and would not go again. (I also kind of hate the waltz of the whipped cream tufts.) Harlequinade had too much mime, and too much children dancing. I go to the ballet for sweeping grandeur, lightning-fast petite allegro, bravura dancing--there's only so much cuteness I can take. Seeing these two ballets on the schedule over and over again gets a little annoying.

I haven't seen his Sleeping Beauty so I can't comment definitively, but wasn't the consensus that it also was mime-heavy?

Ratmansky's Nutcracker, on the other hand, hasn't been performed in New York in awhile. I'd love to see that back, as it is heavy on dancing. Specifically, adults dancing.

This definitely makes more sense to me than the more general "too much Ratmansky" idea.

I've quite enjoyed Whipped Cream the three times I've seen it, but I don't think it needed to come back for a third year in a row, and I'm skipping it this year.

I felt exactly the same about Harlequinade. Not enough good non-corps dancing.

I don't recall that being a particular criticism of his Sleeping Beauty reconstruction — and I don't recall it having any more mime than most typical "after Petipa" productions — though there were definitely divisions in its reception here on BA. (Thus, I wouldn't say there was a "consensus" in either direction.) I quite like it and definitely look forward to seeing it again.

And I, too, would love to see his Nutcracker back in NYC with some regularity, but I doubt that would happen any time soon.

Share this post


Link to post
3 hours ago, nysusan said:

 

I agree with you 100%! I did renew my subscription so I will be going, but it was quite a challenge to find performances I wanted to go to. Almost everything was a compromise - a ballet I wasn't crazy about to see a specific dancer, one dancer I loved paired with another I dislike.  And there is way too much Ratmansky. I like him but come on - Ratmansky trio, his Harlequinade, Whipped Cream and  Sleeping Beauty. Four programs in an 8 week season? Its just too much.

And as to exciting debuts in Swan Lake - I haven't seen Shevchenko yet (hoping to see her this season, another compromise since she's dancing with Whiteside) but I would definitely not consider Teuscher's O/O exciting. I thought she showed a lot of promise in her debut but last year with Stearns she was just awful. Her Odette had a stiff back, low arabesques, unstretched and unheld positions and was boring, boring, boring!

I was going to weigh in similarly, nysusan, but you saved me the trouble, as I agree with everything you wrote, down to the final exclamation points.

 

Share this post


Link to post

Casting has been posted for some of the Tharp Trio:

In the Upper Room

Thursday/Friday/Saturday night - Devon Teuscher, Cassandra Trenary, Skylar Brandt, Aran Bell, Herman Cornejo, Blaine Hoven, Isabella Boylston, Joo Won Ahn

Saturday matinee/Monday - Stephanie Williams, Catherine Hurlin, Wanyue Qiao, Calvin Royal III, Cory Stearns, Duncan Lyle, Christine Shevchenko, Thomas Forster

Deuce Coupe

Thursday/Friday/Saturday night - Christine Shevchenko, Isabella Boylston, Misty Copeland, Stella Abrera, James Whiteside, Calvin Royal III

Saturday matinee/Monday - TBA

Brahms/Haydn variations

TBA (all performances)

Share this post


Link to post

On Sarah Lane’s Instagram story, she posted a shot of counts for the Jane Eyre “wedding scene”. What part could she be playing at the wedding? I can only imagine some sort of corps part since none of the other major female characters in the book were at Jane’s wedding. 

Share this post


Link to post
5 minutes ago, Fleurfairy said:

On Sarah Lane’s Instagram story, she posted a shot of counts for the Jane Eyre “wedding scene”. What part could she be playing at the wedding? I can only imagine some sort of corps part since none of the other major female characters in the book were at Jane’s wedding. 

Perhaps, against all odds, she is learning the role of Jane? Either as an understudy, or sometime down the road?

Share this post


Link to post
2 hours ago, angelica said:

Perhaps, against all odds, she is learning the role of Jane? Either as an understudy, or sometime down the road?

Or, she's learning whatever role Cassandra Trenary (I believe, I could be wrong) plays in the trailer-- she appears briefly through the doorway: 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Posted (edited)

Looks like that character is Bertha. In the book she makes her first appearance right after the wedding so in the ballet she could conceivably take part in the wedding scene.

Edited by Leah

Share this post


Link to post
11 hours ago, Fleurfairy said:

On Sarah Lane’s Instagram story, she posted a shot of counts for the Jane Eyre “wedding scene”. What part could she be playing at the wedding? I can only imagine some sort of corps part since none of the other major female characters in the book were at Jane’s wedding. 

As we know from other book-to-ballets, an epic book would require the condensing of many events into fewer, larger scenes and it is possible that Adele, Mrs Fairfax, Grace, Bertha, Blanche, among others appear at the wedding. We also have no idea at this point the choreographic weight the choreographer has prescribed to anyone in the novel. 

It seems quite strange to assume that a principal could only be doing a corps role based on the little information we have about the ballet. 

Share this post


Link to post

Nor from what I have read does Marston take a literal minded approach to her literary adaptations.

Share this post


Link to post

If you are looking forward to the upcoming Lane/Cornejo performances of "Sleeping Beauty" this spring as much as I am, hurry over to Sarah Lane's Instagram stories, where she has posted some rehearsal footage of her Rose adagio (footage should disappear sometime Sunday pm).  If she remains as relaxed and technically strong in July, we will be treated to two more performances of her amazing and gorgeous Aurora. 

Share this post


Link to post
On 4/26/2019 at 8:07 PM, Fleurfairy said:

On Sarah Lane’s Instagram story, she posted a shot of counts for the Jane Eyre “wedding scene”. What part could she be playing at the wedding? I can only imagine some sort of corps part since none of the other major female characters in the book were at Jane’s wedding. 

Lane posted her schedule on FB and IG. She's playing Mrs. Fairfax.

It's been a while since I read the book. She's Rochester's housekeeper, right?

Share this post


Link to post
14 hours ago, LadyBubbles said:

Lane posted her schedule on FB and IG. She's playing Mrs. Fairfax.

It's been a while since I read the book. She's Rochester's housekeeper, right?

Yes, that's correct. 

Share this post


Link to post

I received an e-mail from ABT with discount codes for certain performances.  Details below:

Give Mom the Gift of Dance this Mother’s Day

For a limited time only, purchase Orchestra tickets at 25% off the regular price for select performances.
 
Use the promo code ABTMoms to receive 25% off. This offer expires May 13.
Visit the Metropolitan Opera House Opera Box Office or call 212-362-6000 to order. *Tickets are subject to availability

ABT Mother’s Day Discount Performances:
 
HARLEQUINADE
Tuesday, May 14
Wednesday, May 15
Thursday, May 16
Friday, May 17
Saturday, May 18
 
WHIPPED CREAM
Friday, May 24
Saturday, May 25 matinee
Monday, May 27
Tuesday, May 28
Wednesday, May 29

THE SLEEPING BEAUTY
Monday, July 1
Tuesday, July 2
Wednesday, July 3
Thursday, July 4 matinee
Friday, July 5
Saturday, July 6

Share this post


Link to post
Posted (edited)

Question about Met seating:

In an attempt to change up where I usually sit and to save some money, I'm thinking about grabbing a Grand Tier box seat for a performance or two. Not the partial view ones, but one of the seats in the first row (i.e. Box 34-2 or Box 34-3) which according to the seating chart should be full view. Has anyone ever sat here for a ballet? What is the view like? Is it actually full view? Will I still be able to see facial expressions without opera glasses or is this too high and on the side? I would choose this seat for something like Tharp Trio or the Ratmansky Trio, not one my must-see's (i.e. Lane's Manon).

Any advice would be appreciated!

Edited by ABT Fan

Share this post


Link to post
Posted (edited)

Even though the Met lists some Grand Tier box seats as full view, they are in my experience all partial view seats.  I used to sit in the Grand tier box furthest from the stage, in the front row of the box. I stopped sitting there because  I got tired of people leaning  their heads and  torsos over the sides of the box  to improve their view.  I also couldn't stand people in the box  moving their chairs around in the box so that they were practically sitting in my lap in order to jockey for a better view.  Just my personal opinion, but I would never sit in those boxes again for ballet.  For opera, where the visual details aren't so important, the boxes are less problematic.

Just my two cents.

Edited by abatt

Share this post


Link to post
Posted (edited)

I agree with abatt about the boxes.  Not only do people move their chairs around which affects everyone else in the box, but you'll probably wind up with a stiff neck trying to see around people who move their chairs around or crane their necks.  That's been my experience. They are awful seats, and I would only consider them if they were the only seats available for a sold out ballet.

And no, you will not be able to see facial expressions from that distance without opera glasses.

Edited by NinaFan

Share this post


Link to post

Thank you, abatt and NinaFan. I'm going to skip it!

Share this post


Link to post

We have discussed seating at the Met repeatedly. Some of it is personal preference. I like the Grand Tier, as you have an unobstructed view and the rows are steeply laddered, so you don't have a head-in-front problem. But you're so far away - yuk. 

I hate the orchestra -- the only thing I consider is side orchestra on the aisle, which gives you an unobstructed view without heads, even pretty far back. But they're hard to come by. Everything else in orchestra is at high-risk of heads blocking views, especially if you're on the short side.

I actually like the parterre boxes near the stage when I'm seeing a lot of performances in other seating of the same ballet/cast. You have an obstructed view of the back corner, so you have to be careful about which side (the balcony for R&J, the grave for Giselle, etc.). The  second row is unacceptable in all circumstances. It's fun to see them up close and even a little into the wings, but you have to know what you're losing and putting up with when you pick those tickets.

Share this post


Link to post

I agree with California that the regular rows in Grand Tier are great for their unobstructed views, however they are further away from the stage than I like.  I usually sit in the Orchestra, but since I'm short I have to contend with heads in my way as California noted.   If only the MET had the Koch sight lines! 

Share this post


Link to post

From the company:

CASTING ANNOUNCED FOR FIRST TWO WEEKS OF AMERICAN BALLET THEATRE’S 2019 SPRING SEASON AT METROPOLITAN OPERA HOUSE

World Premiere of Alexei Ratmansky’s The SeasonsScheduled for Spring Gala, Monday, May 20 at 6:30 P.M.

Casting for the first two weeks of American Ballet Theatre’s 2019 Spring Season at the Metropolitan Opera House was announced today by Artistic Director Kevin McKenzie.

The season will begin with eight performances of Alexei Ratmansky’sHarlequinade, beginning Monday, May 13, with Isabella Boylston, James Whiteside, Stella Abrera and Thomas Forster in the leading roles. The performance on Tuesday, May 14, will feature New York debuts by Carlos Gonzalez (Harlequin), Devon Teuscher (Pierrette) and Calvin Royal III (Pierrot). Tyler Maloney will dance the role of Harlequin for the first time in New York at the matinee on Wednesday, May 15. This production ofHarlequinade received its World Premiere by American Ballet Theatre on June 4, 2018, led by Isabella Boylston (Columbine), James Whiteside (Harlequin), Gillian Murphy (Pierrette) and Thomas Forster (Pierrot). A comic ballet in two acts, Harlequinade is set to music by Riccardo Drigo and first premiered in 1900 in St. Petersburg, Russia. Ratmansky’s Harlequinade features sets and costumes by Robert Perdziola and lighting by Brad Fields.

The 2019 Spring Gala on Monday, May 20 at 6:30 P.M., paying tribute to the 10thAnniversary year of Alexei Ratmansky as ABT Artist in Residence, will feature the choreographer’s 2016 work Serenade after Plato’s Symposium and this Spring’s World Premiere of The Seasons. Serenade after Plato’s Symposium is set to music by Leonard Bernstein and features scenery and costumes by Jérôme Kaplan and lighting by Brad Fields. The ballet will be danced by Herman Cornejo, Alexandre Hammoudi, Thomas Forster, Calvin Royal III, Gabe Stone Shayer, Daniil Simkin, Joseph Gorak and Devon Teuscher.

The World Premiere of The Seasons will be led by Aran Bell, Hee Seo, Katherine Williams, Catherine Hurlin, Luciana Paris, James Whiteside, Sarah Lane, Skylar Brandt, Isabella Boylston, Blaine Hoven, Arron Scott, Tyler Maloney, Cassandra Trenary and Calvin Royal III. Set to the score by Alexander Glazunov, The Seasons features sets and costumes designed by Robert Perdziola and lighting by Mark Stanley.

The second week of the Spring season will continue with four performances of an all-Ratmansky program of repertory works, May 21–23. In addition to The Seasons, the Ratmansky Trio will include Songs of Bukovina (2017) and On the Dnieper (2009).

Joo Won Ahn, Devon Teuscher, Zhong-Jing Fang, April Giangeruso, Betsy McBride, Thomas Forster, Stella Abrera, Herman Cornejo, Gabe Stone Shayer, Jonathan Klein, Catherine Hurlin and Blaine Hoven will debut in The Seasons on Tuesday, May 21.Songs of Bukovina, with Isabella Boylston and Blaine Hoven leading the opening night cast, is set to music by Leonid Desyatnikov and features costumes by Moritz Junge and lighting by Brad Fields. The ballet was given its World Premiere on October 18, 2017 at the David H. Koch Theater in New York, performed by Christine Shevchenko and Calvin Royal III, as well as April Giangeruso, Lauren Post, Katherine Williams, Stephanie Williams, Marshall Whiteley, Joo Won Ahn, Duncan Lyle and Patrick Frenette.

The May 21 cast of On the Dnieper will be led by Hee Seo as Natalia with debuts by Cory Stearns as Sergei, Christine Shevchenko as Olga and James Whiteside as Olga’s Fiancé. The matinee on Wednesday, May 22 will feature debuts by Thomas Forster (Sergei), Devon Teuscher (Natalia) and Catherine Hurlin (Olga). On the Dnieper, set to a score of the same name by Sergei Prokofiev, has scenery by Simon Pastukh, costumes by Galina Solovyeva, lighting by Brad Fields and projections by Wendall K. Harrington. Ratmansky’s production of On the Dnieper received its World Premiere on June 1, 2009 at the Metropolitan Opera House, performed by Veronika Part (Natalia), Marcelo Gomes (Sergei), Paloma Herrera (Olga) and David Hallberg (Olga’s Fiancé). Prokofiev’s score for On the Dnieper was originally commissioned by the Paris Opera, and the ballet received its World Premiere in 1932 by the Paris Opera Ballet. On the Dnieper was last performed by ABT in 2010.

The second week will conclude with three performances of Whipped Cream, beginning Friday, May 24, led by Daniil Simkin as The Boy, Stella Abrera as Princess Tea Flower, Calvin Royal III as Prince Coffee and Sarah Lane as Princess Praline. Tyler Maloney will make his New York debut as The Boy at the matinee on Saturday, May 25. Choreographed by Alexei Ratmansky, the ballet features scenery and costumes by artist Mark Ryden and lighting by Brad Fields. Whipped Cream, with a libretto and score by Richard Strauss, is based on the two-act ballet originally created as Schlagobers, which premiered at the Vienna State Opera in 1924. Ratmansky’s production received its World Premiere by ABT on March 15, 2017 at Segerstrom Center for the Arts in Costa Mesa, California danced by Daniil Simkin (The Boy), Stella Abrera (Princess Tea Flower), David Hallberg (Prince Coffee) and Sarah Lane (Princess Praline).

Tickets for American Ballet Theatre’s 2019 Metropolitan Opera House season, beginning at $25, are available online, at the Met box office or by phone at 212-362-6000. The Metropolitan Opera House is located on Broadway between 64th and 65th streets in New York City. For more information, visit ABT’s website at www.abt.org.

Complete casting follows.

Leadership support for Harlequinade, part of The Ratmansky Project, has been generously provided by the Blavatnik Family Foundation and The Marjorie S. Isaac/Irving H. Isaac Fund.

On the Dnieper is generously sponsored by Leila and Mickey Straus and through an endowed gift from The Toni and Martin Sosnoff New Works Fund.

Leadership support for The Ratmansky Project has been provided by Avery and Andrew F. Barth, the Blavatnik Family Foundation, Mr. and Mrs. Hamilton E. James, and The Ted and Mary Jo Shen Charitable Gift Fund. Additional support has been provided by Dr. Joan Taub Ades, Linda Allard, Sarah Arison, Steven Backes, Lisa and Dick Cashin, Mark Casey and Carrie Gaiser Casey, The Susan and Leonard Feinstein Foundation, Linda and Martin Fell, Vicki Netter Fitzgerald, William J. Gillespie, Brian J. Heidtke, The Marjorie S. Isaac/Irving H. Isaac Fund, Howard S. Paley, Pearl T. Maxim Trust, Lloyd E. Rigler – Lawrence E. Deutsch Foundation, Bernard L. Schwartz, John Leland Sills and Elizabeth Papadopoulos-Sills, Melissa A. Smith, The H. Russell Smith Foundation/Stewart R. Smith and Robin A. Ferracone, The Toni and Martin Sosnoff Foundation, Sutton Stracke, and Sedgwick Ward. Leadership support for Whipped Cream, part of The Ratmansky Project, has been generously provided by the Blavatnik Family Foundation and the Lloyd E. Rigler - Lawrence A. Deutsch Foundation.

American Airlines is the Official Airline of American Ballet Theatre.

ABT is supported, in part, with public funds from the National Endowment for the Arts; the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature; and the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs, in partnership with the City Council.

Follow American Ballet Theatre on Twitter at https://twitter.com/ABTBalleton Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/AmericanBalletTheatre
on Youtube at https://www.youtube.com/user/ABTBalletTheatre
or on Instagram at https://www.instagram.com/abtofficial/?hl=en

Share this post


Link to post

Casting:

 

154857680_ScreenShot2019-05-07at2_51_38PM.thumb.png.cc58f8e4aa5c8400d65e87b90a39c2ef.png1910454503_ScreenShot2019-05-07at2_51_51PM.thumb.png.0326d8c593e76d8244ecb62df50eab52.png1514281258_ScreenShot2019-05-07at2_52_05PM.thumb.png.bdc5ade3603d0098ea4edea376587b21.png1120068727_ScreenShot2019-05-07at2_52_19PM.thumb.png.f44dc763a6a2b451cf6aa5cb7e355fe0.png765712230_ScreenShot2019-05-07at2_52_30PM.thumb.png.5649d020eaaf6edfa0ee1ecb90b352ba.png

Share this post


Link to post
On ‎4‎/‎25‎/‎2019 at 5:52 PM, RUKen said:

Casting has been posted for some of the Tharp Trio:

In the Upper Room

Thursday/Friday/Saturday night - Devon Teuscher, Cassandra Trenary, Skylar Brandt, Aran Bell, Herman Cornejo, Blaine Hoven, Isabella Boylston, Joo Won Ahn

Saturday matinee/Monday - Stephanie Williams, Catherine Hurlin, Wanyue Qiao, Calvin Royal III, Cory Stearns, Duncan Lyle, Christine Shevchenko, Thomas Forster

Deuce Coupe

Thursday/Friday/Saturday night - Christine Shevchenko, Isabella Boylston, Misty Copeland, Stella Abrera, James Whiteside, Calvin Royal III

Saturday matinee/Monday - TBA

Brahms/Haydn variations

TBA (all performances)

The Deuce Coupe cast for the Saturday matinee and Monday evening performances has now been posted:

Katherine Williams, Cassandra Trenary, Luciana Paris, Stella Abrera, James Whiteside, Calvin Royal III

There are still no casts posted for Brahms/Haydn variations.

Share this post


Link to post
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...