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Crying at the ballet

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and then in the late 2nd part pdd which I don't know how to describe, but Patty McB and Bart Cook performed,

Yes! Exactly that! And Cook was simply inspired, bristling with fire there--I've never forgotten how glorious he also was in that performance, so thanks for mentioning it.

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The end of "Dances at a Gathering" does it for me. And the Act I curtain for Giselle. And yes, the right Act II curtain, too - major blub. And I can cry at proper apotheoses in Sleeping Beauty and Swan Lake, too.

I am with you Mel. The first act of Giselle if done right can really get me. If the storytelling is done well the situation for all involved is so tragic.

Also when Alexandra Ferri sits on the end of the bed in Romeo and Juliet. The music swells and she is motionless with Juliets thoughts and emotions carrying the moment. It is all internal and is so powerful at that moment.

Just sometimes the feeling of being in the Theater (somewhere legandary like the Royal Opera House, The Met, or the City Center, the buzz of the crowd and the feeling of being there with so many ballet lovers really gives me the shivers and makes me well up thinking how lucky I am to be alive and right there at that moment. The anticipation of the moment.

I knew my son at 11 was hooked when I took him to a peformance of ABT and turned at some pointe to see him with tears rolling down his cheeks. When I asked if he was OK he answered "its so good". I knew at that point he was hooked! :sweatingbullets:

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I cry whenever I saw Chris Wheeldon's After the Rain with Jock Soto and Wendy Whelan. Jock is hard to replace, in my opinion. That role was made for him. The first time I saw Gentilhommes 3 or 4 years ago brought me to tears. It was beautiful to see all the male SAB students dancing like men at the workshop

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I never blub(ber), just get that little lump in back of throat, and have to blink...

1) The oboe(?)'s first notes of Swan Lake's Overture. All the emotions poured into those first 8-10 notes. And the Act IV finale when the key changes to major(?) as the sun comes up, our lovers are united in some nice afterlife (in the traditional versions anyways) , and the swans can be women again.

2) The Nutcracker Pdd. (not the variations or coda) Again, music in a "minor" key after all the fluff before and after. (And snowflakes too--though I'm usually smiling too in remembrance).

3) The final C-major chord of Prokofiev's Romeo & Juliet. (Best final chord of any ballet; Firebird is runner-up.)

4) The opening of Round of Angels and then the dance itself.

5) Arvo Part's "Fratres" (sorry it's so overused now); Wheeldon's "Liturgy" .

6) And my anonymous entry...Last November watching a certain dancer perform a certain work (to music by one of my favorite composers) specifically choreographed on them. In a weekend that could have been all tears, it was the one thing that made me smile--and to this day, sustains me.

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I'm usually not tearful at the ballet, but this past weekend in Seattle has been a very emotional one. Patricia Barker's farewell program was planned months in advance and was highly publicized after she announced her impending retirement last year, but according to Peter Boal, Christophe Maraval announced his in April. Boal created a short ballet for him and his long-time partner, Louise Nadeau, but his final role in the regular season was to be in the central pas de deux of Symphony in Three Movements, with Miranda Weese. Sadly, Weese had a calf injury (per Boal), and rather than start over with a new partner, Maraval chose to end the season in Boal's ballet.

It was already a highly charged night, as Jonathan Porretta danced an even more intense State of Darkness. After the last intermissions, Maraval and Nadeau danced Boal's Adieu, which was a lovely portrait of both dancers and a fitting tribute to them. Maraval was moved by the ovation, and when the curtain came down, there was a giant cheer from backstage.

The next night, Barker bid her goodbye in a program she selected, and Maraval was her partner in the second work, the first Pas de Deux from A Midsummer Night's Dream. It was so fitting to see Maraval in a Conrad Ludlow role, as a partner of the highest caliber, putting the irreplaceable Barker in the spotlight.

That was a cause for tears.

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What a lovely envoi. That first pas de deux is one of the most gloriously theatrical of all the pas de deux Balanchine created, even without the transforming scenery and the light changes. A truly queenly farewell.

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It was already a highly charged night, as Jonathan Porretta danced an even more intense State of Darkness. After the last intermissions, Maraval and Nadeau danced Boal's Adieu, which was a lovely portrait of both dancers and a fitting tribute to them. Maraval was moved by the ovation, and when the curtain came down, there was a giant cheer from backstage.

The next night, Barker bid her goodbye in a program she selected, and Maraval was her partner in the second work, the first Pas de Deux from A Midsummer Night's Dream. It was so fitting to see Maraval in a Conrad Ludlow role, as a partner of the highest caliber, putting the irreplaceable Barker in the spotlight.

That was a cause for tears.

I'm so glad you saw the special duet for Maraval and Nadeau -- I had to be elsewhere, and was so sorry to miss the evening.

I didn't get teary at the Barker farewell, I think because we've had the whole year to get used to the idea that she's leaving, but I did thoroughly enjoy both Balanchines. Midsummer was lush and wild, and Agon (with Olivier Wevers, who is dancing particularly well lately) just blew me away.

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I always get very emotional at the end of Giselle Act I. This love/deception/madness formula simply gets me very deep.

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I can usually be found sobbing my eyes out by the end of Kenneth MacMillan's Manon - when Manon and des Grieux are dancing and she just goes limp in his arms :clapping:

I've twice seen Sylvie Guillem as Manon, and she's absolutley fantastic.

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Are the tears always related to the emotions of the storyline... or can anyone actually cry because of the beauty of the dance? I would think of so they would be tears of joy rather than sorrow.

I haven't shed a tear but I have thrilled very deeply when seeing beautiful dance... and it need not be virtuosity. It almost takes my breath away. I like the feeling... and wonder if dancers and choreographers are aware of how this can effect some people.

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I always get very emotional at the end of Giselle Act I. This love/deception/madness formula simply gets me very deep.

I am definitely with you there. I have cried onstage at the end of act one as a peasant after watching Franklin Gamero and Iliana Lopez in Giselle. Have you ever seen them?

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I always get very emotional at the end of Giselle Act I. This love/deception/madness formula simply gets me very deep.

I am definitely with you there. I have cried onstage at the end of act one as a peasant after watching Franklin Gamero and Iliana Lopez in Giselle. Have you ever seen them?

No, i haven't... :) , but i saw many "Giselles" by Mme. Alicia Alonso :helpsmilie: and she just had the exact formula of how to tear my heart apart EVERY SINGLE TIME...

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Figurante, I'd love to hear your memories of the Lopez/Gomero partnership and just what made them so moving to you.

I started attending Miami in 2002 and did see that Giselle, but I blush to say that I have no special impression of their dancing. The only other thing I saw was Diamonds Pdd in their last season (2004).

I know that many Miami fans have warm and deep memories of the partnership.

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. . . the Lopez/Gomero partnership and just what made them so moving . . .

I find it poignant when art imitates life inasmuch as ballet partnerships are formed of real life partners: McBride-Bonnefous, Lopez-Gomero, Cojocaru-Kobborg . . . my most moving memories of this sort are of Jenifer Ringer and James Fayette in the second movement of Brahms-Schoenberg.

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I started attending Miami in 2002 and did see that Giselle, but I blush to say that I have no special impression of their dancing. I know that many Miami fans have warm and deep memories of the partnership.

I remember when MCB did Giselle...I just had came from Cuba, and didn't get to see it...Aside from the fact that back then i didn't even have money to take a bus- (so talk about attending a ballet performance)- i was still hesitating (even kind of in denial,i must say) on the very real fact that THAT OTHER GISELLE that had made me cry so many times was already , and was going to remain ,FOREVER in the past ...

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I am a fairly sentimental person, both music and ballet often touch me deeply, so much so, I always make sure I have a tissue handy. This is fine in my own home, sitting in a room with dimmed lights watching one of my many DVD'S, Manon, Myerling (Mc Millan) Sylvia (eumer.) Swan Lake Finale, Bayadere, Raymonda all bring tears to my eye's.

However, the worst occasion was in October 2007, when I had gone to the Opera Bastille, in Paris, to see the new Berlioz version by Sasha Waltz of Romeo and Juliertte. This production was unique, quite different to a normal classical ballet performance. It consisted of Orchestral music, an Opera chorus and Soloists, and the Etoiles and Corp de ballet of the POB. There was no inerval to pull yourself together or get a freshment, it just run ,for 1hr 45mins.

It was absolutely wonderful very tragic, moving, and unforgetable. By the time the finale came, when the two young lovers lay dead in each

others arms on the stage I had a big lump in my throat and tears in my eyes. As the house lights went up, I was not the only person with wet checks, where my tears uncontrolled had rum down my face. It took me all my composure to dry my eyes and leave my seat, as though nothing had happened !!! :):dunno::o

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OH, I am very emotional at ballets! The beauty and grace in them just breaks my heart. I cried like a baby at the NYCB's Romeo and Juliet with Sterling Hyltin not only because I know her, but because it was so well done and wonderful to watch. I also cried during La Somanbula with Darci Kistler. Her spirit-like bourees that seemed to make her float across the stage are what set off the floods!!!

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I cried like a baby at the NYCB's Romeo and Juliet with Sterling Hyltin not only because I know her, but because it was so well done and wonderful to watch.

I identify with the statement: "because it was so well done and wonderful to watch." Sometimes there is an out-of-this-world quality to a peformance -- something that is based on exceptional technique but transcends it --that makes me feel emotional and full of gratitude that arts like ballet, opera, and classical theater exist.

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I cried like a baby at the NYCB's Romeo and Juliet with Sterling Hyltin not only because I know her, but because it was so well done and wonderful to watch.

I identify with the statement: "because it was so well done and wonderful to watch." Sometimes there is an out-of-this-world quality to a peformance -- something that is based on exceptional technique but transcends it --that makes me feel emotional and full of gratitude that arts like ballet, opera, and classical theater exist.

I'm not a cryer, but deep admiration and gratitude are feelings I'm very familiar with at the ballet. In part it's generally because I'm happy for the dancers, almost as a friend or relative might be at a great achievement. The dancers at the time are beautiful to me not just as performers, but -- in the magnificence of their achievement -- as people.

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Reviewing NYCB's "Four Voices" program, Alistair Macaulay says he cried at two of the ballets: Wheeldon's "Carousel (A Dance)" and Mr. B's "Sonnambula." I always cry at the latter. (One look at Paul Kolnik's stunning photo of Kistler and Hubbe in today's NY Times and I almost teared up again). Macaulay considers these lachrymose reactions "cause for celebration," and I agree with him. I always used to cry at Balanchine's "Don Quixote," and did again at every performance of Farrell's revival two years ago. I may have brought up this subject in the past, but I think it's time for another good cry. What always makes you weep at the ballet? No wise guy answers, please.

I started crying at Maya Plisetskaya's Carmen even before she made a single step. Just the impact of seeing her in the middle of the stage after the curtain went up was such,that you couldn' help getting very emotional.Also cried at Baryshnikov's and late Natalia Bessmertnova's Giselle at the Kirov - the best performance of Giselle either on stage or video - unforgettable.

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Sometimes, I can weep for joy at even the sunniest moments in ballet. I've been known to dissolve in a welter of tears at the double curtain in "Les Patineurs", or during any given moment in Gerald Arpino's (I know, I know) "Trinity" or "Kettentanz". A beautifully executed "Agon" can do it, too. I'm like the late Walter Kerr: When the happiness level reaches a certain point, I cry!

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All my friends know that tears leap from my eyes at the drop of a hat both from seeing a tragedy such as R&J and from something that is happy (Two pigeons) and/or beautiful (rose adagio). Some performances have me sobbing uncontrollably (which can be very embarrassing!):

Robert Parker and Nao Sakuma in Two Pigeons

Carolin Cavallo and Andrew Bowman (RDB) in Manon (March 2006, Copenhagen)

Desire Samaii and Daniel de Andrade in Madame Butterfly

Eva Evdokimova and Alexander Sombart in Onegin

Agnes Le Testu and Jiri Bubenicek in Lady of the Camelias

In the final of the listed performances I started sobbing towards the beginning of the last act (I had never realised that someone just standing at the side of the stage could have such an effect) and continued right through to the end, plus all the curtain calls and standing ovation and all the way back to our hotel. My friend was similarly affected and we couldn't speak for about an hour afterwards. We had seen the previous evening's performance and, while I very much enjoyed it, it did not have the same emotional impact so this was definitely down to the leading dancers. The performance occurred in Paris in July 2006.

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Okay, this is going to sound completely lame. Yes, I do cry at the end of Romeo and Juliet, Manon, normal dark ballets. I also cry from beauty. My lameness-I always cry when the orchestra begins the opening overture. I have no clue why-I am moved by music normally but perhaps the music coupled with the anticipation of what I'm about to see just gets me. My husband always laughs at me while giving me tissues.

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