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Which dancer do you most wish you'd seen live?

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13 hours ago, Fraildove said:

Where to start... By that time her incredible jump was no longer there, but the softness of her preparation and landings when she did were effortless. She had more turnout than any dancer I’ve seen even now and oh my how she used it. In her adagio her extension was still flawless, with barely any shifting in sher hips or back when doing grand rond de jambe. Her ecarte derrière was could be so far back when she exaggerated, which was rarely, that it was nearly to arabesque without any opening of the hip. In 1st position her feet were beyond 180 degrees and her knees in plié were over her toes. It often left our class shaking our head in disbelief and wondering how we could ever live up to that. From the moment I met her I was struck by her gentleness, a perfect lady she was always. Very feminine and conservative but very wise and opinionated when she needed to be. I was lucky enough to have her as a coach for Aurora and I can recite nearly word for word her insights and corrections. I kept them in a notebook. She was very logical and wanted movement to mean something more than just dancing. Granted this is just how I saw her and interpreted her words and actione. I know of others that might disagree on her personality traits, but I doubt anyone would argue her elegance while demonstrating her class. And a very artistic class she taught!

Thanks, Fraildove. It must have been a wonderful experience.

Since I’m here I’d like to add Anna Pavlova again.

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Thanks atm711 for your firsthand observations. How wonderful to have seen all that – and the Balanchine ballets in such depth.

To Jerome Robbins, Marie-Jeanne, Mary Ellen Moyland, and Tanaquil Le Clercq, I'd add Jilliana and John Kriza.

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24 minutes ago, Quiggin said:

Thanks atm711 for your firsthand observations. How wonderful to have seen all that – and the Balanchine ballets in such depth.

To Jerome Robbins, Marie-Jeanne, Mary Ellen Moyland, and Tanaquil Le Clercq, I'd add Jilliana and John Kriza.

John Kriza goes on my list. I studied with teachers who danced with both ABT & NYCB back in the day. They often spoke of John Kriza's power on stage.  So he and LeClercq are on my list. For recently retired dancers, I always regret that I never saw Carrie Imler live and there is not much video of her.

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19 hours ago, Fraildove said:

Where to start... By that time her incredible jump was no longer there, but the softness of her preparation and landings when she did were effortless. She had more turnout than any dancer I’ve seen even now and oh my how she used it. In her adagio her extension was still flawless, with barely any shifting in sher hips or back when doing grand rond de jambe. Her ecarte derrière was could be so far back when she exaggerated, which was rarely, that it was nearly to arabesque without any opening of the hip. In 1st position her feet were beyond 180 degrees and her knees in plié were over her toes. It often left our class shaking our head in disbelief and wondering how we could ever live up to that. From the moment I met her I was struck by her gentleness, a perfect lady she was always. Very feminine and conservative but very wise and opinionated when she needed to be. I was lucky enough to have her as a coach for Aurora and I can recite nearly word for word her insights and corrections. I kept them in a notebook. She was very logical and wanted movement to mean something more than just dancing. Granted this is just how I saw her and interpreted her words and actione. I know of others that might disagree on her personality traits, but I doubt anyone would argue her elegance while demonstrating her class. And a very artistic class she taught!

Wow, thank you so much for taking the time to write this. This was a pleasure to read!

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I also wish I could have seen many of Mr. B's greats (suzanne, patty, eddie, tanny, allegra, jacque, maria tallchief, etc.) live. Just because from what exists of their dancing it's so sharp and immediate that it's hard to believe they were known as the "company without stars."

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21 hours ago, Fraildove said:

Where to start... By that time her incredible jump was no longer there, but the softness of her preparation and landings when she did were effortless. She had more turnout than any dancer I’ve seen even now and oh my how she used it. In her adagio her extension was still flawless, with barely any shifting in sher hips or back when doing grand rond de jambe. Her ecarte derrière was could be so far back when she exaggerated, which was rarely, that it was nearly to arabesque without any opening of the hip. In 1st position her feet were beyond 180 degrees and her knees in plié were over her toes. It often left our class shaking our head in disbelief and wondering how we could ever live up to that. From the moment I met her I was struck by her gentleness, a perfect lady she was always. Very feminine and conservative but very wise and opinionated when she needed to be. I was lucky enough to have her as a coach for Aurora and I can recite nearly word for word her insights and corrections. I kept them in a notebook. She was very logical and wanted movement to mean something more than just dancing. Granted this is just how I saw her and interpreted her words and actione. I know of others that might disagree on her personality traits, but I doubt anyone would argue her elegance while demonstrating her class. And a very artistic class she taught!

Thank you very much for this account of Sizova in the classroom. 

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23 hours ago, Josette said:

atm711 - Thanks so much for your insightful description of Marie-Jeanne. 

 

Insightful and delightful! Thanks, atm711.

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1 minute ago, kfw said:

Insightful and delightful! Thanks, atm711.

atm711 - I'd love to hear your thoughts on Maria Tallchief!

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On 1/15/2018 at 1:39 AM, Josette said:

Fred Astaire

Oooooo.....that's a good one! I'll second that.

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On 1/14/2018 at 10:39 PM, Josette said:

Fred Astaire

And not Adele?   ;)
It would have been interesting to compare their live Broadway dancing with his later film work.

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3 minutes ago, pherank said:

And not Adele?   ;)
It would have been interesting to compare their live Broadway dancing with his later film work.

Well, that's quite true, pherank, about Adele!  I was watching "I'm Old Fashioned" from You Were Never Lovelier, when I realized Astaire was at the untouchable top of my list of dancers.  I think I would prefer to see him dance solo.   Actually, I would be happy just to have seen him walk across the stage.  

 

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1 minute ago, Josette said:

Well, that's quite true, pherank, about Adele!  I was watching "I'm Old Fashioned" from You Were Never Lovelier, when I realized Astaire was at the untouchable top of my list of dancers.  I think I would prefer to see him dance solo.   Actually, I would be happy just to have seen him walk across the stage.  

 

The funny thing is, Adele was originally considered to be the one with the most raw talent (and Fred seemed to agree with that). But it wasn't until she married and broke up the act that Fred really came into his own. It's unfortunate that there's next to no footage or sound recordings of the Adele and Fred Broadway act.

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I have read that too and I don't take it seriously!  Astaire also would say that Adele was younger than he.  I have no concept of "most raw talent" or what might have been had she not married.   I have also read from his contemporaries that he was a major, esteemed star on his own and not at all secondary when working with Adele in London and New York.  Who can say whether Adele had his musicality or could compose as he did or play the piano as well as he (see "I Don't Dance, Don't Ask Me" from Roberta) or choreograph or had his work ethic?   Keine Ahnung!   All I know is what I see Astaire do.    Love him!

 

 

Edited by Josette

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19 hours ago, Josette said:

atm711 - I'd love to hear your thoughts on Maria Tallchief!

Thanks Josette...if you go to my blog "Ruminations" there is an article on Tallchief.

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18 hours ago, Josette said:

 I have no concept of "most raw talent" or what might have been had she not married.   I have also read from his contemporaries that he was a major, esteemed star on his own and not at all secondary when working with Adele in London and New York.  Who can say whether Adele had his musicality or could compose as he did or play the piano as well as he (see "I Don't Dance, Don't Ask Me" from Roberta) or choreograph or had his work ethic?   Keine Ahnung!   All I know is what I see Astaire do.    Love him!

Josette, Adele Astaire was one of the biggest stage stars of the 20s, at a time when being a star of the theater was of a much higher magnitude than the designation means now, and the central attraction of the brother-and-sister double act, although Fred was indeed singled out for his virtuoso moves even then. So there’s no question of “what might have been” – Adele was. She was also regarded as the greater natural talent, as pherank said.

I love him, too. :)

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12 minutes ago, dirac said:

Josette, Adele Astaire was one of the biggest stage stars of the 20s, at a time when being a star of the theater was of a much higher magnitude than the designation means now, and the central attraction of the brother-and-sister double act, although Fred was indeed singled out for his virtuoso moves even then. So there’s no question of “what might have been” – Adele was. She was also regarded as the greater natural talent, as pherank said.

I love him, too. :)

Thanks, Dirac.  All this is about is my wishing that I had seen Astaire on stage, as various of my relatives and their colleagues did in London and New York, including Adele.   I don't know why I can't have my thoughts based on what I have been told from first-hand spectators in and out of  theatrical business and what I have read, without being chastised! But more power to you!  I will respectfully no longer participate. 

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18 hours ago, pherank said:

 It's unfortunate that there's next to no footage or sound recordings of the Adele and Fred Broadway act.

Actually, there are sound recordings of Fred and Adele singing Gershwin songs from the Broadway shows.  Look for the Astaire CD titled "Puttin' On the Ritz".

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3 hours ago, RUKen said:

Actually, there are sound recordings of Fred and Adele singing Gershwin songs from the Broadway shows.  Look for the Astaire CD titled "Puttin' On the Ritz".

But no dancing.    :-)

Thanks, RUKen. I have a couple of those tracks but didn't know they could be found in one place.

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On 1/15/2018 at 5:35 PM, Quiggin said:

Thanks atm711 for your firsthand observations. How wonderful to have seen all that – and the Balanchine ballets in such depth.

To Jerome Robbins, Marie-Jeanne, Mary Ellen Moyland, and Tanaquil Le Clercq, I'd add Jilliana and John Kriza.

A college roommate of mine studied with Kriza (I think in Indiana) and had many lovely things to say about him as a teacher.

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Nureyev, Nijinsky and Baryshnikov

Yes, I pick ballets based on who is cast as the male leads... although I would have loved to see NYCB’s great ballerinas live too!

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What a neat topic!

For me, personally, it is certain partnerships that I wish I could have seen live... Baryshnikov/Kirkland, Dowell/Sibley, Le Riche/Guillem, Augustyn/Kain, Muntagirov/Klimentova.:wub:

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My wish list is Pavlova, Nijinsky, Leclerq, Sizova,  Soloviev, Kirkland, and Martha Graham.

I was thrilled to see Makarova, Baryshnikov, and Farrell, who remain for me the god and goddesses of dance!  I saw Villella, D'Amboise, McBride and Kent; only Villella was young but the others were still wonderful.  I  saw Plisetskaya dance Dying Swan when she was over 60.  It was memorable.  I would have loved to have seen her in Don Q!  

 

 

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