Jump to content
aqualia2008

Mikhailovsky US tour 2016

Recommended Posts

Saw the Saturday evening (Nov. 19) perf. of Le Corsaire at Costa Mesa. I was a bit taken aback to find the production not starting with the familiar shipwreck scene etc., a scene which enriches the ballet dramatically as well as providing a production with a chance to strut its stuff in theater-craft and wow the audience. I was then disoriented to find the quondam Ali the slave role much much reduced and the choreography scrambled, the Pas d'Esclave gone from Act II.  Needless to state, ballet is not a history lesson; but, gee whiz, the pirates' ship seemed to be a Spanish galleon from the 1500s (corsairs would have used not only a much later ship but also a much much lighter and less bulky one), the drop showed a map from the reign of James II (reigned 1685-1688), and if I'm not mistaken the action of the piece is supposed to be taking place around 1800-1820.  The set and dancing in this production seemed very tight and claustrophobic on our notoriously (and wonderfully) big Segerstrom stage. That said, I very much enjoyed the show; and Vasiliev gave his characteristically exuberant performance. But he wasn't just self-involved; he consciously bonds with the audience:  I'm sure I'm not the only person in the audience whom he locked eyes with during the performance. This is generous in a dancer and serves to spread and intensify the spirit of the event on both sides of the proscenium. At the end, I thought the curtain calls were over and stepped away; but I heard at least two loud roars behind me as I walked through the front of the house, and am consumed with curiosity as to what I missed.  Can anyone tell me?

Share this post


Link to post

When going out for curtain calls in front of the curtain with Ekaterina Borchenko, Vasiliev did a scissor-split jete and the audience went berserk.  This happened three times, with Borchenko jete-ing out to the front of the curtain on the third occasion.  Though I would not run to the theatre to see Vasiliev dance and would have loved to seen Leonid Sarafanov as Conrad instead, there's no denying that Vasiliev is highly entertaining and a true stage animal.  I personally prefer watching technique such as an occasional fifth position and turnout instead of gymnastics without much line, but others feel differently.

 

  I saw Friday and Saturday nights, where the only change in casting was in the pas de deux in Act I with Victor Lebedev (charismatic, wonderful dancer with expressive port de bras, I agree with MadameP above) and Mikho Naotsuka on Friday night, and the 19-year-old American Julian MacKay (amazing polish from such a young dancer, he should have a terrific career in front of him) and Irina Zhalovskaya, who has extraordinary control in turns. 

 

Ekaterina Borchenko's performance as Medora on Saturday had more warmth than on Friday. She is a beautiful woman and looks the regal ballerina.  It was a pleasure seeing 32 single fouettes, which I think are more rigorous  than the multiple fouettes where you releve less times and can go at your own speed.    I loved Anastasia Soboleva as Gulnare, who only dances in Act III.  She was  charming, mischievous, delightful, effortless in her dancing, and musical - a complete delight.

 

Though I am not a Le Corsaire fan, the dancers were totally committed to the fluff and gave it their all.  The audience lapped it up. 

Share this post


Link to post
42 minutes ago, Josette said:

When going out for curtain calls in front of the curtain with Ekaterina Borchenko, Vasiliev did a scissor-split jete and the audience went berserk.  This happened three times, with Borchenko jete-ing out to the front of the curtain on the third occasion.  Though I would not run to the theatre to see Vasiliev dance and would have loved to seen Leonid Sarafanov as Conrad instead, there's no denying that Vasiliev is highly entertaining and a true stage animal.  I personally prefer watching technique such as an occasional fifth position and turnout instead of gymnastics without much line, but others feel differently.

 

  I saw Friday and Saturday nights, where the only change in casting was in the pas de deux in Act I with Victor Lebedev (charismatic, wonderful dancer with expressive port de bras, I agree with MadameP above) and Mikho Naotsuka on Friday night, and the 19-year-old American Julian MacKay (amazing polish from such a young dancer, he should have a terrific career in front of him) and Irina Zhalovskaya, who has extraordinary control in turns. 

 

Ekaterina Borchenko's performance as Medora on Saturday had more warmth than on Friday. She is a beautiful woman and looks the regal ballerina.  It was a pleasure seeing 32 single fouettes, which I think are more rigorous  than the multiple fouettes where you releve less times and can go at your own speed.    I loved Anastasia Soboleva as Gulnare, who only dances in Act III.  She was  charming, mischievous, delightful, effortless in her dancing, and musical - a complete delight.

 

Though I am not a Le Corsaire fan, the dancers were totally committed to the fluff and gave it their all.  The audience lapped it up. 

 

Thanks (about what happened after I left)!  I'm usually a stay to the bitter end sort, so was chagrined when I realized something was happening without me.

 

Yes, the audience was very receptive Saturday night, which doubtless energized the dancers.  Everyone was a winner.

 

My audience neighbor was very impressed with MacKay, as I was--very lyrical and smooth.  His lifts need a little work; but I'm sure he's working on that as I type this.

 

The performers last Saturday from the top of the bill to the bottom all get an enthusiastic thumbs up from me, whatever use they can make of that; but I have reservations about the production (as opposed to the dancing).  Quite some long time ago indeed, I saw a production from I believe it was the Bolshoi; and though I don't associate Farukh Ruzimatov with the B., I'm certain he was the Ali, and he turned in an unforgettable performance, and the production was splendid and opulent, from the shipwreck at the beginning to the sailing off to new adventures at the end.  --My point being that I'd happily empty my wallet to see another such production of Le Corsaire; another iteration of this cropped and re-arranged production, eh, not so much . . .

Share this post


Link to post
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...