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ABT 2016 Spring Gala/ Ratmansky Triple Bills


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The big news at the gala last night was the premiere of the Ratmansky Serenade After Plato's Symposium. My initial reaction was overall a negative one. Not all music is suitable to choreography, and I think that is one of the main problems with this ballet. Ratmansky seems to enjoy taking obscure pieces of music and superimposing choreography on to the music, irrespective of whether the music is really a suitable vehicle for dance. This was also one of the downfalls of his Tempest a few years ago, in my opinion.

Apart from the music, the other substantial problem was that it was presented at the Met. On that huge stage, this chamber ballet simply is swallowed up. There is no scenery, and most of the ballet consists of solos. The Met is not a great venue for that kind of work. On the positive side, some of the choreography was exciting. Each and every cast member did an excellent job. Simkin stole the show with the flashiest choreography. Herman Cornejo was also given a bravura solo. Other memorable moments were solos performed by Calvin Royal and Gabe Shayer. I didn't like the men's costumes because the baggy legs of the pants obscured the leg lines of the dancers. Devon Teucher, however, looked and danced like a goddess in a brief pdd with Gomes. Her costume was a Grecian style dress. This is not one of Ratmansky's great works. There were some excellent moments, but overall the ballet had too many sections that were not interesting. (If you want to see a great Ratmansky work this week, cross the plaza and see DSCH at NYCB.)

I was not a fan of this Firebird when it debuted a few years ago. I didn't like Firebird any better during this revival. It was tedious. Especially awful, in my opinion, is the choreography for the maidens. Poor Stella was a principal stuck in a soloist role.

Kochetkova was marvelous in the Act I excerpt from Sylvia. Hee Seo was lyrical and beautiful in the Vision scene from Beauty. This is the type of role where she excels. Part was Lilac, but this scene basically has no dancing for Lilac. Stearns was a terrific and ardent Desire.

The ribbon dance from Fille was well performed by Boylston and Cirio. Boylston may be a bit too tall for Ciriio.

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Monday night's ABT gala started with the uplifting sight of an elegant audience, with the gentlemen in sharp tuxedos and the ladies in glittering evening gowns - I did not know that American's have such an interesting tradition of celebrating Monday evenings by going to a theater in style, but think it is a great one.

The opening featuring a scene from Sylvia disappointed once again, the ladies in the corps looked slack, out of rhythm and tentative - it felt like dancing this piece was an arduous and unpleasant task for them. And Kochetkova's presence did not lift things up. The scene from Sleeping Beauty was puzzling - perhaps one needs to see the full length ballet to understand why Aurora looked so solemn and forlorn, as if channeling her inner Odette. I guess there she is but an apparition shown to the prince by the Lilac Fairy, and she longs for her prince in her slumber, but I thought a more joyful subdued anticipation of a young girl dreaming of love would have been more logical here. Cory Stearns with his dreamy good looks would have been the quintessential prince Charming had it not been for the drab redcoat uniform in which he was dressed up.

La Fille Mal Guardee was light and enjoyable, whatever Boylston may have lacked in gracefulness, she more than made up for it with cheer and charm, Cirio was a diligent supporting character to his partner.

Apart from the beautiful Faure music and pleasant aesthetic, Requiem did not leave a lasting impression. I understand that Ferri is somewhat of a legendary figure here, and she has beautiful feet, but I did not fall under a spell from her artistry.

This was followed by bows by all artists that appeared so far, an obvious misfire by the gala's director, as it was both unexpected and illogical, at first it looked that Masha was inadvertently wandering onstage as the curtains were going up and surprised at being presented a bouquet of flowers. Having the artists bow and receive their flowers after each of their respective performance would have been a better decision.

For me, Symposium was nothing short of a revelation, so seamless, organic and exciting was its fusion of the music, the costumes and the outstanding bodily expressiveness of the dancers. It had incredible speed, exhilarating leaps and turns, intricate combinations, and above all, a pervading beauty throughout, the same pure all-conquering beauty that was so glorified and worshiped by Socrates and his followers. This was one of the most incredible displays of male dancing that I remember seeing, and it will never look the same to me again. it is a real pity that I will not have a chance to see it several times again, to more consciously grasp the numerous messages and meanings pervading this work and to relate it to Plato's treatise.

Overall, I came to the performance yesterday thinking that Ratmansky was talented, but overhyped, his choreography often not showing enough creativity and imagination, and his scene settings and dramatic development sometimes too straightforward and sagging, rescued only by his knack for slapstick. Yesterday, I realized how completely wrong I had been, and what a visionary he truly is when afforded the proper time and the proper artistic talent to create his works.

I also liked his Firebird, its somewhat unusual psycho-industrial aesthetic surprisingly fitting the story. And his style fits ABT's talents like a glove - here the female corps were comfortable, convincing and fully in their element in the grotesque comical acting and dancing style of the green maidens. Copeland demonstrated a very compelling well-prepared part of the Firebird, with crisp dashes and a fiery quiver that did full justice to this part's name. I was infatuated by Abrera, her crystalline slender physique and a fragile graciousness. How come such a marvel has inhabited the company unseen for so long? Yesterday's was an ungrateful role for a ballerina of her composition, but I would think she must be an incredible Giselle or Odette, am I guessing right? Gomes was a hilarious Ivan the Fool, and Stearns once again made my breath stop with only his ominous, yet seductive stare.

Overall, whatever disappointments I had after last week's Sylvia, they were more than fully redeemed by the Monday gala. And thus concludes this little bit on ABT by an untainted eye that has not seen much of it.

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Both your commentaries elevated my excitement and curiosity to see Serenade After Plato's Symposium in LA in July. I don't know if it does follow Plato's Symposium at all, but there are a lot of romantic/platonic dynamics (primarily male/homosexual) in Symposium that's different from the typical love stories in classical ballet, so I'm hoping for a very original and fresh performance/choreography.

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(If you want to see a great Ratmansky work this week, cross the plaza and see DSCH at NYCB.)

...but if you want to see two great Ratmansky works, stick on this side of the plaza for the Shostakovich Trilogy program! :wink:

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For me, the new Ratmansky work never looked like a ballet because it lacked structure. It looked like a series of solos strung together, with no apparent connection to one another. I never felt there was a unity of purpose or meaning running throughout the work. Nor did I think that the solos conveyed any particular meaning. Nice to see Simkin do his circus tricks and show off his talents, but what was the underlying meaning or purpose of it. Seeing it again tonight. Perhaps new layers will be revealed.

As a point of comparison, I'm going to compare the Ratmanksy ballet to Robbins' Dances at a Gathering, which also has a string of solos, pdd's and trios. The big difference is that Robbins weaves into the choreography scenes which convey an underlying meaning that unites all the disparate sections of the ballet, so that the ballet looks like a unified work. It's a masterpiece. In contrast, the individual solos of the Ratmansky work never gel together as a unified whole, or convey any particular purpose or meaning through the choreography.

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As usual, the list of ABT sidelined principals is growing. Herman Cornejo suffered an injury sometime yesterday afternoon and was unable to perform in last night's "Symphony #9." (An enormous groan rose from the audience at this announcement.) Joseph Gorak appeared in his place, however, and gave a splendid performance. No word yet on how long Cornejo will be out (leave it to ABT to keep it a secret as long as possible), but he is scheduled to dance both this afternoon and this evening, so we'll see.

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Would anyone be able to provide a brief description of the dance configurations (e.g. which principals/soloists, presence or absence of corps) for the various movements of Ratmansky's "Symphony #9"? I only saw the piece once before and only have fuzzy recollections of it. I'm only getting to see it once more this year, but I really like when I can go in with a sense of the overall architecture of the work.

The musical movements are as follows:

1. Allegro

2. Moderato

3. Presto

4. Largo

5. Allegretto

Thanks much!

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Cornejo danced this afternoon in Seven Sonatas. As an aside, I liked Symposium a little better the second time around. I saw it at the gala and felt the same way as you, abatt. I hope they give Cornejo a rest so he can perform Colas with Misty next week.

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Cornejo danced last night, too.

By the way, Simkin and Aaron Scott are alternating in the same part in the new Ratmanksy ballet. Based on what I saw last night, the solo variation that Aaron Scott is performing is not the same as the one Simkin performed. Scott's is easier and requires less virtuosity. I guess this is due, in part, to the fact that Scott also has a difficult lead role in Seven Sonatas on the same program.

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Cornejo danced last night, too.

By the way, Simkin and Aaron Scott are alternating in the same part in the new Ratmanksy ballet. Based on what I saw last night, the solo variation that Aaron Scott is performing is not the same as the one Simkin performed. Scott's is easier and requires less virtuosity. I guess this is due, in part, to the fact that Scott also has a difficult lead role in Seven Sonatas on the same program.

It was interesting to watch the full first cast yesterday afternoon (Cirio replacing Cornejo). I felt there was more of a "conversation" going on rather than just one dancer performing after another. I would like to have seen Cornejo with his actual cast to see if the feeling was different, but I could not stay last night and I don't think I will get back for it. One of the problems with choreographing these new rep pieces is usually the second cast does not get as much rehearsal as the first cast. So, that could be the difference for Simkin/Scott. Maybe he just did not have time to come up to speed. Scott is a talented dancer, but I also know he has a lot on his plate, too. Without the addition of guest dancers, the company dancers will have to take on more roles. This is a good thing, in my opinion. I liked this quote from Macaulay's review,

"Though “Sylvia,” “Sleeping Beauty” and “La Fille Mal Gardée” excerpts were vehicles for the lead dancers Maria Kochetkova, Hee Seo, Veronika Part, Mr. Stearns, Isabella Boylston and Jeffrey Cirio, these dances all demonstrate that in 2016 Ballet Theater is presenting itself as a true company." (sorry no time to correct and make internal quotes singular)

I think that is what he is indicating. He may have something there.

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Cornejo danced Seven Sonatas Thursday night, so whatever ailed him Tuesday could not have been that serious. I have to agree with abatt about Ratmansky's Symposium. I found it tedious and without structure. I also agree that the music is not really amenable to dance. Tonight Jeffrey Cirio took Herman's role (the rest of the cast was the same as for the gala) and he really faded into the woodwork. OTOH,Seven Sonatas was beautifully performed. I have always been a fan of Sarah Lane, Herman, Veronika and Joey Gorak. But Hee Seo (whom I usually find incredibly dull) seems to have really improved. She looks far more assured in technique and lyricism. Blaine Hoven's performances have also been excellent. About 6 years ago I pegged him for big things but he was sidelined by injury for several years. This season, with leads in 2 Ratmansky ballets, I hope that maybe he will be promoted to soloist. As for Ratmansky's Firebird, I detest it. I have never seen a ballet that runs so counter to the music (both Fokine's version and Balanchine's are SO much better). Since I had just suffered through it on Monday, I decided to leave at the second intermission, at a high point.

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Wanted to note that on Wed evening, Abrera and Royal were superb in Seven Sonatas. Why is Royal still in the corps! I thought the rest of the cast of that ballet also danced beautifully, especially Shevchenko (spelling?). Luciana Paris, however, struggled with the demands of some of the choreography.

I thought Boylston did a great job with Firebird on Wed evening. She's a very high jumper, which is needed for this role. Also, whereas Misty merely marked some of the sliding movement of the choreography, Boylston did it full out. Now I need to wait until next season to see a much better version of Firebird at NYCB.

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Cornejo danced Seven Sonatas Thursday night, so whatever ailed him Tuesday could not have been that serious. I have to agree with abatt about Ratmansky's Symposium. I found it tedious and without structure. I also agree that the music is not really amenable to dance. Tonight Jeffrey Cirio took Herman's role (the rest of the cast was the same as for the gala) and he really faded into the woodwork. OTOH,Seven Sonatas was beautifully performed. I have always been a fan of Sarah Lane, Herman, Veronika and Joey Gorak. But Hee Seo (whom I usually find incredibly dull) seems to have really improved. She looks far more assured in technique and lyricism. Blaine Hoven's performances have also been excellent. About 6 years ago I pegged him for big things but he was sidelined by injury for several years. This season, with leads in 2 Ratmansky ballets, I hope that maybe he will be promoted to soloist. As for Ratmansky's Firebird, I detest it. I have never seen a ballet that runs so counter to the music (both Fokine's version and Balanchine's are SO much better). Since I had just suffered through it on Monday, I decided to leave at the second intermission, at a high point.

Actually, J Cirio was first cast but was replaced by Herman at the Gala only.

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I loved Ratmansky's Firebird! I'm surprised, because I've read so many mixed reviews so I wasn't sure how I'd feel about it, but I thought it was fantastic.

Maybe it helps that I've never seen any version of this ballet before so I have nothing to compare it to. Roman Zhurbin killed it today, as did Cassie Trenary. The whole cast received a standing ovation.

Seven Sonatas was lovely as always and I enjoyed the new ballet as well. Overall a great 1st round of Ratmansky. Now looking forward to round 2 tonight with the Shostakovich Trilogy.

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Job well done today by Tyler Maloney who danced alongside seasoned principals and soloists in Ranmansky's Serenade. So exciting that a new corps member had such an opportunity and proved he deserved a spot up there.

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This afternoon's Ratmansky triple bill had what looked to me like a very well-sold house--and it was a terrific afternoon at the ballet. The new Serenade After Plato's Symposium seemed to me very much to capture the feel of a male community in conversation and debate as the latter progresses through subtle shifts of mood and tone. The lone female figure comes from a different sphere--Diotima as priestess (which is what she is in The Symposium) rather than image of transcendence (which is what she talks about) though stll inaccessible. All of the solos, duets, and small groups emerged from the group and returned to it--at one point, solo even seemed to answer solo as if in confrontation. Though parts of the score are dancier than others (even a hint jazzy), one of the beauties of the ballet lies in the way it finds extended dance phrases in music that doesn't initially seem to invite dance. The result really does feel like a conversation at the same time as it is an enthralling ballet. I saw the cast with Cornejo, Forster, Scott, Hammoudi, Sebastian, Malone, and Gorak. "Second" cast or no every one of them danced with great distinctiveness--just when I thought one really stood out out for the particular fluidity, strength, and intensity of his dancing, another would show me something just as wonderful. I'll call Cornejo first among equals--and mention Sebastian who also got quite a warm reception from the audience. At the same performance Seo was lovely if perhaps not quite as distinctive. I think this is a major addition to ABT's repertory (as best one can judge from one viewing) and a wonderful ballet.

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Yes, the Serenade is brilliant and Drew summed it up. I saw the first cast and am glad to hear the second was wonderful as well. The Shostakovich Trilogy is also looking powerful, and wonderful. Wow, maybe Ratmansky can really turn ABt around. He has certainly brought something special out of the dancers. Very, very happy with these ballets.

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So I saw six Ratmansky ballets yesterday, and while there were some I absolutely loved, luckily there were none that I disliked! So I'm ranking them in the order of my preference:

1. Symphony #9: First of all the music of this is glorious. One of my favorite works by Shostakovich. The costuming is also beautiful. But the dancing last night was so very strong, from the corps members to the amazing five leads last night. Stella Abrera, Craig Salstein, Marcelo Gomes, Devon Teuscher and Herman Cornejo were all outstanding. By watching it, you would never know that Devon was filling in for the injured Polina. She was stunning. She and Marcelo melded together perfectly during their pas, with beautiful lines and gorgeous chemistry. And Herman Cornejo is so technically breathtaking to watch, he brought the house down everytime he came on stage. I can not put into words how much I loved this ballet, so good!

2. The Firebird: I expected to hate it and I loved it. Wish I could see it again. Trenary as the Maiden was a standout. She really attacks the choreography and I can't take my eyes off her. Zhurbin was a menacing Kaschei (honestly, it's a perfect role for him, he is such a strong actor and dancer!). Boylston was feisty and fiery. My only complaint was that at times, Hammoudi didn't feel like he was dancing as "all out" as the rest of the cast, but he had danced previously in Serenade after Plato's Symposium and was wonderful, so maybe fatigue played a role. I also want to mention the costumes and scenery, which I know some hate, but I thought they were completely magical. The only thing I wish was that the lighting was a little brighter. I was sitting in the back of the orchestra and couldn't see as well as I'd like.

3. Seven Sonatas: Stella Abrera and Calvin Royal, enough said.

4. Chamber Symphony: I thought Whiteside was a convincingly distraught Shostakovich. Lane, Boylston and Seo all did a fantastic job. And String Quartet # 8 in C minor (chamber symphony) is such a hauntingly beautiful piece of music. I've listened to this piece of music so much that it was nice to see it come alive before my eyes.

5. Serenade After Plato's Symposium: This is far down the list, but not because it was bad, but because I loved the four above it. I thought this was an interesting work, and I'd like to see it again. As others have said, hooray for Tyler Maloney. I couldn't tell he wasn't as experienced as his fellow dancers. The entire cast was great.

6. Piano Concerto #1: I was so floored by Symphony #9 and Chamber Symphony, that this was a little bit of a let down for me. Part of it was the casting. I know she is a fantastic dancer, but for some reason I just don't get Shevchenko. I know it's just me, but her dancing doesn't evoke much feeling for me. To be honest, I kept wishing it was Gillian performing. Simkin and Kochetkova were technically beautiful, but again for some reason I just don't get the same butterflies watching them as I do others. But I would definitely be happy to see this ballet again in the future.

All in all, an amazing day of ballet. I enjoyed all of the works, and still think Ratmansky is a blessing to have at ABT. Both matinee and evening performances were amazing, but I am especially proud of ABT for putting the Shostakovich trilogy together for the spring season again. It may not sell as well as Swan Lake, but it is a true work of art, and really showcases ABT dancers well. I just hope they put the three together again in future seasons, so I can experience it all over again.

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All in all, an amazing day of ballet. I enjoyed all of the works, and still think Ratmansky is a blessing to have at ABT. Both matinee and evening performances were amazing, but I am especially proud of ABT for putting the Shostakovich trilogy together for the spring season again. It may not sell as well as Swan Lake, but it is a true work of art, and really showcases ABT dancers well. I just hope they put the three together again in future seasons, so I can experience it all over again.

I totally agree about the courage of ABT to perform the Trilogy as a full evening's work. I've seen all three ballets out of context and they all work well that way, but when seen together, it's such an amazing experience. It may not sell like "Swan Lake", but as a complete evening of dance it's an astonishing achievement. Hopefully, ABT will keep it as a one night event. "Sym. #9" last night was beyond words. Gomes and Teuscher were cut from one piece of cloth. (she has "ballerina" written all over her). They were so "open" and expressive; revealing new depths to the choreography. Stella, the best I've seen her. Salstein showing new strength and energy. But Cornejo ruled the evening. 'nuff said! I also felt the Sat. PM cast for "Chamber Sym." was the stronger one. A very good role for Whiteside. "Piano Concerto#!" was great fun, but I felt the cast from Fri.PM was more invested in the work. The four leads on Fri. were Brandt (very fine), Shevchenko (stronger than on Sat.), and the two men were Gabe Shayer and Calvin Royal. What can you say about these two? Bravo to both. Bravo also to Ratmansky and to ABT.

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In Piano Concerto number 1 Sat night, Shevchenko and Kochetkova somehow didn't gel together effectively, and Simkin was a touch sloppy. Several years ago at the Koch theater I saw Piano Concero number 1 as a seperate ballet three times with two different casts including Shevchenko and Simkin (one of the most artistically convincing performances I had ever seen him give) and I loved the ballet -- possibly more each time I saw it. Last night it seemed off--even the slightly satirical but fun 'sport culture' formations didn't seem like the crisp vivid snapshots of a few years ago. The cast? The chemistry? The cavernous Met? Off night? Inadequate rehearsal? Hard for me to say, but I found it interesting to read other people's thoughts, and they seem to confirm for me that last night did not quite work. Too bad because it was my first time seeing the trilogy as a whole and I find it an intriguing and impressive accomplishment.

With some reservations/questions about the first movement I found Symphony number Nine especially compelling at the performance I saw. When Gomes lifted Teuscher up over his head and then held her up there with just one arm on her waist it seemed a poignant rewrite of spectacular Soviet partnering: as she arched backward over that arm she looked like a sacrifice. Throughout the ballet I thought Teuscher not only danced beautifully, but managed the undercurrents of disturbance and anxiety without a hint of excess or 'acting'-- and what clean long lines she has. It was fun to see the whole trilogy alongside Concerto DSCH Friday at NYCB too--it made for sort of a Shostakovich quartet. The companies may not have planned that, but it worked out very well. I am looking forward to seeing the trilogy again with a different cast on Monday.

Could not agree more with Kaysta about Trenary and Zhurbin in Firebird. As she said: they 'killed' it. I have always loved the Ratmansky Firebird and happy to report the company still looks great in it and I still love it. I find it beautiful, funny, strange, surprising--and I think I may even have teared up when the young men emerged from the trees which had been their prison. My companion--who likes ballet, but is not a fan--was seeing it for the first time; when the curtain came down, he looked at me and said "spectacular."

Both Trenary and Teuscher danced Saturday like ballerinas in the making.

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I was there Sat. night for Shostakovich Trilogy and guess my impressions were a bit different than some others. I found 3 Ratmansky/Shostakovich ballets in a row a bit much - Soviet angst with a cloud of impending doom, dark humor that sometimes went broad, and in each ballet - a smattering of flashy lifts and virtuoso dancing by the male of choice.

I liked the first ballet, Symphony #9, best but maybe I liked it because it was first. Ratmansky always move groups around very well and the corps is used to great effect in the piece. Port de bras or even the tilt of their heads sets or changes a tone. Marcelo Gomes' fluid movement quality and wonderful partnering were a pleasure (when he leaves ballet he could easily extend his career with other forms of dance if he chooses.) Cornejo's technique is awesome as always and he manages combine it with a stage presence that is warmly human.

In Chamber Symphony James Whiteside was the victim/suffering artist/composer and Lane, Boyslton, Seo were the women in his life. All danced well - nothing tugged at my heart strings. The audience seemed a bit deadened by it.

Piano Concerto #1 - Shevchenko replaced the injured Murphy and was technically assured and brimming with confidence. Maria Kochetkova flash around and across the stage with accuracy but was oddly generic. I guess that's my general impression of her. She gets the job done, whatever the job is, but isn't distinctive or compelling. The big surprise for me was Simkin. I'd been avoiding him because I felt his wunderkind kind of dancing had gone on for too long. Always a slight, boyish figure he seemed to value his own tricks above partnering or even paying attention to the woman we was dancing with. Last night he suddenly seemed mature to me. He's filled out some and muscled up - he partnered Kochetkova skillfully and payed attention to her. He can still dazzle with jumps and turns. Sterns held his own when dancing along side Simkin.

I don't know about the other levels of the Met but I was in the orchestra and there were so many empty seats that a lot of seat switching occurred! I spotted the couple that sat behind me, for the first ballet, somewhere else for the second and somewhere else yet again for the third. They are not the only ones.

Last word about the ABT Corps. I see NYCB a lot and this past year saw Pacific Northwest Ballet and Miami City Ballet. I will have to muse on this to be more specific but I feel with NYCB, PNB and NCB, the corps of each company has a kind of flavor that identifies them. ABT doesn't seem to have that.

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Last word about the ABT Corps. I see NYCB a lot and this past year saw Pacific Northwest Ballet and Miami City Ballet. I will have to muse on this to be more specific but I feel with NYCB, PNB and NCB, the corps of each company has a kind of flavor that identifies them. ABT doesn't seem to have that.

I've noticed there has been quite a bit of movement either into or out of the corps this year. Promotions to soloists leave places for newbies to fill. Many corps retirements also from last year. It takes time to find that special voice of the corps. I find that usually by mid season things have become more specific. But I did feel the corps for Chamber #9 was of a piece from start to end.

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I've noticed there has been quite a bit of movement either into or out of the corps this year. Promotions to soloists leave places for newbies to fill. Many corps retirements also from last year. It takes time to find that special voice of the corps. I find that usually by mid season things have become more specific. But I did feel the corps for Chamber #9 was of a piece from start to end.

I, too, agree with mimsyb about all the movement in the corps, many left last year and it seems many are injured? There are many new names in the programs, and after reading their bios I see they are quite new too, so maybe they just weren't given enough time to be trained properly as well, this to me is the fault of the AD!!!

I did attend the Saturday performance as well, and several dancers seemed to have been replaced? Not sure why but Fang and Hammrick were clearly missing from Piano since they were listed, but pleasantly replaced by one of the dancers my grand daughter aspires to, Waski! (Sorry to break the rules of BA about not naming any special dancer but since so many on this thread have added their own...) She has always impressed me in the times that I have seen her perform, my grand daughter follows her on social media and was fortunate to meet her after a show, she was very kind to us to give my aspiring dancer a few encouraging words. We hope to see more of her during this season :flowers: We were able to get seats closer, so it was nice to see faces and thought K. Williams, Waski and Giangeruso did a wonderful job as a group.

I know there will be many who will not agree with me on this, but Firebird is not a favorite, it was the costumes more than anything else! So cumbersome with the maidens hair pieces and dresses that at times they were just distracting us from seeing the individual dancers, and what is with the white hair on the females vs the male in white? No individuality for the women? Again, this is just IMO :)

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I thought the Trilogy was completely original In terms of both the choreography and the dramatic content. I've seen the pieces performed individually, but the overall impact and brilliance of the work is much stronger when all three works are shown on the same program. I suspect that, given the large number of empty seats, the Trilogy will not be revived again for some time. I saw both casts, but I felt that it didn't really matter which cast you saw. The brilliance of the work was not dependent on any particular dancer.

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