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Guggenheim Works and Process Fall 2015 Dance


kbarber

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Fall 2015 Season Schedule


Balanchine’s Harlequinade: Commedia dell’arte Explored Sun and Mon, Sept 20 and 21, 7 pm
New York City Ballet dancers perform excerpts from George Balanchine’s Harlequinade, a masterful two-act ballet in the commedia dell’arte style, prior to the New York City Ballet’s full presentation in October. Following the performance, Pacific Northwest Ballet Education Programs Manager and dance scholar Doug Fullington will moderate a discussion exploring Balanchine’s Harlequinade, which was choreographed in the spirit of Marius Petipa, in whose Les Millions d’Harlequinade he danced as a student.



BalletCollective Mon, Oct 19, 7 pm
BalletCollective founder, choreographer, and New York City Ballet dancer Troy Schumacher discusses the upcoming season at NYU Skirball Center. Dancers Harrison Coll, Lauren King, Claire Kretzschmar, Ashley Laracey, Meagan Mann, David Prottas, and Taylor Stanley, accompanied by musical ensemble Hotel Elefant, perform excerpts from a new work by Schumacher and BalletCollective resident composer Ellis Ludwig-Leone, inspired by commissioned photographs by Paul Maffi, and selections from a new Schumacher male duet with a score by NOW Ensemble Artistic Director Mark Dancigers, inspired by commissioned photographs by Dafyi Hagai.


Hagaromo Mon, Oct 26, 7 pm
Prior to the world premiere at the Brooklyn Academey of Music (BAM), as part of the 2015 Next Wave Festival, dancers Wendy Whelan and Jock Soto, director David Michalek, choreographer David Neumann, composer Nathan Davis, and puppeteer Chris Green discuss their reimagining the Japanese Noh theater classic Hagoromo. Excerpts are performed by Whelan and Soto, tenor Peter Tantsits, and International Contemporary Ensemble (ICE).


Daniil Simkin’s Intensio Sun, Nov 8, 7 pm
Prior to the New York premiere at the Joyce Theater, excerpts from Intensio, including four new works by choreographers Alexander Ekman, Gregory Dolbashian, Jorma Elo, and Annabelle Lopez Ochoa, are performed by Daniil Simkin and fellow American Ballet Theatre dancers Isabella Boylston, Alexandre Hammoudi, Blaine Hoven, Calvin Royal III, Hee Seo, Cassandra Trenary, and James Whiteside, as well as Les Ballets Jazz de Montréal’s Céline Cassone.


Broadway Dance Lab Sat, Nov 14, 7 pm
Broadway choreographer and Broadway Dance Lab (BDL) founder Josh Prince shares the culmination of BDL’s most recent eight-week session. Prince and choreographer Marcelo Gomes discuss their creative process with moderator Robert LaFosse and BDL’s ten dancers perform new works by Prince, Gomes, Camille A. Brown and others.


Juilliard Dance: New Dances
Sun, Nov 15, 7 pm
Juilliard Dance students perform excerpts from new works by four innovative choreographers prior to their premiere. Helen Simoneau’s piece features first-year dancers; Aszure Barton’s, second-year dancers; Zvi Gotheiner’s, third-year dancers; and Kyle Abraham’s, fourth-year dancers. Juilliard Dance Artistic Director Lawrence Rhodes discusses the creative process with the choreographers.



Paul Taylor Commissions: Doug Elkins & Larry Keigwin Sat and Sun, Nov 21 and 22, 7 pm
For the first time, as part of choreographer Paul Taylor’s significant new commissioning initiative, new creations by some of the most compelling voices of the next generation will be choreographed for dancers of the Paul Taylor Dance Company. Choreographers Doug Elkins and Larry Keigwin participate in a discussion moderated by Paul Taylor–biographer Suzanne Carbonneau. Excerpts of the new works are performed alongside Taylor classics.


Inspired Collaborations: Emily Coates & Sarah Demers Mon, Nov 30, 7 pm
Yale dance professor and former New York City Ballet dancer Emily Coates and Yale physics professor and particle physicist Sarah Demers discuss their inspired collaboration in the classroom that has led to many inventive outcomes. Coates and Demers demonstrate how their interdisciplinary projects can expand the creative boundaries of both their fields.



Location:
Peter B. Lewis Theater, unless otherwise noted
Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum
1071 Fifth Avenue at 89th Street
Subway: 4, 5, 6 train to 86th Street
Bus: M1, M2, M3, or M4 bus on Madison or Fifth Avenue

Tickets:
$40, $35 members, unless otherwise noted
$10 student rush tickets available one hour prior to each performance if space allows (for students under 25 with valid ID).
Priority ticket access and preferred seat selection starting August 12, 2015, for Friends of Works & Process or Guggenheim Members Associate level and above.
Season tickets will be on sale August 24, 2015.
Specific seats may be reserved when ordered online.
For more information, call 212 758 0024 or 212 423 3587, Mon–Fri, 1–5 pm, or visit worksandprocess.org

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What an amazing evening! Dancers from both NYCB amd PNWB participated. I especially loved the chance to compare the A2 Columbine "Berceuse" solos...Petipa's faster paced 'cuter' version vs Balanchine's softer, more mature edition...spectacularly performed by Tiler Peck. Kudos, too, to PNWB's Angelica Generosa demonstrating the ultra-difficult Petipa version, as danced by Preobrajenskaya (who took-on the role of Columbine after Kchessinskaya).

Doug Fullington truly outdid himself here. All six dancers were fantastic. Six excerpts from HARLEQUINADE were spotlighted/compared, plus the "Harlequin dolls" dance from A1 of Lev Ivanov's NITCRACKER.

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I believe that the internet (streaming, YouTube, etc.) has spoiled all of us. Not so long ago, the only way for people living outside cities with world-class arts was to get one's butt on a plane or train or bus and actually ATTEND the event live. Shocker!

I suspect that our old 'friends' at the Balanchine Trust may have had something to do with nixing the streaming of this event. Just a guess.

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Then it gravitated to PBS in the 1970s and 80s and then slowly started to disappear.

It's vaguely irritating to watch Paula Kerger's fundraising pitch enumerating the transformative experiences people have had watching PBS programs, when she mentions that for her it was seeing New York City Ballet on Dance in America. She couldn't use her influence to get NYCB back on Dance in America? It's been a while.

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(This should be public-facing, because I logged out of Facebook and still could see it.)

Doug Fullington posted this photo with at least part of his cast:

https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10154186714933496&set=a.10150339881258496.419104.611483495&type=1&theater

I recognize the three left-most people: Gonzalo Garcia, Kyle Davis, Angelica Generosa. Is that Tiler Peck next to Generosa? Justin Peck next to Doug?

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I wonder how the streams so far have been funded. Right now I think the only American arts organization with a substantial videostreaming program is the Detroit Symphony Orchestra, with about 25 live streams per season. It's one of the reasons they market themselves as "the most accessible orchestra on the planet." Theirs is a much more complex operation--HD video stream, remote-controlled cameras and, of course, good recorded sound--so I'm sure it costs a lot more than Works and Process to stream, but the DSO couldn't do it without substantial outside funding, as they acknowledge themselves.

Live from Orchestra Hall webcasts are presented by the Ford Motor Company Fund and made possible by generous support from The John S. and James L. Knight Foundation.

http://www.dso.org/live.aspx

The video archive of performances is available only to orchestra donors.

http://www.dso.org/page.aspx?page_id=932

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No doubt that is why the DSO's concert archive, unlike its live streams, is not available free of charge. The Ford and Knight money pays for the one-offs, while the rank-and-file donor money helps to keep the streams available on demand for, as they say, up to three years. (I think such a performance archive is a pretty good incentive to donate.) Much of what the orchestra plays, but not everything, is already in the public domain, but there's the still the matter of reaching agreements with the musicians. Still, they've managed to do it, and I'm sure there's a lot other organizations could learn from their model.

Paid services are not immune to rights problems. The Vienna State Opera's live streaming site is a pay-per-view service, but last season one of the operas I had hoped to watch, one not yet in the public domain, was canceled "due to unfulfillable claims by the editors."

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Just confirmed with Works and Process (via Twitter):

No live streams for the current season. But, "[We] will be sharing video excerpts of many of this season's performances. Stay tuned for more information."

I will indeed stay tuned. A post-event video is fine by me so long as it captures a decent chunk of the proceedings.

I'm sure this is news to no one, but just in case, Works and Process has a YouTube channel where they archive videos of previous programs.

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Just confirmed with Works and Process (via Twitter):

No live streams for the current season. But, "[We] will be sharing video excerpts of many of this season's performances. Stay tuned for more information."

I will indeed stay tuned. A post-event video is fine by me so long as it captures a decent chunk of the proceedings.

I'm sure this is news to no one, but just in case, Works and Process has a YouTube channel where they archive videos of previous programs.

Sorry to hear about no live streams, but would be happy for anything we can get. And it never hurts to remind people about a YouTube channel, or other online resource -- there are so many different places with dance content now, it's easy to lose track.

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