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British/Scottish music in Union Jack/Figure in the Carpet


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If anybody can help me with the following question, I would be so grateful. I've been stuck on this piece of music since I saw the PBS American Masters' documentary on Balanchine. The late ballerina, Diana Adams (dressed in Scottish uniform with a regiment), dances to this music in "The Figure in the Carpet" (1961/2) in the documentary. It is a British or Scottish sounding piece. Balanchine liked it so much that he put it in "Union Jack" (1976) many years later - I think... Does anyone know what I am talking about? Then, a few weeks ago, I heard the same piece of music in the film, "The Duchess."

Thanks for any information.

Neryssa

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well the balanchine foundation website says this:

In 1976, Balanchine used the Scottish theme from the Water Music for the Royal Canadian Air Force variation in Union Jack.

Handel's water music...? I wish somebody who has the American Masters DVD could confirm this. Thanks, Mme. Hermine.

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It also says this:

Music: By George Frederick Handel (from the Royal Fireworks Music, 1749, and Water Music, ca. 1717). Book by George Lewis; underlying ideas in the organization of the sequence of scenes suggested by Dr. Arthur Upham Pope.

Choreography: By George Balanchine.

Production: Scenery, costumes, and lighting by Esteban Francés. Scenery executed by Nolan Brothers; costumes executed by Karinska.

Premiere: April 13, 1960, New York City Ballet, City Center of Music and Drama, New York. Conductor: Robert Irving.

Devised in the style of an eighteenth-century court ballet, based on Dr. Pope's relation of Handel's musical counterpoint to Persian carpet weaving of the period. The title is from a tale by Henry James.

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It also says this:

Music: By George Frederick Handel (from the Royal Fireworks Music, 1749, and Water Music, ca. 1717). Book by George Lewis; underlying ideas in the organization of the sequence of scenes suggested by Dr. Arthur Upham Pope.

Choreography: By George Balanchine.

Production: Scenery, costumes, and lighting by Esteban Francés. Scenery executed by Nolan Brothers; costumes executed by Karinska.

Premiere: April 13, 1960, New York City Ballet, City Center of Music and Drama, New York. Conductor: Robert Irving.

Devised in the style of an eighteenth-century court ballet, based on Dr. Pope's relation of Handel's musical counterpoint to Persian carpet weaving of the period. The title is from a tale by Henry James.

Why couldn't I do this?! I love you Mme. Hermine! :thumbsup: I just checked iTunes and I finally found the 1:27 minute piece from Water Music Suite: Gigue

Thank you very much ~ Neryssa

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