Jump to content
This Site Uses Cookies. If You Want to Disable Cookies, Please See Your Browser Documentation. ×

Wednesday, January 18


dirac

Recommended Posts

The legacy of artist Sidney Nolan will be celebrated in the U.K. on the occasion of his centenary.

Quote

Before then, a number of his most recognisable images – including that of Ned Kelly – will be on display as part of a major exhibition at Pallant House Gallery, Chichester, which runs from 19 February until 4 June. Transferences: Sidney Nolan in Britain traces the recurrent themes, such as Australian history, literature and mythology, seen throughout his work, as well as exploring his love of music and theatre, as exemplified by the set designs and costumes he created for the Royal Ballet's 1962 production of The Rite of Spring.

 

Link to comment

A preview in brief of Justin Peck's new ballet.

Quote

Set to surging and soulful music by the electronic composer Dan Deacon — you can just imagine the way his four-movement suite about the United States from his album “America” (2012) will come to life through City Ballet’s space-gulping dancers — the work features costumes designed by Humberto Leon.

 

Link to comment

A review of New York City Ballet by Alastair Macaulay in The New York Times.

Quote

The sovereign of this scene is the Siren, the ultimate femme fatale, played on Tuesday by Maria Kowroski, the company’s beloved senior ballerina. It was momentous to see her back onstage after an injury of several months, and (after giving birth in November 2015) dancing on point again for the first time in New York in 19 months. More remarkable was her interpretation. She’s always been physically spectacular — tall and long-limbed even by Balanchine standards — but she had a certain shy warmth. The newly brusque force and cold lewdness she brought on Tuesday was startling and welcome.

 

Link to comment

A review of English National Ballet by Sara Veale for DanceTabs.

Quote

The corps looked a little crowded in the first act, jostling for space amid carts and cottages, but came into their own in the bouncy harvest jig, weaving clean lines as Giselle is crowned ‘Queen of the Vine’. The women return in the second half as Wilis, tantalising in their wispy tulle and imposing in their long lines. Led by the imperious Queen Myrtha (Lauretta Summerscales), they chug, spin and swoop, dutiful foot soldiers in her vengeful crusade against disloyal men. Gliding through the trees, her torso curved and her face shrouded, Summerscales provides one of the production’s most arresting sights. Nothing about her deportment is harsh, yet she’s dominating all the same, diving into arabesques with formidable precision.

 

Link to comment

A review of New York City Ballet's second program by Mary Cargill for danceviewtimes:

 

Spice Girls

 

Quote

The current programming scheme of performing three similar ballets together took a welcome break on Wednesday, as New York City Ballet presented a varied triple bill, proving that variety is really spicy. The all Balanchine program had three varied works: the exhilarating opening, a drama, and a black and white masterpiece.  The newest of these works, "Allegro Brillante", was choreographed in 1956, but there was nothing old-fashioned or fusty about the program or the dancing.

 

 

Link to comment
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...