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This aspect of the Brexit enterprise hasn't gotten much attention. Here are some articles. I'd be interested to hear from Ballet Alerters on the other side of the water (and others, of course). Also to thank them for making our own election season seem slightly less insane.

The ability for the UK to access the €1.3 billion Creative Europe programme could now be in jeopardy, while arts figures have warned of the effects Brexit will have on access to and movement of talent.

Related.

British arts organizations received grants totaling £40 million ($54.7 million) from the EU’s Creative Europe funding program in 2014 and 2015, according to Arts Council England. Additional support comes from other EU funding programs not specifically related to the arts, including the European Regional Development Fund. Oscar-winning films made in the U.K., including “The King’s Speech” and “The Iron Lady,” and key cultural institutions, such as Tate Liverpool, all received funds from the EU.

Related.

John Summers, chief executive of the Halle Orchestra in Manchester, which employs players from 14 countries and many visiting artists and conductors, said: “Leaving would be disastrous. The biggest thing that has changed in UK orchestras over the past 10 to 20 years is the quality of players coming for audition from outside the UK – it has been hugely positive.”
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We await further developments to determine what the effects of the referendum will be on the arts and everything else. You need to understand that the referendum is not binding it is only advisory so in theory the Government could just choose to ignore it At the moment Mrs May is saying "Brexit means Brexit". However that could change if things go horribly wrong before the Government has prepared its negotiation strategy. If it were to become clear that the the economy is being as badly affected as the Remain campaigners warned it would be or the Brexiteers who have been given the job of preparing for the leave negotiations make a complete hash of it then Mrs May might decide that Parliament must act to counter the adverse effects of the referendum decision. I don't think that she would go for another referendum as you can't rely on people making rational decisions, but you never know. Meanwhile we all have to live our lives;people will decide what's best for them and funding for all sorts of things will dry up.

Notice has to be given under Article 50 of the Lisbon Treaty to trigger the process of leaving the EU. It is thought that is unlikely to happen before 2017.Negotiations begin at that point and the UK remains a member of the EU for a further two years after notice is given. It is unlikely that everything will be unravelled and sorted within that period.Of course the world will not stand still during this time and it would seem that the scientific community is already having problems as a result of the referendum result. Sources of funding are drying up and scientists are having second thoughts about coming to the UK to work. There is no reason to believe that the that referendum result won't have a similar effect on the arts. It's not simply funding that has been hit opportunities to work in the EU are likely to reduce before the two years have expired. While the situation for EU citizens currently working here as dancers and of UK citizens working as dancers in Europe is unlikely to be affected the prospects for student dancers don't look quite so bright,They will just have to wait and see.Somehow I don't think that anyone involved in the process is going to be too concerned about the "elitist" arts.

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Thank you for posting, AshtonFan. Yes, I have read that the referendum is non-binding, and constitutionally speaking there is an argument that Parliament could override it if it chose. As a practical political matter, however, there would seem to be a good deal of risk in ignoring the voters’ voice, especially as the vote was not really that close (another reason not to call another referendum, at least not for awhile; at present, there’s no reason to be sure that the result would be different). As you say, the strategy seems to be to hold off pulling the trigger as long as possible. But even if nothing happens for several years, as seems likely, arts organizations, like businesses, have to plan ahead. To say nothing of foreign-born individual artists......

A few pluses for visitors this season:

Lucie Pohl, who is bringing her show Apohlcalypse Now! to Edinburgh, says she’ll save about $2,000 against her previous Edinburgh visit, which would allow her to hire people to hand out flyers for her show. She thinks she’ll ultimately save about $3,000 in total and, echoing Moretti’s gustatory interest, says it would be cheaper for her to eat while in Edinburgh and that some of the savings might go toward more Nutella crepes. But she notes that since box office revenue will be in pounds sterling, her revenue, when converted back to dollars, will be less overall.
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I don't know whether your news media have picked up on this but it seems that some people are regretting voting "Out". Now I know that you can't be absolutely certain about what will happen in circumstances that no country has experienced and neither campaign covered itself in glory as far as informing the voters about the likely consequences of leaving might be. As you might imagine the Out campaign was fueled by a great deal of emotion and very few facts. The Out campaigners appear to have done no serious thinking about what the economic consequences of leaving were likely to be.They presented the electorate with a number of models for our new relationship with the EU none of which had been really thought through ;all of which crumbled on close scrutiny;now we will have "our own model" and everything will be sweetness and light. Many of the disadvantages of leaving that were dismissed as "Project Fear" seem to be turning out to be "Project Reality"..

Now while you can't ignore what the people have said in a referendum I am not convinced that the electorate will be overjoyed by a Prime Minister who by following their "expressed will" does the political equivalent of driving the family car into a brick wall.. That's why I would not be surprised if the new Prime Minister manages to find a way out of following the advice that the people have given her. She has secured the services of two of the most well known of the Leave campaigners to get to grips with the problem that they have created. This means that they will either be revealed to be incompetents if they get the preparation for the negotiations wrong or they will carry the can if the whole process produces a result that appears to be far worse than the country's current position.

Meanwhile ordinary people, students, dancers and musicians will do their best to get by and cope with the consequences of this decision. A significant number are rediscovering their Irish grandparents.Now while it is true that a lot of people who voted "Leave" are deeply attached to traditional values and the old way of doing things not everyone who voted "Leave" is so attached to the past. I wonder what their response will be if the economic consequences of voting "Out" really begin to hit in the six months that the preparation for the negotiations is supposed to be going to take.If the pound really goes down the tubes and things that people want to buy from abroad go up significantly and employers find that they are short of essential staff. The UK imports a lot of food from Europe and a lot of people from Europe are employed in the Health Service and as seasonal farm workers.

I expect that companies like the RB will continue to recruit the dancers that they want regardless of their country of origin but what will happen to the young British dancers who currently work abroad is far from clear.

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I don't know whether your news media have picked up on this but it seems that some people are regretting voting "Out". Now I know that you can't be absolutely certain about what will happen in circumstances that no country has experienced and neither campaign covered itself in glory as far as informing the voters about the likely consequences of leaving might be. As you might imagine the Out campaign was fueled by a great deal of emotion and very few facts. The Out campaigners appear to have done no serious thinking about what the economic consequences of leaving were likely to be.They presented the electorate with a number of models for our new relationship with the EU none of which had been really thought through ;all of which crumbled on close scrutiny;now we will have "our own model" and everything will be sweetness and light. Many of the disadvantages of leaving that were dismissed as "Project Fear" seem to be turning out to be "Project Reality"..

Now while you can't ignore what the people have said in a referendum I am not convinced that the electorate will be overjoyed by a Prime Minister who by following their "expressed will" does the political equivalent of driving the family car into a brick wall.. That's why I would not be surprised if the new Prime Minister manages to find a way out of following the advice that the people have given her. She has secured the services of two of the most well known of the Leave campaigners to get to grips with the problem that they have created. This means that they will either be revealed to be incompetents if they get the preparation for the negotiations wrong or they will carry the can if the whole process produces a result that appears to be far worse than the country's current position.

Meanwhile ordinary people, students, dancers and musicians will do their best to get by and cope with the consequences of this decision. A significant number are rediscovering their Irish grandparents.Now while it is true that a lot of people who voted "Leave" are deeply attached to traditional values and the old way of doing things not everyone who voted "Leave" is so attached to the past. I wonder what their response will be if the economic consequences of voting "Out" really begin to hit in the six months that the preparation for the negotiations is supposed to be going to take.If the pound really goes down the tubes and things that people want to buy from abroad go up significantly and employers find that they are short of essential staff. The UK imports a lot of food from Europe and a lot of people from Europe are employed in the Health Service and as seasonal farm workers.

I expect that companies like the RB will continue to recruit the dancers that they want regardless of their country of origin but what will happen to the young British dancers who currently work abroad is far from clear.

Thanks, "Ashton Fan" for your clear evaluations of the "Brexit" issue. I too wonder about "buyers' remorse" in Britain, and of course here in the States, as we face many of the same issues with distorted "truths" coming to us. My hope is that the arts in the UK will come through all right with little fuss, but not holding my breath.

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I certainly do get that, AshtonFan. I had read that “Bregret” was not widespread enough to actually risk putting the issue to the voters again any time soon. I like your metaphor of the family car.

This means that they will either be revealed to be incompetents

Not much of a revelation at this point. :)

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Agree about the sense of "buyers' remorse" and concerns about the possibilities for young artists to work internationally. As I understand it, educational institutions in general have developed strong ties across borders in the EU -- this is just one of a plethora of areas that will be disrupted by severing ties.

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As a Brit who lived in the US for 17.5 years (I legally renounced the American nationality I had once worked so hard to achieve - and paid $2,350 for the privilege to exercise that 'inalienable right' early in December of last year in Slovakia simply because the better side of my own personal compromise was telling me - nay demanding - that I should - there was too much in the American political kitchen that I no longer understood let alone supported) I do - although I voted remain in the British referendum - genuinely believe that the Brexit IN THE LONG RUN MAY have many positive impacts on the Arts. (Perhaps I'm a total simpleton.) I, myself, was fortunate - prior to the final establishment of what was the EEC - to practically gain from the reciprocal rights in the arts that used to be common practice between members of Commonwealth nations. While such rights were entirely expunged by the time of the practical creation of what we call the EU I pray that - with time - some of the joy of those much valued interchanges and supporting cultural factors might be restored.

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You may think that their incompetence is self evident but Boris Johnson has led a charmed life. He has got into all sorts of scrapes and his time as Mayor of London was far from being an unalloyed success but he has managed to escape the consequences, The public at large believe that he was a great success. The reason for this is that he is rarely subject to criticism by the media.. The explanation of his charmed life is as follows:-1) He is a journalist and writes for publications whose owners share his politics.2) Journalist dog does not bite journalist dog.3) He is one of the few Conservative politicians who has a high profile and is popular with the public at large and so he is too important to the party to be tackled over his failures and incompetence.

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Cameron seems to be taking the heat for the vote, even though he was in the Remain camp.

He agreed to call the referendum as part of a deal with the anti-EU wing of the party, essentially gambling the nation's future to resolve a persistent intra-party factional dispute, because he thought he would win - understandably to a point, because he usually does. To quote Gore Vidal, it looks like Hugh Bris was back in town.

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You may think that their incompetence is self evident but Boris Johnson has led a charmed life. He has got into all sorts of scrapes and his time as Mayor of London was far from being an unalloyed success but he has managed to escape the consequences, The public at large believe that he was a great success. The reason for this is that he is rarely subject to criticism by the media.. The explanation of his charmed life is as follows:-1) He is a journalist and writes for publications whose owners share his politics.2) Journalist dog does not bite journalist dog.3) He is one of the few Conservative politicians who has a high profile and is popular with the public at large and so he is too important to the party to be tackled over his failures and incompetence.

Thank you for the explanation, AshtonFan.

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Four years or so later, and the deed is done. It will be interesting to see what happens in the performing arts, as if they didn't have enough to cope with right now.

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However in the government’s Brexit deal, which MPs voted in favour of yesterday and comes into force from tomorrow (January 1), there is nothing in place to secure free longterm working travel for artists and crew without potentially prohibitive costs.

Related.

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“Some of the institutions told me they haven’t made plans with European artists because they cannot afford to plan something and then to have to change it according to whatever legislation might come in December or January,” she said. “There’s too much uncertainty.”

Related.

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James Reed, the chairman of leading recruitment firm REED, said that with vaccines and the lifting of lockdowns, 'the lights will go back on in London and our other cities'. 

'This will release creative energy. New artists will emerge and there will be a golden age of theatre and music,' he added. 'And all the brilliant ideas germinated in lockdown can be brought to fruition.' 

 

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“Some of the institutions told me they haven’t made plans with European artists because they cannot afford to plan something and then to have to change it according to whatever legislation might come in December or January,” she said. “There’s too much uncertainty.”

It will be interesting to see if this redirects many European artists to look for work in North and South America, and Asian-Pacific countries rather than the UK.

Edited by pherank
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Somehow I doubt it. Big names were already touring the United States and Japan. For everyone else the travel costs are prohibitive. And employment with most arts organizations in North America or Japan comes with few, if any, benefits.

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An update, concentrating on the ongoing front burner issue of touring:

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For bands, singers, orchestras, opera stars, their crews and technicians – and frankly anyone who heavily relies on touring as part of their work, from theatres to ballet companies – freedom of movement and the transporting of goods are vital. Prior to Brexit, performing in a different European city every day, and transporting a whole load of kit to boot, was a straightforward, regular part of life.  

 

 

 

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8 hours ago, volcanohunter said:

Somehow I doubt it. Big names were already touring the United States and Japan. For everyone else the travel costs are prohibitive. And employment with most arts organizations in North America or Japan comes with few, if any, benefits.

The 'benefits' are specific to the location, company and artist's contract. Right now of course, there's a lot of quarantine happening on the various continents to interfere with business as usual. With so many travel restrictions hampering movement, and cities in lockdown, it doesn't seem to be a good time for most people to make a change of residence, in any case.

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Thank you for the link, Lynette H. Here's an interesting quote:

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 International revenue accounts for 72% of AKC income over the last 20 years, and “the most lucrative market – where we have quick access and can make a good buck – is Europe.” Despite hubs like Leicester and Manchester, the British audience for contemporary dance is limited, he argues. “In 2006, we figured out that it was costing us £17,000 a week to tour to a UK venue. I don’t know what the cost is now. It’s not a viable model. We couldn’t survive.”

 

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