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cubanmiamiboy

Who rules today?

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35 minutes ago, Meow said:

I do not have the extensive knowledge and history of others on this forum, so I cannot really answer the topic question, but I am glad to see Obraztsova mentioned.  When I think of a "complete" ballerina, I do not look for someone who excels equally in everything.  I look for someone who is sublime in much and excellent in all.  I believe she is that.  I also look for someone who is never awkward or unsure in the management of her limbs, light in movement, has body positions that appear harmonious and fluid, and it neither wooden nor overly affected in acting or stage manner.  To me she is all of these.  I have not found all of these qualities in some other ballerinas mentioned, who often receive more attention from management and who have much merit also.  I disagree that she does not have the dramatic acting ability for many classical roles, and I do not think long limbs are necessary; it it how one uses what one has.  I do not understand how she is not more used at the Bolshoi.  I also think Cojocaru ranks highly and is exceptional. 

I'd just like to pick up the thread of dramatic acting ability in Obrazstova. When she danced R&J with Cornejo a couple of years ago, I was quite sure that right after the performance they were going to run off to City Hall ASAP and seal the deal.

 

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On 5/4/2018 at 3:41 AM, Laurent said:

While talking about "hype", Olga Smirnova may have been the most heavily promoted and hyped dancer in living memory. It took her an enormous effort to live up to that hype as she is most definitely not a naturally born dancer. From the very beginning her other qualities were far outweighing her ability to harmoniously move her limbs...”

"The era of Vishneva/Lopatkina/Zakharova" existed, I think, only for Russian expatriates writing on various ballet fora. I am not sure how much either one of them will be remembered, say, in 30 years.”

I certainly would not put Ms. Smirnova in the same gangly category of the young Alina Somova - who Mr.Vaziev himself prematurely promoted to principal.  I fault Ms. Smirnova for the dearth of acting skills (a must at Bolshoi)  but I do not find her ungraceful or unmusical.  

Edited by Jayne

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On 5/2/2018 at 7:41 AM, Fleurdelis said:

I agree with the notion that Smirnova right now is one of the best, if not the best ballerina in the world today. To me the last 15 years were clearly the era of Vishneva/Lopatkina/Zakharova, and Smirnova is their heir apparent as they have finished or are close to finishing their careers. I also see Cojocaru in a class of her own, incredible combination of  technique and acting ability, plus some magical inner glow that adds a special beauty to her dancing. But not enough of a diva quality to truly rule the ballet world.  Osipova - I recognize her absolute uniqueness and impact, but she comes short on gracefulness and finesse that a ballerina should have. Her physique is both a blessing and a curse, her technique and jumps are unorthodox and unequalled in the history of dance, but she does not have the fine form and lines, which is what for me defines a ballerina, as opposed to a broader concept of a dancer. Lacarra - I find her absolutely breathtaking, unless she dances the classics, where her style is very, hmmmm, peculiar. Yuan Yuan Tan - also in a class of her own, but I saw too little of her and do not know how she dances classical roles. Krysanova -  among the best ever in terms of classical technique and excellent in allegro roles, but does not have the adagio dimension and that ravishing bigger-than-life quality to be considered a generational ballerina. Semionova - for a long time I viewed her as potentially THE BALLERINA of her generation, but her career sort of fizzled after her departure from Berlin, I think it was a major mistake that distracted her and threw her off her path. Obraztsova - does not have the long limbs and the dramatic acting ability to be compelling in half the classical roles: Swan, Giselle, Bayadere. French ballerinas do not travel much, so I can't tell if there has been anyone there approaching anything of Sylvie Guillem's stature. There may be some great ballerinas in Japan, but once again I can't tell, because they do not travel much. I 1am hoping that Alena Kovaleva will redefine the art and prove that very tall ballerinas can too rule the ballet world, though I am beginning to get a bit worried about the trajectory of her development. I am very curious to hear about any other 18-22 year olds who may be destined for greatness these days.

As for the men, to me it has all been about Hallberg and Ivan Vasilyev, two antipodes who have reached the pinnacles of their respective emplois. But I keep hoping that that Baryshnikov and Vladimir Vasilyev somehow chance upon a fountain of youth, they would be just as magnificent by today's standards as they were during their dancing times. Polunin? Take away his bad boy image and the rock star hype surrounding him, and you are left with an example of good English schooling and often sloppy partnership. Not nearly enough for me, though almost all my friends completely lose their minds over him.

Based on hype alone, then Osipova, Polunin and Vasilyev are ahead of the rest. Sorry if I failed to mention anyone else I should have. 

 

You mentioned a key point vital for this discussion, which is how international are or aren't this dancers. From what one can gather in biographies and autobiographies, one key element for the most famous, generation- defining dancers of the past to have come down in history as such wasn't sometimes a superb technique, but rather an ample exposure to transcontinental audiences, companies, dancing styles and choreographers. I'm basically thinking of Danilova and Lifar...who, even if according to many of her peers were not exactly amazing technicians, were able to explore an ample array of the dancing spectrum to a vast international audience....and for a long time-( I believe longevity plays a VERY important role too). Others who were great technicians also benefited from this same international career in a variety of styles-( Markova, Alonso, Nureyev). Hence, Peck is in a great disadvantage with, let's say, Osipova.

Edited by cubanmiamiboy

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No one has mentioned Nina Ananashvili, who I believe was the greatest dancer of her generation.

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34 minutes ago, angelica said:

No one has mentioned Nina Ananashvili, who I believe was the greatest dancer of her generation.

You are so right.

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1 hour ago, angelica said:

No one has mentioned Nina Ananashvili, who I believe was the greatest dancer of her generation.

Being the greatest of a generation is a big statement. I can't know what to say. Suzanne Farrell was one of the greatest artists I've ever seen in any field. Did she "rule"? I don't know how to begin to answer that question.

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34 minutes ago, vipa said:

Being the greatest of a generation is a big statement. I can't know what to say. Suzanne Farrell was one of the greatest artists I've ever seen in any field. Did she "rule"? I don't know how to begin to answer that question.

Well....Farrell definitely ruled in NYC. Now..at the same time there were other dancers out there from her generation who probably had a more international exposure-(which is probably the same  situation with Peck today). Back in the 60's, 70's, early 80's Soviet ballerinas were still pretty much enclosed, and hence didn't have the opportunity to become international rulers. Great Cuban ballerinas were dancing, but sadly....very few saw them.  If I were to mention names from that generation I would give Fracci and Makarova-(even though I believe Sizova or Komleva were superior).

Nina, yes... definitely a ruler, but she has retired already. I'm trying to get those from today-today. 

Edited by cubanmiamiboy

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7 hours ago, cubanmiamiboy said:

Great Cuban ballerinas were dancing, but sadly....very few saw them

Would appreciate hearing your view on Adiarys Almeida today. Never saw her live, missed seeing her when she danced Kitri at the Kremlin Festival last year when I was there but had already booked something else ..... sigh !

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-R9fo4cKgNY

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DOWhG1wtJdE

 

Edited by mnacenani
factual correction x 2

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12 hours ago, mnacenani said:

Would appreciate hearing your view on Adiarys Almeida today. Never saw her live, missed seeing her when she danced Kitri at the Kremlin Festival last year when I was there but had already booked something else ..... sigh !

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-R9fo4cKgNY

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DOWhG1wtJdE

 

Your typical Cuban ballerina, pretty much in the lines of Xiomara Reyes or Viengsay Valdes. Short, legs of steel, great turner, fouettes and pirouettes for ages... always on spot...but not within the general likeness of current elongated, willowy Russian prototype.

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I would have to say Sarah Lamb of The Royal. I think she can do anything and everything. 

Edited by Fleurfairy

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How about Marianela Nuñez...? Is she enough international ...? enough versatile...? Young enough to be a current  technical competition of Osipova or Peck...?

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I have had the opportunity to watch some of The Royal Ballet Principals and Soloists during my recent stay in London and I have to say there is some AMAZING talent in that company but sadly those dancers have no international exposure at all and are unknown outside the UK. I can only hope that through the worldwide cinema relay those dancers will also become known internationally. The partnership between two amazing and very popular dancers, Principal ballerina Yasmine Naghdi and First Soloist Matthew Ball, ( as seen on the Royal Ballet advertising poster for international screening in 2019) will hopefully start to change that. https://www.roh.org.uk/showings/romeo-and-juliet-live-2019

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8 minutes ago, Katia Kapustin said:

I have had the opportunity to watch some of The Royal Ballet Principals and Soloists during my recent stay in London and I have to say there is some AMAZING talent in that company but sadly those dancers have no international exposure at all and are unknown outside the UK. I can only hope that through the worldwide cinema relay those dancers will also become known internationally. The partnership between two amazing and very popular dancers, Principal ballerina Yasmine Naghdi and First Soloist Matthew Ball, ( as seen on the Royal Ballet advertising poster for international screening in 2019) will hopefully start to change that. https://www.roh.org.uk/showings/romeo-and-juliet-live-2019

Talent shows within 10 seconds. Am sure Naghdi has loads of it, not so sure about Ball but will keep an open mind.

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