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Promotions at NYCB!!!


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I just saw a posting on the NYTimes website announcing that Tyler Angle, Robert Fairchild, Tiler Peck, Amar Ramasar and Tess Reichlin have all been promoted to principal. Kathryn Morgan has been promoted to soloist. Great news, and the promotions are well deserved.

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Congratulations to all of the dancers!

All of the promotions are well-deserved, IMO, but that is a lot of principals. Wow.

You are right Cinnamonswirl. The one caveat is that Darci Kistler will be retiring in the spring (announced) -- perhaps a few other

principals will follow her lead (or not).

It's wonderful that such a talented group of young dancers received the promotion they deserved!

Bravo to all!

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I just saw a posting on the NYTimes website announcing that Tyler Angle, Robert Fairchild, Tiler Peck, Amar Ramasar and Tess Reichlin have all been promoted to principal. Kathryn Morgan has been promoted to soloist. Great news, and the promotions are well deserved.

Reichlen in particular seems overdue for this promotion, but yay, nice news all around. I've been fans of some of these dancers since they started in the corps. (I guess i should feel old, then.)

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I just saw a posting on the NYTimes website announcing that Tyler Angle, Robert Fairchild, Tiler Peck, Amar Ramasar and Tess Reichlin have all been promoted to principal. Kathryn Morgan has been promoted to soloist. Great news, and the promotions are well deserved.

Reichlen in particular seems overdue for this promotion, but yay, nice news all around. I've been fans of some of these dancers since they started in the corps. (I guess i should feel old, then.)

I was a fan of Darci Kistler's when she was in the corps; I think this means I'm older than dirt ... :wink:

Congrats to all the newly promoted dancers - well done! I've seen memorable performances by all of them, and I'm looking forward to enjoying many more as I drift away into my dotage.

Re Kistler - I'm sad to see her leave, even though I know it's time.

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Does anyone think that all of these promotions (and the added expense) might hasten the departure of certain older principal dancers (aside from Kistler, who already announced her impending departure)?

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Here's the official release:

New York City Ballet announced today that five dancers, Tyler Angle, Robert Fairchild, Tiler Peck, Amar Ramasar, and Teresa Reichlen have been promoted to the rank of Principal Dancer, and that corps de ballet member Kathryn Morgan has been promoted to Soloist.

Peter Martins, NYCB’s Ballet Master in Chief, made the promotions as the Company prepares for its annual Opening Night Benefit, which takes place on Tuesday, November 24, at the David H. Koch Theater at Lincoln Center. All of the newly appointed Principal Dancers are scheduled to make their debut performance as Principals in Martins’ new ballet, set to John Adams’ Naïve and Sentimental Music, which will receive its World Premiere at the November 24 gala performance.

Following the Opening Night Benefit, NYCB will perform its annual holiday engagement of George Balanchine’s The Nutcracker™, November 27 through January 3, followed by its 2010 Winter Repertory Season, January 5 through February 28.

New Principal Dancers

Tyler Angle was born in Altoona, Pennsylvania, and began his dance training at the age of nine at the Allegheny Ballet Company. He entered the School of American Ballet (SAB), the official school of New York City Ballet, full time in the fall of 2001.

Angle became an apprentice with NYCB in the fall of 2003. As an apprentice, he danced a featured role in Michel Fokine’s Chopiniana, performed by SAB as part of the NYCB 2004 Winter season. Angle joined New York City Ballet as a member of the corps de ballet in June 2004 and was promoted to Soloist in December 2007.

Since joining NYCB, Angle has performed featured roles in George Balanchine’s Agon, The Four Temperaments, Coppélia, Divertimento No. 15, George Balanchine’s The Nutcracker (Cavalier and Hot Chocolate), Liebeslieder Walzer, A Midsummer Night’s Dream (Divertissement), Symphony in C (Fourth Movement), La Valse, and Vienna Waltzes; Jerome Robbins’ 2 & 3 Part Inventions, Dances at a Gathering, Fancy Free, The Four Seasons, The Goldberg Variations, I’m Old Fashioned, In G Major, and In the Night; Peter Martins’ A Fool For You, Les Gentilhommes, Papillons, Romeo + Juliet (Tybalt), The Sleeping Beauty, Stabat Mater, Swan Lake (Spanish and Hungarian), and Thou Swell; Sean Lavery’s Romeo and Juliet; Christopher Wheeldon’s Evenfall and Mercurial Manoeuvres; Alexei Ratmansky’s Concerto DSCH; Angelin Preljocaj’s La Stravaganza; and Eliot Feld’s The Unanswered Question.

He has originated roles in Peter Martins’ The Red Violin and Friandises; Christopher Wheeldon’s An American in Paris, Klavier, and The Nightingale and the Rose (The Student); Melissa Barak’s A Simple Symphony; Mauro Bigonzetti’s Oltremare; Jean-Pierre Bonnefoux’s Two Birds with the Wings of One; and Benjamin Millepied’s Quasi Una Fantasia. He also originated featured roles in the NYCB Premieres of Eliot Feld’s Intermezzo No. 1 and Christopher d’Amboise’s Tribute. Angle received the Mae L. Wein Award in 2002, the Martin Segal Award in 2003, and a Jerome Robbins Scholarship to study at SAB.

Tiler Peck was born in Bakersfield, California. She began her dance training at the age of seven, and at the age of 11, she began studying with former NYCB dancers Colleen and Patricia Neary. During this time she also studied with former NYCB Principal Dancer Yvonne Mounsey at Westside School of Ballet. At the age of 12, Peck entered SAB for most of the 2000-2001 Winter Term. She returned during the summers of 2002 and 2003, and that fall began as a full-time student. In September 2004, Peck became an apprentice with NYCB. In February 2005, she joined the Company as a member of the corps de ballet and was promoted to Soloist in December 2006.

Since joining NYCB, Peck has performed featured roles in George Balanchine’s Allegro Brillante, Brahms-Schoenberg Quartet, Coppélia (Swanilda), Divertimento No. 15, Donizetti Variations, Emeralds from Jewels, A Midsummer Night’s Dream (Butterfly), George Balanchine’s The Nutcracker (Dewdrop, Marzipan, Dolls, and Sugarplum Fairy), Raymonda Variations, Symphony in C (Fourth Movement), Symphony in Three Movements, Tarantella, Theme and Variations, Tschaikovsky Suite No. 3, and Valse-Fantaisie; Jerome Robbins’ 2 & 3 Part Inventions, Fancy Free, Four Bagatelles, The Four Seasons, Interplay, Les Noces, and Other Dances; Peter Martins’ A Fool For You, Romeo + Juliet (Juliet), The Sleeping Beauty (Princess Florine and Emerald), and Swan Lake (“Pas de Quartre”); Susan Stroman’s Double Feature (Anne Windsor); and Christopher Wheeldon’s An American in Paris, Carousel (A Dance), and Mercurial Manoeuvres.

Peck has originated featured roles in Peter Martins’ Friandises and The Red Violin; Melissa Barak’s A Simple Symphony; Mauro Bigonzetti’s In Vento and Oltremare; and Benjamin Millepied’s Quasi Una Fantasia.

In addition, Peck has performed featured roles in the NYCB premieres of Christopher d’Amboise’s Tribute and Jerome Robbins’ N.Y. Export: Opus Jazz. Peck was a 2004 recipient of the Princess Grace Foundation - USA Dance Fellowship, a 2004 Mae L. Wien Award recipient, and the Janice Levin Dancer Honoree for 2006-2007. In addition, Peck performed in Meredith Willson’s The Music Man on Broadway and as Clara in the Radio City Christmas Spectacular. At the opening ceremony for the 1998 Goodwill Games, Peck danced a featured role in choreography by Marguerite Derricks. Peck’s film credits include appearances in A Time for Dancing (2000), Geppetto (2000) and Donnie Darko (2001).

Amar Ramasar was born in the Bronx, New York, and began his studies at SAB in 1993. In addition, he studied at the American Ballet Theatre Summer Program and The Rock School of

Pennsylvania Ballet. In July 2000, Ramasar was invited to become an apprentice with New York City Ballet, and in July 2001 he joined the Company as a member of the corps de ballet. He was promoted to the rank of Soloist in March of 2006.

Since joining NYCB, Ramasar has danced featured roles in George Balanchine’s Agon, Allegro Brillante, Brahms-Schoenberg Quartet (Fourth Movement), Divertimento No. 15, Episodes, The Four Temperaments, A Midsummer Night’s Dream, George Balanchine’s The Nutcracker (Cavalier, Hot Chocolate, Mouse King, Mother Ginger), Orpheus, Stravinsky Violin Concerto, Symphony in Three Movements, La Sonnambula, Tschaikovsky Piano Concerto No. 2, and La Valse; Jerome Robbins’ 2 & 3 Part Inventions, Concertino, Dances at a Gathering, Fancy Free, Fanfare, The Four Seasons, The Goldberg Variations, In the Night, Interplay, Piano Pieces, and West Side Story Suite (Bernardo); Peter Martins’ A Fool For You, Concerto for Two Solo Pianos, Fearful Symmetries, Les Gentilhommes, Guide to Strange Places, The Infernal Machine, Jeu de Cartes, River of Light, Romeo + Juliet (Tybalt), The Sleeping Beauty, Songs of the Auvergne, and Swan Lake; Christopher Wheeldon’s After the Rain and Polyphonia; David Allan’s Reunions; Angelin Preljocaj’s La Stravaganza; and Susan Stroman’s Double Feature.

He has also originated featured roles in Mr. Martins’ Chichester Psalms, The Red Violin and Friandises; Mauro Bigonzetti’s Oltremare; Jorma Elo’s Slice to Sharp; Douglas Lee’s Lifecasting; Benjamin Millepied’s Quasi Una Fantasia; and Alexei Ratmansky’s Russian Seasons. Ramasar has originated corps roles in Melissa Barak’s Telemann Overture Suite in E Minor; Boris Eifman’s Musagète; the NYCB premieres of Mr. Martins’ Hallelujah Junction and Robbins’ N.Y. Export: Opus Jazz; Susan Stroman’s Double Feature; and Christopher Wheeldon’s An American in Paris, Carnival of the Animals, and Shambards. In addition, Ramasar was a 2000 Mae L. Wien Award recipient.

Teresa Reichlen was born in Clifton, Virginia and began her dance training at the age of 10 at the Russell School of Ballet with Thomas and Illona Russell, Mary Rogers, and Margaret McGarry. In 1999, Reichlen studied at the SAB summer program and entered full time in the fall of that same year. In October 2000, Reichlen became an apprentice with New York City Ballet, and

the following year she joined the Company as a member of the corps de ballet. In January 2005,

Reichlen was promoted to the rank of Soloist.

Since joining NYCB, Reichlen has performed featured roles in George Balanchine’s Agon, Apollo, Brahms-Schoenberg Quartet, Concerto Barocco, Coppélia, Episodes, Firebird, The Four Temperaments, George Balanchine’s The Nutcracker (Sugarplum Fairy, Dewdrop, Coffee, and Flowers), Harlequinade, Jewels (Rubies and Emeralds), A Midsummer Night’s Dream (Titania and Hippolyta), Monumentun Pro Gesualdo, Orpheus, Prodigal Son, Raymonda Variations, Serenade, Stars and Stripes, Tschaikovsky Piano Concerto No. 2, Union Jack, Western Symphony, and Who Cares?; Jerome Robbins’ Antique Epigraphs, The Cage, Fanfare (Harp), Moves, and The Goldberg Variations; Peter Martins’ The Chairman Dances, River of Light, The Sleeping Beauty, and Swan Lake; Christopher Wheeldon’s After The Rain; Mauro Bigonzetti’s In Vento; and Jorma Elo’s Slice to Sharp.

Reichlen has originated roles in Mauro Bigonzetti’s In Vento, Boris Eifman’s Musagète, Robert La Fosse’s Land of Nod, Mr. Martins’ Chichester Psalms, Susan Stroman’s Double Feature, and Christopher Wheeldon’s Carnival of the Animals. Reichlen was the Janice Levin Dancer Honoree for 2004-2005.

New Soloist

Kathryn Morgan is from Mobile, Alabama, and began studying ballet at the Mobile Ballet School. She attended summer sessions at SAB in 2002 and 2004, before enrolling as a full-time student in fall 2004. Morgan performed several principal roles in the SAB annual Workshop Performances in both 2005 (Western Symphony and 28 Variations on a Theme by Paganini) and 2006 (Scènes de Ballet and Bourrée Fantasque), and performed the principal female role in Scènes de Ballet during NYCB’s 2006 Winter and Spring seasons. Morgan became an apprentice with NYCB in July 2006 during the Company’s annual season at the Saratoga Performing Arts Center. During that season, she danced the role of Juliet in Sean Lavery’s Romeo and Juliet. At the Company’s Opening Night performance in November 2006, Morgan danced the lead role in Christopher Wheeldon’s Carousel (A Dance). In February 2007, Morgan became a member of the corps de ballet.

Since joining NYCB, Morgan has performed feature roles in George Balanchine’s Ballo della Regina, Coppélia, George Balanchine’s The Nutcracker™ (Dewdrop, Sugarplum Fairy, and Marzipan), Scotch Symphony, Stars and Stripes, La Valse, and Western Symphony; Jerome Robbins’ Dances at a Gathering, The Four Seasons, and Les Noces; Peter Martins’ Romeo + Juliet (Juliet), The Sleeping Beauty (pas de deux), and Stabat Mater; Christopher Wheeldon’s Mercurial Manoeuvres; and August Bournonville’s Flower Festival in Genzano Pas de Deux.

She also originated a corps role in Benjamin Millepied’s Quasi Una Fantasia. Morgan received SAB’s Mae L. Wien Award for Outstanding Promise and was named a Movado Future Legend in 2006, the first year of this initiative.

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Does anyone think that all of these promotions (and the added expense) might hasten the departure of certain older principal dancers (aside from Kistler, who already announced her impending departure)?

I doubt promotions would move people out on their own but they might indicate that Martins already knows about retirement plans that are not public.

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I doubt promotions would move people out on their own but they might indicate that Martins already knows about retirement plans that are not public.

Yes, that was what I was thinking.

They're also a couple of principals who (Ringer, Somogyi), for various reasons, haven't been dancing much, so maybe Martins is looking to fill that void.

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I was bored at the office today and started wondering just how many principals there are now at NYCB. According to their website, the current count is 29 principals, 14 soloists and 49 corp dancers. I know others have commented that the company may be top heavy, but seeing those numbers shows just how true that observation really is. Very interesting.

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I was bored at the office today and started wondering just how many principals there are now at NYCB. According to their website, the current count is 29 principals, 14 soloists and 49 corp dancers. I know others have commented that the company may be top heavy, but seeing those numbers shows just how true that observation really is. Very interesting.
Thanks for the research, Krystin.

Your count means that almost one-third of dancers (31.5%) are principals Nearly half 46.7%) have been promoted beyond the corps.

I appreciate that there are many factors to explain and even justify what some might see as over-promotion. But, as in those proverbial banana republics which seemed to have more generals than foot soldiers, it does seem a little ... excessive, and a fascinating topic for a sociologist. :thumbsup:

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I appreciate that there are many factors to explain and even justify what some might see as over-promotion. But, as in those proverbial banana republics which seemed to have more generals than foot soldiers, it does seem a little ... excessive, and a fascinating topic for a sociologist. :thumbsup:

And remember, some corps were let go a little earlier to "save money"

This part reminds me a bit of the corporate world. Lay off the worker bees and promote the managers. Same idea as your example...lots of chiefs and not so many indians.

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The top heavy nature of the NYCB current roster leads me to guess that certain principals may retire in the not too distant future, whether voluntarily or otherwise.
This explains some of the new promotions, I'm sure. I was wondering, though, whether there isn't something else at play.

Is the concept of "Principal" undergoing redefinition? It seems that at one time becoming a Principal was a kind of reward for past achievement. Now, it sometimes seems to be a a way of encouraging promising but unevenly formed young performers to stick around.

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Is the concept of "Principal" undergoing redefinition? It seems that at one time becoming a Principal was a kind of reward for past achievement. Now, it sometimes seems to be a a way of encouraging promising but unevenly formed young performers to stick around.

Interesting point. In my opinion, 4 of the 5 promotions to principal are absolutely based on stellar past achievements. These individuals have been doing principal level work, and have been carrying a substantial workload, for quite some time. They are finally receiving the recognition and compensation they deserve, in my opinion. Given the dire financial issues that have been swirling around NYCB in recent months regarding the firing of various corps members, some of these individuals may have been wondering how much longer they would have to wait for a promotion due to financial considerations.

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Thanks for that, cinammonswirl. Tess Reichlen seems like a lovely person. She had me at 'The Berenstain Bears and the Spooky Old Tree' (from the Oct 19 post). However, the NYCB season hasn't even started yet and she sounds exhausted already. :wink:

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Is the concept of "Principal" undergoing redefinition? It seems that at one time becoming a Principal was a kind of reward for past achievement. Now, it sometimes seems to be a a way of encouraging promising but unevenly formed young performers to stick around.

I blame it on the Nobel Committee. :wink:

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From NYCB -

ERICA PEREIRA PROMOTED TO SOLOIST AT NEW YORK CITY BALLET

New York City Ballet announced today that Erica Pereira has been promoted to Soloist. Peter Martins, NYCB’s Ballet Master in Chief, made the promotion during the Company’s annual season of the holiday classic George Balanchine’s The Nutcracker™.

Erica Pereira was born in Northport, New York, and began studying ballet at the age of 8. In 2005 Pereira began studying at the School of American Ballet, the official school of New York City Ballet. In addition, she attended summer programs at Central Pennsylvania Youth Ballet, American Ballet Theatre, and Pacific Northwest Ballet. Pereira became an apprentice with NYCB in December 2006. While an apprentice, she danced the role of Juliet in Peter Martins’ Romeo + Juliet as part of the 2007 spring season. She joined the Company as a member of the corps de ballet in May 2007.

Since joining NYCB, Pereira has danced features roles in George Balanchine’s Ballo della Regina, Chaconne, Divertimento No. 15, George Balanchine’s The Nutcracker™ (Dewdrop, Dolls, Marzipan, and Sugarplum Fairy), A Midsummer Night’s Dream (Butterfly), Scotch Symphony, Stars and Stripes, The Steadfast Tin Soldier, and Tarantella; Jerome Robbins’ The Four Seasons (Winter); Peter Martins’ River of Light and Romeo + Juliet; and Christopher Wheeldon’s Mercurial Manoeuvres.

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