Jump to content
This Site Uses Cookies. If You Want to Disable Cookies, Please See Your Browser Documentation. ×

ABT 2017 Spring Season at The Met


Recommended Posts

I saw that. I suppose they want to test his recovery before announcing it for the MET. I hope everything goes well so he can be back in his usual roles.

 

I also noticed that all three new Giselles will be performing in Muscat. It's nice that they let them try the role before performing it on the big stage in May.

Link to post

Just saw this too! I'm very pleased that the 3 new Giselle's, Lane (especially), Murphy and Copeland are the only ones performing in Oman. Also, Simkin gets his debut with Lane and Shevchenko gets her first Myrta. And, Hallberg! Who knows, this could be a result of availability, but I'm still impressed that's it's mostly newbees.

Link to post

I'm posting this on the ABT thread assuming that New Yorkers (like me) will read it and, I hope, offer advice. The Pennsylvania Ballet thread doesn't seem to attract much attention.

 

I'd like to go to Philadelphia to see their Corsaire this month. Does anyone know how the rush tickets work? It seems that there are a lot of seats available and it is unlikely to sell out, so the rush seats could be a good deal. Any suggestions?

Link to post
3 minutes ago, Golden Idol said:

I'd like to go to Philadelphia to see their Corsaire this month. Does anyone know how the rush tickets work? It seems that there are a lot of seats available and it is unlikely to sell out, so the rush seats could be a good deal. Any suggestions?

 

Their web site has a page for "rush tickets": http://www.paballet.org/rush-tickets

$10 for students & $15 for others, one hour before

Link to post
19 hours ago, Golden Idol said:

I'm posting this on the ABT thread assuming that New Yorkers (like me) will read it and, I hope, offer advice. The Pennsylvania Ballet thread doesn't seem to attract much attention.

 

I'd like to go to Philadelphia to see their Corsaire this month. Does anyone know how the rush tickets work? It seems that there are a lot of seats available and it is unlikely to sell out, so the rush seats could be a good deal. Any suggestions?

 

Out of curiosity I just looked at regular ticket availability, and I'm surprised at how many orchestra seats there are for most performances. And, the family circle looks to be about 70-80% open every night. Not good. I wonder if ballet-goers (and Philadelphians) are staying home because of what has happened to the company under Corella. Or, is Le Corsaire just not a draw there.

Link to post

Well, yes, ABT Fan, that's my concern. Why should I invest in a ticket in advance if I can simply to go Philadelphia (my Bolt Bus is already booked for 3/19) and an hour beforehand buy a rush ticket. (Sorry, Angel, but economy is important--I buy hardcover books half-price at the Strand, too.)

Link to post

In looking at the ABT spring Met season I see that Kochetkova is only scheduled for 5 performances. She is a good dancer who gets the job done but I can't believe she sells tickets. Personally I found her Swan Lake unexceptional. IMO engaging her is a mistake - those 5 shows could go to home team dancers. Think of what an additional SL or Giselle would mean in the development of any of the dancers at ABT.

Link to post
1 hour ago, vipa said:

In looking at the ABT spring Met season I see that Kochetkova is only scheduled for 5 performances. She is a good dancer who gets the job done but I can't believe she sells tickets. Personally I found her Swan Lake unexceptional. IMO engaging her is a mistake - those 5 shows could go to home team dancers. Think of what an additional SL or Giselle would mean in the development of any of the dancers at ABT.

Vipa, I totally agree. I never buy tickets for any of her performances. And it would be a tribute to the reigning Swan Queen if Veronika could get two performances of SL in a season before it's too late.

Link to post

Release:

 

NEW YORK PREMIERE OF WHIPPED CREAM
BY ALEXEI RATMANSKY TO HIGHLIGHT AMERICAN BALLET THEATRE’S 2017 SPRING SEASON, MAY 15-JULY 8, AT METROPOLITAN OPERA HOUSE

GUEST ARTIST ALESSANDRA FERRI TO DANCE TWO PERFORMANCES AS TATIANA
IN JOHN CRANKO’S
ONEGIN, JUNE 20 AND 22

PRINCIPAL DANCER DIANA VISHNEVA TO GIVE FAREWELL PERFORMANCE JUNE 23

PRINCIPAL DANCER MARCELO GOMES TO CELEBRATE 20TH ANNIVERSARY WITH AMERICAN BALLET THEATRE

BOX OFFICE OPENS MARCH 26 AT 12 NOON

American Ballet Theatre’s 2017 Spring season at the Metropolitan Opera House, May 15-July 8, will feature the New York Premiere of Alexei Ratmansky’s Whipped Cream and the Company Premiere of Ratmansky’s Souvenir d’un lieu cher. Tickets for ABT’s Spring Season at the Metropolitan Opera House go on sale at the box office on Sunday, March 26 at 12 Noon.

Guest Artist Alessandra Ferri will perform the role of Tatiana in Onegin on Tuesday evening, June 20 and Thursday evening, June 22. Principal Dancer Diana Vishneva will give her American Ballet Theatre farewell performance in the same role on Friday evening, June 23 and Principal Dancer Marcelo Gomes will celebrate his 20th Anniversary with the Company as Albrecht in Giselle on Tuesday evening, May 30.

Principal Dancers for the 2017 Metropolitan Opera House season include Stella Abrera, Roberto Bolle, Isabella Boylston, Jeffrey Cirio, Misty Copeland, Herman Cornejo, Marcelo

Gomes, David Hallberg, Maria Kochetkova, Alban Lendorf, Gillian Murphy, Veronika Part, Hee

Seo, Daniil Simkin, Cory Stearns, Diana Vishneva and James Whiteside.

2017 Spring Gala Performance and New York Premiere

American Ballet Theatre’s 2017 Spring Gala on Monday, May 22 at 6:30 P.M. will feature the New York Premiere of Whipped Cream, choreographed by ABT Artist in Residence Alexei Ratmansky, with scenery and costumes by artist Mark Ryden and lighting by Brad Fields. Daniil Simkin, Stella Abrera, David Hallberg and Sarah Lane will perform the leading roles at the New York Premiere. Swarovski is the lead supporter of ABT’s Spring Gala and New York Premiere of Whipped Cream, with sets and costumes enhanced by Swarovski crystals. For more information on ABT’s 2017 Spring Gala, please call the Special Events Office at 212-477-3030, ext. 3310.

Whipped Cream, with a libretto and score by Richard Strauss, is based on the two-act ballet originally created as Schlagobers, which premiered at the Vienna State Opera in 1924. Ratmansky’s production received its World Premiere by ABT on March 15, 2017 at Segerstrom Center for the Arts in Costa Mesa, California. Whipped Cream will be given twelve performances at the Metropolitan Opera House May 22-24 and June 26-July 1.

Company Premiere and Tchaikovsky Spectacular

The Company Premiere of Alexei Ratmansky’s Souvenir d’un lieu cher will be part of a Tchaikovsky Spectacular program beginning Monday evening, July 3. Souvenir d’un lieu cher is set to music of the same name by Peter Ilyitch Tchaikovsky, orchestrated by Alexander Glazunov. Featuring sets and costumes by Keso Dekker with lighting by James F. Ingalls, the ballet for four dancers received its World Premiere by Het National Ballet on February 16, 2012 in Amsterdam. Souvenir d’un lieu cher will be presented on alternating programs with George Balanchine’s Mozartiana and Tchaikovsky Pas de Deux, Marcelo Gomes’ AfterEffect and The Nutcracker pas de deux and Aurora’s Wedding by Ratmansky. Aurora's Wedding, Act III of Ratmansky’s staging of The Sleeping Beauty with choreography by Marius Petipa, will omit the Hop 'o my Thumb and Cinderella dances and add The Porcelain Trio and Three Ivans, divertissements originally choreographed by Bronislava Nijinska. Set to music from The Nutcracker, both divertissements were created for Diaghilev’s Ballets Russes staging of TheSleeping Princess in 1921. Three Ivans was first presented by Ballet Theatre as part of Princess Aurora (a suite of divertissements from The Sleeping Beauty) in 1941. Performances of the Tchaikovsky Spectacular run through July 8.

Full-Length Ballets

American Ballet Theatre’s 2017 Spring season will include an additional six full-length ballets beginning with Don Quixote which opens the Met season on Monday evening, May 15 with Gillian Murphy as Kitri, Cory Stearns as Basilio, Hee Seo as Mercedes and James Whiteside as Espada. Staged by Kevin McKenzie and Susan Jones, with choreography after Marius Petipa and Alexander Gorsky, Don Quixote is set to music by Ludwig Minkus and features scenery and costumes by Santo Loquasto and lighting by Natasha Katz. The McKenzie/Jones staging of the current production was first performed by ABT on June 12, 1995. Don Quixote will be given eight performances through Saturday evening, May 20.

The season’s performances of Giselle begins Thursday evening, May 25 led by Hee Seo in the title role, opposite Cory Stearns as Albrecht and Veronika Part as Myrta. Set to music by Adolphe Adam, with scenery by Gianni Quaranta, costumes by Anna Anni and lighting by Jennifer Tipton, Giselle features choreography after Jean Coralli, Jules Perrot and Marius Petipa and has been staged for ABT by Artistic Director Kevin McKenzie. The world premiere of Giselle, one of the oldest continually-performed ballets, occurred at the Theatre de l’Academie Royale de Musique in Paris on June 28, 1841. The ballet was first presented by ABT (then Ballet Theatre) at the Center Theatre in New York City on January 12, 1940 with choreography by Anton Dolin and scenery and costumes by Lucinda Ballard. The leading roles were danced by Annabelle Lyon and Anton Dolin. American Ballet Theatre’s sixth production, featuring scenery by Gianni Quaranta and costumes by Anna Anni, was created for the film Dancers, produced in 1987 by Cannon Films. This production’s first public performance was given on March 20, 1987 at the Shrine Auditorium in Los Angeles, California, with Marianna Tcherkassky as Giselle and Kevin McKenzie as Albrecht. The current staging is by McKenzie, using the Quaranta and Anni designs. Giselle will receive eight performances through May 31.

Alexei Ratmansky’s The Golden Cockerel will be given four performances beginning Thursday evening, June 1 with Stella Abrera (Queen of Shemakhan), Cassandra Trenary (the Golden Cockerel), Alexei Agoudine (Tsar Dodon) and James Whiteside (Astrologer) leading the first cast. Set to music by Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov with sets and costumes by Richard Hudson, Ratmansky’s The Golden Cockerel is inspired by Michel Fokine’s original production. Anne Holm-Jensen Peyk has staged the ballet for ABT. The Golden Cockerel received its Company Premiere at the Metropolitan Opera House on June 6, 2016 led by Veronika Part, Skylar Brandt, Gary Chryst and Cory Stearns.

The season’s first performance of Le Corsaire on Monday, June 5 features Maria Kochetkova, Herman Cornejo, Sarah Lane, Daniil Simkin and Jeffrey Cirio in the leading roles. Based on the Lord Byron poem “The Corsair” (1814), the ballet features choreography by Konstantin Sergeyev after Marius Petipa, and staging by Anna-Marie Holmes after Petipa and Sergeyev, with music by Adolphe Adam, Cesare Pugni, Léo Delibes, Riccardo Drigo and Prince Oldenbourg. SceneryandcostumesarebyIrinaTibilova,withadditionalcostumedesignsby Robert Perdziola and lighting by Mary Jo Dondlinger. Le Corsaire received its Company Premiere by American Ballet Theatre on June 19, 1998 with Nina Ananiashvili (Medora), Ashley Tuttle (Gulnare), Giuseppe Picone (Conrad), Angel Corella (Birbanto), Jose Manuel Carreño (Ali, the slave) and Vladimir Malakhov (Lankendem). Le Corsaire will be given eight performances through June 10.

Eight performances of Swan Lake, choreographed by Kevin McKenzie after Marius Petipa, will be given beginning Monday, June 12 with Isabella Boylston and Alban Lendorf leading the opening night cast. Swan Lake is set to the score by Peter Ilyitch Tchaikovsky and features scenery and costumes by Zack Brown and lighting by Duane Schuler. This production of Swan Lake premiered on March 24, 2000 at the Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts in Washington, D.C. with Julie Kent (Odette-Odile), Angel Corella (Prince Siegfried) and Marcelo Gomes (von Rothbart).

John Cranko’s Onegin will be given eight performances during the Company’s Spring season beginning on Monday, June 19 with Diana Vishneva as Tatiana and Marcelo Gomes as Eugene Onegin. Set to music by Peter Ilyitch Tchaikovsky, arranged and orchestrated by Kurt- Heinz Stolze, Onegin is based on the verse-novel Eugene Onegin by Alexander Pushkin. Onegin received its World Premiere on April 13, 1965 by the Stuttgart Ballet in Stuttgart, Germany. The ballet received its Company Premiere by American Ballet Theatre on June 1, 2001 at the Metropolitan Opera House in New York with Julie Kent (Tatiana), Robert Hill (Onegin), Vladimir Malakhov (Lensky) and Maria Riccetto (Olga). This new production, with sets and costumes by Santo Loquasto and lighting by James F. Ingalls, was premiered by the National Ballet of Canada on June 19, 2010 at the Four Seasons Centre for the Performing Arts, Toronto, Canada and was first performed by ABT on June 4, 2012 at the Metropolitan Opera House. Onegin is staged for ABT by Reid Anderson and Jane Bourne.

ABTKids

ABTKids, American Ballet Theatre’s annual one-hour introduction to ballet, is scheduled for Saturday morning, May 20 at 11:30 A.M. All tickets for ABTKids are $25.

Individual tickets for American Ballet Theatre’s 2017 Spring Season at the Metropolitan Opera House, on sale beginning Sunday, March 26 at 12:00 Noon, are available at the Met box office, by phone at 212-362-6000, or online at ABT’s website www.abt.org. Tickets start at $22. The Metropolitan Opera House is located on Broadway between 64th and 65th streets in New York City.

Rush Tickets:
American Ballet Theatre offers a limited number of $30 Rush tickets for every

performance of the Met Season, to be purchased online on a first come, first served basis. Ticket buyers may purchase up to one pair of tickets for one performance, every 7 days. Rush tickets go on-sale at Noon for Monday through Friday performances, at 2pm for Saturday evening performances, and four hours prior to curtain for matinees. Rush ticket purchases require advance registration on the Met website. For more information, please visit: www.metopera.org

Student Ticket Policy:
American Ballet Theatre offers $11-$30 advance tickets for any full-time student with a

valid student ID to an undergraduate or graduate program. Tickets are subject to availability and require advance registration on the Met website. Limit four tickets per person, per performance. For more information, please visit: www.metopera.org.

Complete casting follows.

 

American Airlines is the Official Airline of American Ballet Theatre. Northern Trust is the Leading Corporate Sponsor of the American Ballet Theatre Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis School. ABT is supported, in part, with public funds from the National Endowment for the Arts; the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature; and the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs, in partnership with the City Council.

Swarovski is the Lead Supporter of ABT’s Spring Gala and New York Premiere of Whipped Cream.

Leadership support for Whipped Cream and The Golden Cockerel has been provided by the Blavatnik Family Foundation and the Lloyd E. Rigler – Lawrence E. Deutsch Foundation. Additional support has been provided by Linda Allard, Avery and Andrew F. Barth, The Susan and Leonard Feinstein Foundation, Brian J. Heidtke, the Segerstrom Center for the Arts, the Ted and Mary Jo Shen Charitable Gift Fund, The H. Russell Smith Foundation, and Stewart R. Smith and Robin A. Ferracone. Whipped Cream and The Golden Cockerel are generously supported through an endowed gift from The Toni and Martin Sosnoff New Works Fund.

AfterEffect has been generously supported through an endowed gift from The Toni and Martin Sosnoff New Works Fund.

American Ballet Theatre's performances of Le Corsaire are generously underwritten through an endowed gift from Irene and Fred Shen.

Don Quixote is generously supported through an endowed gift from Anka K. Palitz, in memory of Clarence Y. Palitz, Jr.

American Ballet Theatre’s performances of Giselle are generously supported through an endowed gift from Sharon Patrick.

David H. Koch is the Lead Underwriter of American Ballet Theatre’s The Nutcracker.
American Ballet Theatre’s performances of Onegin are generously supported through an endowed

gift from Ruth and Harold Newman.

ABT gratefully acknowledges Lead Sponsor of The Sleeping Beauty, David H. Koch. Additional leadership support is generously provided by the Lloyd E. Rigler – Lawrence E. Deutsch Foundation.

Swan Lake has been generously underwritten by R. Chemers Neustein. Costumes for Swan Lake are generously sponsored by the Ellen Everett Kimiatek Costume Preservation Trust.

Deutsche Bank is the Lead Sponsor of ABTKids.
Bloomberg Philanthropies is the Supporting Sponsor of ABTKids.

Link to post

I just finished buying tickets on-line for the Met season. Whew! The site has been so sluggish that it took me over an hour to buy roughly two weeks worth of tickets, given the time-out feature. The site is also very user unfriendly. After you pick a seat and add it to your cart, it's ridiculously complicated getting back to shopping to pick another. My sense is that a lot more tickets have sold and many fewer good seats were available, compared to other years, although I haven't attempted anything like a serious count of availability.

Link to post

I suspect that today the site was sluggish because this was the first day that single tickets were made available to the general public, so that traffic to the site was especially heavy. It's good that you did it today, especially if seats are going quickly.

Link to post

This is the first year in which dynamic pricing went into effect on the day public sales started.  Previously, the dynamic pricing went into effect a week after the box office opened for sale.  Doing a completely unscientific perusal of the site, it seems like they have jacked up the prices regardless of how the tickets are selling. For example, the Boylston and Hee Seo Giselles are selling poorly at the balcony level, but they still raised the price to $50 (on subscription those same balcony tickets were $45).  So is this just a uniform price increase?  It doesn't seem to be based on the briskness of  ticket sales.

Link to post

I agree with California. That site is awful, not user friendly. They should make it easier to buy more than one ticket at a time. Just got my Lane/Simkin and Abrera/Gomes Giselle tickets. Hooray! Now to decide on which Whipped Cream cast (I wish Hallberg was in another performance other than the gala).

Link to post
5 hours ago, ABT Fan said:

Now to decide on which Whipped Cream cast (I wish Hallberg was in another performance other than the gala).

 

You can now buy "performance only" tickets to the Gala performance of Whipped Cream on the regular ABT web site. Just as an example, there are Row A Dress Circle tickets available (admittedly not center, but not terrible) for $100.

 

I'm going to the Gala performance, but If I were free for the Tuesday Cornejo Whipped Cream, I would also go to that. 

Link to post

I seek your advice. As part of my membership in ABT I signed up for the dress rehearsal for Giselle. I've never been to a dress rehearsal before. What is it like? How does it work? Do you see multiple casts? Does the director frequently stop the flow? Would I get enough of the performance so that I don't need to buy a ticket for another performance of Giselle? I have seen ABT's Giselle many, many times over the years and love it. Thank you for your input.

Link to post
5 minutes ago, CTballetfan said:

I seek your advice. As part of my membership in ABT I signed up for the dress rehearsal for Giselle. I've never been to a dress rehearsal before. What is it like? How does it work? Do you see multiple casts? Does the director frequently stop the flow? Would I get enough of the performance so that I don't need to buy a ticket for another performance of Giselle? I have seen ABT's Giselle many, many times over the years and love it. Thank you for your input.

In my limited experience, the flow is interrupted and you may or may not see different casts. But one thing is for certain: you won't see the cast performing that evening (if there is a Giselle that night).

Link to post
7 minutes ago, CTballetfan said:

I seek your advice. As part of my membership in ABT I signed up for the dress rehearsal for Giselle. I've never been to a dress rehearsal before. What is it like? How does it work? Do you see multiple casts? Does the director frequently stop the flow? Would I get enough of the performance so that I don't need to buy a ticket for another performance of Giselle? I have seen ABT's Giselle many, many times over the years and love it. Thank you for your input.

 

I've been to quite a few and always enjoy them. Although you won't see that night's cast (as Olga notes), you might see several from later in the week. It's very unpredictable. At last year's Romeo & Juliet rehearsal, we got four casts, although most only did one act or part of an act. Some are in costume, some not. One scary moment last year was seeing Ferri fall when she ran back up the stairs at the end of the balcony scene, and I found myself watching that carefully in performances later in the week.

Link to post
2 hours ago, CTballetfan said:

I seek your advice. As part of my membership in ABT I signed up for the dress rehearsal for Giselle. I've never been to a dress rehearsal before. What is it like? How does it work? Do you see multiple casts? Does the director frequently stop the flow? Would I get enough of the performance so that I don't need to buy a ticket for another performance of Giselle? I have seen ABT's Giselle many, many times over the years and love it. Thank you for your input.

There are a lot of variables.  Sometimes all of the lead dancers will rehearse as if performing, and sometimes one or more will just mark their dances (especially if coming back from an injury or if they are in the performance that night).  Sometimes there are people on stage in warmup clothing instead of costumes (presumably because their costumes are being repaired or altered).  Sometimes a stagehand will wander onto the stage to move a prop.  Sometimes (actually, often) you will hear instructions from a rehearsal director being given to the performers onstage, while they continue to perform (and you may see a brief acknowledgement of the correction from the dancers).  Usually (as stated above), the different acts are performed by different casts, and sometimes after an act has been completed a pas de deux will be danced by a pair who are not otherwise in the rehearsal. 

 

If you are not too picky about seat selection, your best option may be to watch the rehearsal and then decide if you want to see more of one of the casts that has just rehearsed or if you'd rather see the whole thing performed by a different cast.  You can go right to the box office after the rehearsal has ended.

Link to post

The TBA on Gillian's debut as Giselle has not been filled in yet, but this looks promising....  Oh I hope this is what will happen.  What a day of Giselle's the 27th of May will be!

 

 

Link to post
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...