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ABT 2016 Met Season


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They're really clamping down this year and it makes no sense for them to alienate their subscriber base.

No, it makes no sense at all, not in our day of increasingly generous subscriber benefits. Why wouldn't ABT want to bank as much money in advance as possible? Is it the siren song of dynamic pricing?

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Interesting to read all these comments. NYSusan, so nice of them to offer to keep your $30 as a donation. Are they kidding! They will definitely lose some of my business due to frustration and anger. This new policy should have been spelled out long ago, and not for the first time on the ticket exchange line. It is a seismic shift from prior years, and ABT should have made this policy clear in the brochure.

FYI, The brochure indicates that dynamic pricing starts on March 27 (unless of course they have changed that policy without notice too).

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FYI, The brochure indicates that dynamic pricing starts on March 27 (unless of course they have changed that policy without notice too).

If ABT applies the policy honestly, and sales have been slow, in part because subscribers were limited in their ability to buy advance tickets, there should be no grounds for raising prices on March 27. :innocent:

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Perhaps they're saving the "Lane slot" for Kochetkova as Aurora? That's more likely than saving it for Copeland. The entire situation with Lane is bizarre and sad. I also would have expected her to have a possible Juliet debut at Wolf Trap in July but that isn't happening.

About the TBD for Hee Seo's partner in SB, I have a secret wish for that to be Kim Kimin. All-Korean power pair, oh yeah! :)

Just noted in the Mariinsky website that Hee seo will dance Aurora with V. Skylarov at the april 8,2016 MIB Festival performance of Sleeping beauty. Maybe, he is the TBD?

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If ABT applies the policy honestly, and sales have been slow, in part because subscribers were limited in their ability to buy advance tickets, there should be no grounds for raising prices on March 27. :innocent:

I agree, but of course once the out of towners who are not regular attendees of ABT get involved, the going rate for seats will be whatever ABT wants to charge. It's pretty sad when the powers that be make these kinds of decisions. It really only alienates the loyal subscribers more. What's their problem with getting in more money up front, early, and knowing the house will be more completely sold? I don't get it. I will happily spend my money across the Plaza at NYCB.

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I resent the idea that ABT places so little value on the time of its subscribers. This means that as a subscriber, you need to wait once on the subscriber exchange line during priority week, and a second time on the line for single ticket purchases once the public on sale date occurs if you wish to add additional dates. You need to accomplish all this on or before March 26, because they raise the prices on March 27. (*By the way, it is my understanding that you cannot exchange subscriber tickets during the first week of public single ticket sales, so that if you're a subscriber, you have no choice but to wait in line twice if you want all of your exchanges and single ticket purchases to be completed by the magical price increase date of March 27.)

In addition to the reasons articulated above about banking money as soon as possible, the new policy makes no sense for other reasons. When they take your money as a donation because you've exchanged into a cheaper section, ABT does NOT get that donation money. (See NY Susan's entry, above, where they would not let her use the price difference for an additional ticket, but instead suggested that she give the money to the Met as a donation.) That donation is a donation to the Met Opera. Is ABT looking to increase the donations to the Met Opera instead of allowing people to buy additional ABT tickets with the monetary difference? Additionally, when you pay internet ticketing fees those fees again do not go to ABT. They go to the Met Opera. So to the extent that subscribers take to the internet or phone to buy their additional tickets next week, none of those handling fees are going to ABT.

ABT should be careful what it wishes for. If they want subcribers to stay within the same number of tickets that they originally purchased on subscription, their wish will be granted. There are certain dates that I would have bought singles for but I'm now so pissed off they will be permanently deleted from the list of dates I intend to buy.

Considering that there is no discount whatsoever when you buy a subscription, plus you have to pay a subscription handling fee, I'm wondering whether going forward it makes sense to only buy single tickets, and not bother with the subscriptions. At least you only have to wait in line once.

The folks within the ABT administration did not think this one through, and this is going ot backfire.

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Abatt, that is the conclusion I've reached. No significant advantage to a subscription. I like to pick my own seats. I also don't like the ambiguous wording they used regarding the availability of early purchase for single seats, just like I don't like how they have worded rehearsal benefits for members. And when you compare ABT to how City Ballet runs things, it's even starker. If I have extra money, I would rather raise my membership level at NYCB. Frankly, given the Board and contributors to ABT and their sponsored dancers, it doesn't seem to me ABT needs money from me or anyone else with a net worth below $10 million.

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I resent the idea that ABT places so little value on the time of its subscribers. This means that as a subscriber, you need to wait once on the subscriber exchange line during priority week, and a second time on the line for single ticket purchases once the public on sale date occurs if you wish to add additional dates. You need to accomplish all this on or before March 26, because they raise the prices on March 27.

In addition to the reasons articulated above about banking money as soon as possible, the new policy makes no sense for other reasons. When they take your money as a donation because you've exchanged into a cheaper section, ABT does NOT get that donation money. (See NY Susan's entry, above, where they would not let her use the price difference for an additional ticket, but instead suggested that she give the money to the Met as a donation.) That donation is a donation to the Met Opera. Is ABT looking to increase the donations to the Met Opera instead of allowing people to buy additional ABT tickets with the monetary difference? Additionally, when you pay internet ticketing fees those fees again do not go to ABT. They go to the Met Opera. So to the extent that subscribers take to the internet or phone to buy their additional tickets next week, none of those handling fees are going to ABT.

ABT should be careful what it wishes for. If they want subcribers to stay within the same number of tickets that they originally purchased on subscription, their wish will be granted. There are certain dates that I would have bought singles for but I'm now so pissed off they will be permanently deleted from the list of dates I intend to buy.

Considering that there is no discount whatsoever when you buy a subscription, plus you have to pay a subscription handling fee, I'm wondering whether going forward it makes sense to only buy single tickets, and not bother with the subscriptions. At least you only have to wait in line once.

The folks within the ABT administration did not think this one through, and this is going ot backfire.

Interesting, Abatt that you say this. Years ago before I became a subscriber, I usually stood in line to buy single seats and almost always came away with great seats. It was a one time standee time allocation. Then I became a subscriber partly because of the exchange privilege, but also because I could add on the singles. Usually by MArch I know my schedule going forward into the Summer, which I don't know in December and thus know what performances I can now attend. Also, usually by March the casting has become more solidified (not always) and I could base my choices on that. Plus, I have found that by going to the box office (either to exchange or buy additional seats) I have always gotten better seats than were assigned to me with my subscription. No matter how many times I request perhaps a better location, it's always the same. My point is that I'm finding fewer and fewer reasons to be a subscriber. As noted, there's no up front discount on a subscription and now there are even fewer "perks" to warrant putting up money in advance. And at my age I really don't need any prestige to the fact that I'm a "subscriber". I still love to see good ballet, but really hate being made to feel as if I, as a subscriber don't really matter. Also, the policy of "donations" at the BO going to the Met is truly odious. In not being able to buy the additional seats last Sunday, I reassessed and decided against about five I would have bought. I sit in the Grand Tier, so anyone can do the math on what money is lost to ABT. In future, I really need to examine if I want to continue as a subscriber under this current policy. ABT's loss.

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I've been reading this thread on subscriptions with great interest -- and bewilderment! Anybody who has read Michael Kaiser's books or who just looks around the country at the treatment of subscribers elsewhere can see how misguided ABT's approach is. PNB, San Francisco, NYCB, Pennsylvania, Colorado, etc., etc., etc. - subscribers get all sorts of really nice perks for this day and age. Keeping the same seats from year-to-year is pretty far down on the list. Rather, discounts on tickets for the subscriptions and additional tickets. Early buying opportunities for additional tickets. Exchange privileges. Receptions. Events. Nice incentives for many of us, even if it means buying tickets for a program I'd otherwise skip.

At least according to Kaiser, subscriptions just a few decades ago accounted for over 50% of an audience and brought in important cash flow early on before the season. But that has been in steep decline for a long time. You almost wonder if ABT is trying to depress their subscription base in hopes of leaving more seats for dynamic pricing down the road! I tried a trio subscription with ABT a few years ago and realized it was essentially worthless, so I'm back to single ticket purchases on-line, which work fine in a house that big.

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These thoughts are why I pick single seats out online the day the box office opens. Good seats are always available. I subscribe at NYCB, because they have subscriber friendly benefits, but I will never subscribe to ABT until they change their antiquated policies.

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I think that ABT was, indeed, trying to minimize and depress single ticket purchases before March 27, when dynamic pricing goes into effect so that they could make more money per ticket once they jack up the prices. I bet a large segment of the ticket buyimg public has no clue that prices will increase on March 27. Since subscribers tend to be more in tune to the rules and regs of ABT pricing and policies than the casual ticket buyer, it is surprising that ABT would play this game with its most loyal customers. ABT's motives are, in my opinion, pretty transparent.

The funny thing is that none of the dates I was interested in adding are "hot" tickets. I think that the only things that will actually increase on Mar 27 are the Ferri R&J and any performance involving Misty Copeland. Perhaps the Vishneva R&J, but I'm not even sure about that.

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I think that ABT was, indeed, trying to minimize and depress single ticket purchases before March 27, when dynamic pricing goes into effect so that they could make more money per ticket once they jack up the prices. I bet a large segment of the ticket buyimg public has no clue that prices will increase on March 27. Since subscribers tend to be more in tune to the rules and regs of ABT pricing and policies than the casual ticket buyer, it is surprising that ABT would play this game with its most loyal customers. ABT's motives are, in my opinion, pretty transparent.

The funny thing is that none of the dates I was interested in adding are "hot" tickets. I think that the only things that will actually increase on Mar 27 are the Ferri R&J and any performance involving Misty Copeland. Perhaps the Vishneva R&J, but I'm not even sure about that.

I agree. Not many "hot tickets" other than the ones you mentioned. Happily, I did get a subscription which included the Ferri performance. As for the others, not much interest in them whatsoever. Zero interest in Misty. I leave that to her screaming minions. I hope her fans understand they will have to sit through two other ballets before they can see her "Firebird". Bring on the dynamic pricing!

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For me, sitting through the Ratmansky Firebird is a painful experience no matter who is performing. I did not like that ballet at all. I'm buying one ticket to that program so I can see the new Ratmansky ballet and Seven Sonatas. I considered buying an additional performance of that program, with an alternate cast, but now that is off the table. Not happening under any circumstance.

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Have been reading this thread and all I can think of is: Penny Wise Pound Foolish! Same reason why I am like a few on BA, and since I am in the area, to wait till I get to the theater to take my chances for some shows, I do feel bad for those whom have to travel a distance... just get disappointed! :(

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I used to hold two Orchestra subscriptions for ages, but cancelled them four years ago, when I realized that I would fare much better by just going to the BO and purchasing the seats I want myself (because of my bad knee I am very particular about the location of my seats)

Once I started buying single tickets instead of subscriptions I also realized that I didn't need to see as many performances as I used to. Every performance became a debate, and quite often the frugal and the lazy sides of me won.

Nowadays it's down to really a couple of performances per Met season. I don't care for Ratmansky and will never pay even a dime to see his choreography. I'm not a fan of neither Misty, nor Hee. I also happen to think that dancers come out of retirement for reasons that are rather financial than artistic, and thus more often than not simply embarrass themselves.

Where does all this leave me exactly for the upcoming season? Maybe a Part. Maybe a Semionova. Maybe a Vishneva/Gomes. But that's about it. Kick the dynamic prices in and I'd much rather spend the dough on a nice dinner followed by a night in front of TV watching my favorite ballerina of yesteryear and today on blu-ray.

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Does anyone think this new policy relates to scalping issues? I have no doubt that certain shows will end up on Stub Hub for 4 or 5 times the actual ticket price. But if they are trying to prevent scalping, isn't thare a better way than treating your subscribers poorly?

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I can't imagine ABT tickets would have many takers at scalpers' prices, not when the Met is so far from sold out on most nights.

If it is a problem, I think the best solution is the one used by the Royal Opera House, which resells unwanted tickets on behalf of the original purchaser minus a very small administrative fee (£2). Then there's no need to go to a third-party site to try to unload tickets and recoup costs. Mind you, the ROH re-sells tickets "ONLY if there are no more tickets available in that part of the theatre or in that price band." In other words, since ABT shows seldom sell out, it would be a moot point for most performances.

http://www.roh.org.uk/visit/tickets#re-sale

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Zero interest in Misty. I leave that to her screaming minions. I hope her fans understand they will have to sit through two other ballets before they can see her "Firebird".

I will miss Copeland in Firebird but am interested in seeing her in Fille--never thought of myself as a "screaming minion" though.

Edited to add that I've never had any problem with fans cheering Copeland...or any other ABT ballerina come to think of it.

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For me, sitting through the Ratmansky Firebird is a painful experience no matter who is performing. I did not like that ballet at all. I'm buying one ticket to that program so I can see the new Ratmansky ballet and Seven Sonatas. I considered buying an additional performance of that program, with an alternate cast, but now that is off the table. Not happening under any circumstance.

I agree about "Firebird". Not for me, no matter who performs. So the good news is that it is being performed last on the program, so if I wanted to see the new Ratmansky I can always leave before "Firebird". But that would mean spending $$$ for only a partial program. My guess is that if this new ballet gets fair to rave reviews it will be repeated in the Fall Season at the State Theater, where the tickets aren't quite so expensive and the sight lines are better. So this is yet another example of a ticket I would have purchased had I been able to, but now re- thought it and have crossed it off my roster.

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I will miss Copeland in Firebird but am interested in seeing her in Fille--never thought of myself as a "screaming minion" though.

Edited to add that I've never had any problem with fans cheering Copeland...or any other ABT ballerina come to think of it.

I can only remember her performance of "Swan Lake" last season which had her fans making quite a bit of noise *talking, cheering, etc. And this was before she had even danced a step!!) In the white pas when things are supposed to be sublime, tender, emotional all I heard was constant clapping (in many wrong places) and again loud talking. And the black pas was almost like a Dancing With the Stars Night. I'm all for diversity and if not now, when, etc. But I also go to the ballet to be moved and "changed" by a performance. When there are distractions, etc. it becomes an entirely different experience. MO

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Press release:

AMERICAN PREMIERE OF ALEXEI RATMANSKY’S

THE GOLDEN COCKEREL AND WORLD PREMIERE OF

NEW RATMANSKY WORK TO HIGHLIGHT

AMERICAN BALLET THEATRE’S

2016 SPRING SEASON AT METROPOLITAN OPERA HOUSE,

MAY 9-JULY 2, 2016

SEASON TO FEATURE RATMANSKY FESTIVAL AND REVIVAL

OF FREDERICK ASHTON’S LA FILLE MAL GARDÉE

GUEST ARTIST ALESSANDRA FERRI AND EXCHANGE ARTIST

XANDER PARISH SCHEDULED TO PERFORM

PRINCIPAL DANCERS STELLA ABRERA AND GILLIAN MURPHY TO CELEBRATE 20 YEARS WITH COMPANY

BOX OFFICE OPENS MARCH 20 AT 12 NOON

American Ballet Theatre’s 2016 Spring season will be highlighted by a World Premiere work by Alexei Ratmansky, the American Premiere of Ratmansky’s The Golden Cockerel and a revival of Frederick Ashton’s La Fille mal gardée. Tickets for ABT’s Spring Season at the Metropolitan Opera House go on sale at the box office on Sunday, March 20 at 12 Noon.

Principal Dancers for the 2016 Metropolitan Opera House season include Stella Abrera, Roberto Bolle, Isabella Boylston, Misty Copeland, Herman Cornejo, Marcelo Gomes, Maria Kochetkova, Alban Lendorf, Gillian Murphy, Veronika Part, Polina Semionova, Hee Seo, Daniil Simkin, Cory Stearns, Diana Vishneva and James Whiteside.

Former American Ballet Theatre Principal Dancer Alessandra Ferri will perform as a Guest Artist on Thursday evening, June 23 in the role of Juliet in Romeo and Juliet for the first time since her retirement from the Company in 2007. Xander Parish of the Mariinsky Ballet will debut with the Company as an Exchange Artist. Parish will dance

the role of Aminta in Frederick Ashton’s Sylvia at the matinee on Wednesday, May 11 and Saturday evening, May 14. Principal Dancers Stella Abrera and Gillian Murphy will also celebrate their 20th anniversary of performances with the Company.

2016 Spring Gala Performance and World Premiere

American Ballet Theatre’s 2016 Spring Gala will be held during the second week of the Met season on Monday, May 16 at 6:30 P.M. The Gala performance will include a World Premiere by Alexei Ratmansky, set to Leonard Bernstein’s Serenade after Plato’s Symposium, Ratmansky’s Firebird and excerpts from the season’s repertoire. For information on ABT’s 2016 Spring Gala, please call the Special Events Office at 212-477-3030, ext. 3310.

All-Ratmansky Festival

The second week of American Ballet Theatre’s Spring season, May 17-23, will feature two repertory programs of works choreographed by Alexei Ratmansky. The first program, Ratmansky’s 2013 Shostakovich Trilogy, features the choreographer’s Symphony #9, Chamber Symphony and Piano Concerto #1. Shostakovich Trilogy will be given four performances, May 17, 20, 21 evening and 23. A triple bill of Ratmansky works, featuring the Ratmansky/Bernstein premiere, Seven Sonatas (2009) and Firebird (2012), will have four performances, May 18 matinee and evening, May 19 and the matinee of May 21.

American Premiere

Alexei Ratmansky’s The Golden Cockerel will receive its American Premiere on Monday evening, June 6, 2016 with Veronika Part (Queen of Shemakah) and Skylar Brandt (the Golden Cockerel) leading the first cast. Set to music by Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov, arranged by Yannis Samprovalakis, with sets and costumes by Richard Hudson, Ratmansky’s The Golden Cockerel is inspired by Michel Fokine’s 1914 production for the Ballet Russes.

Based on Alexander Pushkin’s folktale, The Golden Cockerel was first presented on May 21, 1914 at the Théâtre Nationale de l’Opera, Paris, with choreography by

Michel Fokine and scenery and costumes by Natalia Goncharova. Ratmansky’s choreography for The Golden Cockerel received its World Premiere by the Royal Danish Ballet on September 29, 2012 at the Copenhagen Opera House, Denmark. Ann Holm-Jensen Peyk will assist in the staging of the ballet for ABT.

Revival

Frederick Ashton’s La Fille mal gardée returns to the repertory on Tuesday evening, May 24 for eight performances through Monday, May 30. Set to music by Ferdinand Hérold, freely adapted and arranged by John Lanchbery from the 1828 version, La Fille mal gardée features designs by Osbert Lancaster, a scenario by Jean Dauberval and lighting by Brad Fields. Isabella Boylston and Jeffrey Cirio will dance the leading roles of Lise and Colas in the ballet’s first performance of the season on May 24. Gillian Murphy will celebrate her 20th Anniversary with ABT at the evening performance on Saturday, May 28. La Fille mal gardée received its World Premiere by The Royal Ballet at the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden, London on January 28, 1960, danced by Nadia Nerina (Lise), David Blair (Colas), Alexander Grant (Alain) and Stanley Holden (Widow Simone). The ballet received its United States Premiere by The Royal Ballet at the Metropolitan Opera House, New York on September 14, 1960, danced by the same cast.

La Fille mal gardée received its American Ballet Theatre Company Premiere at the Metropolitan Opera House, New York on May 31, 2002, danced by Ashley Tuttle (Lise) and Ethan Stiefel (Colas). Last performed by ABT in 2003, the ballet will be staged for the Company by Malin Thoors.

Full-Length Ballets

American Ballet Theatre will present five additional full-length ballets during its 2016 Spring season.

Gillian Murphy, Marcelo Gomes and James Whiteside will dance the leading roles in the season’s first performance of Ashton’s Sylvia on Monday evening, May 9. A ballet in three acts, Sylvia is set to music by Léo Delibes and features costumes and scenery after original designs by Robin and Christopher Ironside. Additional designs for

Sylvia are by Peter Farmer and lighting is by Mark Jonathan. The World Premiere of the original production of Sylvia was given by The Royal Ballet on September 3, 1952 at the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden, London, danced by Margot Fonteyn (Sylvia), Michael Somes (Aminta), John Hart (Orion) and Alexander Grant (Eros). The World Premiere of this revival of Sylvia by was given by The Royal Ballet on November 4, 2004 at the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden, danced by Darcey Bussell (Sylvia), Jonathan Cope (Aminta), Thiago Soares (Orion) and Martin Harvey (Eros). Sylvia received its American Ballet Theatre Company Premiere at the Metropolitan Opera House, New York on June 3, 2005, danced by Gillian Murphy (Sylvia), Maxim

Beloserkovsky (Aminta), Marcelo Gomes (Orion) and Herman Cornejo (Eros). Sylvia was last performed by ABT in 2013.

The season’s first performance of Le Corsaire on Tuesday, May 31 features Maria Kochetkova, Herman Cornejo, Sarah Lane, Daniil Simkin and Jeffrey Cirio in the leading roles. Based on the Lord Byron poem “The Corsair” (1814), the ballet features choreography by Konstantin Sergeyev after Marius Petipa, and staging by Anna-Marie Holmes after Petipa and Sergeyev, with music by Adolphe Adam, Cesare Pugni, Léo Delibes, Riccardo Drigo and Prince Oldenbourg. Scenery and costumes are by Irina Tibilova, with additional costume designs by Robert Perdziola and lighting by Mary Jo Dondlinger. Le Corsaire received its Company Premiere by American Ballet Theatre on June 19, 1998 with Nina Ananiashvili (Medora), Giuseppe Picone (Conrad), Ashley Tutttle (Gulnare), Angel Corella (Birbanto), Jose Manuel Carréno (Ali, the slave) and Vladimir Malakhov (Lankendem).

Eight performances of Swan Lake, choreographed by Kevin McKenzie after Marius Petipa and Lev Ivanov, will be given beginning Monday, June 13 with Polina Semionova and Marcelo Gomes leading the opening night cast. Swan Lake is set to the score by Peter Ilyitch Tchaikovsky and features scenery and costumes by Zack Brown and lighting by Duane Schuler. This production of Swan Lake premiered on March 24, 2000 at the Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts in Washington, D.C. with Julie Kent (Odette-Odile), Angel Corella (Prince Siegfried) and Marcelo Gomes (von Rothbart).

Kenneth MacMillan’s Romeo and Juliet will be given eight performances beginning Monday evening, June 20 with Hee Seo and Cory Stearns in the title roles. Set

to the score by Sergei Prokofiev, Romeo and Juliet features scenery and costumes by Nicholas Georgiadis and lighting by Thomas Skelton. Romeo and Juliet received its World Premiere by The Royal Ballet in London on February 9, 1965 and was given its ABT Company Premiere at the Metropolitan Opera House on April 22, 1985 with Leslie Browne and Robert La Fosse in the leading roles.

Last season’s World Premiere production of Alexei Ratmansky’s The Sleeping Beauty returns to the Metropolitan Opera House for eight performances beginning Monday evening, June 27 with Isabella Boylston and Joseph Gorak in the leading roles. Stella Abrera will debut in the role of Aurora on Thursday evening, June 30. The performance will also celebrate Abrera’s 20th Anniversary with ABT. Set to the classic score by Peter Ilyitch Tchaikovsky, The Sleeping Beauty has choreography by Marius Petipa and staging and additional choreography by Alexei Ratmansky, with assistance by Tatiana Ratmansky. The production features scenery and costumes by Tony Award®-winning designer Richard Hudson. Hudson’s designs are based on the historic work of Léon Bakst, who created a seminal version of The Sleeping Beauty for Serge Diaghilev’s Ballets Russes in 1921. The Sleeping Beauty received its World Premiere on March 3, 2015 at Segerstrom Center for the Arts in Costa Mesa, California, danced by Diana Vishneva (Princess Aurora) and Marcelo Gomes (Prince Désiré).

ABTKids

ABTKids, American Ballet Theatre’s annual one-hour introduction to ballet for young audience members and their families, is scheduled for Saturday morning,

June 11 at 11:30 A.M. The performance is recommended for children ages 4-12, and features child-friendly highlights from the season’s repertoire. All tickets for ABTKids are $25.

ABTKids Workshop Series

ABTKids pre-performance workshops, one-hour activity-based programs led by ABT Teaching Artists, are available to ABTKids ticket holders, 12 and under, on

Saturday, June 11 (9:30 A.M.) and to matinee ticket holders on Saturday, June 4

(11:00 A.M.) and Saturday, June 18 (11:00 A.M.). Saturday workshops will be held in the rehearsal studios of the Metropolitan Opera House. Tickets are $20 and available only to

ticket holders to the performance following the workshop. For tickets and more information on the ABTKids Workshop series, please visit www.abt.org/education/workshops.asp.

Individual tickets for American Ballet Theatre’s 2016 Spring Season at the Metropolitan Opera House, on sale beginning Sunday, March 20 at 12:00 Noon, are available at the Met box office, by phone at 212-362-6000, or online at ABT’s website www.abt.org. Tickets start at $20. The Metropolitan Opera House is located on Broadway between 64th and 65th streets in New York City.

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If Parish is an exchange artist, then who at ABT is the exchange dancer? And, since he's only doing Sylvia, I wonder which dancers will fill the 3 TBA's in Corsaire?

They've made it official now on their site that Simkin is doing Romeo w/ Copeland on June 25. I realize Simkin is a principal, but I feel bad for Gorak that he's losing that role this season.

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Hee Seo is the exchange artist. As noted somewhere in this thread, Hee Seo will perform Aurora next month at the Mariinsky, with Shkylarov as Prince Desire and Kondaurova as Lilac.

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