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From the today's New York Times Romeo + Juliet review by Alastair Macaulay:

"News has just arrived that, effective today, Mr. (Robert) Fairchild and Mr. (Seth) Orza have been promoted to soloist rank from the corps de ballet, while Sterling Hyltin, Mr. Fairchild’s opening-night Juliet, is among those newly promoted to principal from soloist."

The complete list of promotions will be post soon.

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The official announcement:

NEW YORK CITY BALLET

ANNOUNCES EIGHT PROMOTIONS

Sterling Hyltin, Jonathan Stafford, Daniel Ulbricht, and Andrew Veyette

Promoted to Principal Dancer

Robert Fairchild, Craig Hall, Seth Orza, and Sean Suozzi Promoted to Soloist

New York City Ballet has announced eight promotions, effective immediately. Sterling Hyltin, Jonathan Stafford, Daniel Ulbricht, and Andrew Veyette have all been promoted to the rank of principal dancer, and Robert Fairchild, Craig Hall, Seth Orza, and Sean Suozzi have all been promoted to soloist.

Peter Martins, NYCB’s Ballet Master in Chief, announced these promotions during the Company’s two-week presentation of Romeo + Juliet, the highlight of the 2007 spring season. All eight dancers are performing featured roles in Romeo + Juliet, which runs through Sunday, May 13.

New Principal Dancers

Sterling Hyltin was born in Amarillo, Texas. She began her dance training at the age of six at the Dallas Metropolitan Ballet, and she entered the School of American Ballet in the fall of 2000. In June 2003, Ms. Hyltin joined New York City Ballet as a member of the corps de ballet, and she was promoted to soloist in March 2006. Ms. Hyltin originated the role of Juliet in Peter Martins’ Romeo + Juliet. She has danced featured roles in George Balanchine’s Ballo della Regina, Divertimento No. 15, George Balanchine’s The Nutcracker (Sugarplum Fairy, Dewdrop, Marzipan, and Dolls), Harlequinade (Lead Alouette), A Midsummer Night’s Dream (Butterfly and Hermia), Stars and Stripes, Symphony in C (Third Movement), Symphony in Three Movements, Tarantella, Vienna Waltzes, and Western Symphony (Adagio); Jerome Robbins’ 2 & 3 Part Inventions and Fanfare (Flutes); and Mr. Martins’ Jeu de Cartes, Morgen, The Sleeping Beauty (Princess Aurora, Princess Florine, Eloquence, and White Cat), Songs of the Auvergne, and Swan Lake (Pas de Trois). She originated a featured role in Mr. Martins The Red Violin. Ms. Hyltin was NYCB’s Janice Levin Dancer Honoree for 2005-2006.

Jonathan Stafford was born in Carlisle, Pennsylvania, and began his dance training at the age of eight with the Central Pennsylvania Youth Ballet. Mr. Stafford entered the School of American Ballet in the fall of 1997. He joined New York City Ballet’s corps de ballet in February 1999 and was promoted to soloist in March 2006. Mr. Stafford originated the role of Paris in Peter Martins’ Romeo + Juliet. He has danced featured roles in George Balanchine’s Firebird, The Four Temperaments, Divertimento No. 15, George Balanchine’s The Nutcracker (Cavalier, Hot Chocolate, Dr. Stahlbaum, and Mother Ginger), Emeralds from Jewels, A Midsummer Night’s Dream (Lysander), Orpheus, Symphony In C (First Movement), and Tschaikovsky Piano Concerto No. 2; Jerome Robbins’ 2 & 3 Part Inventions, Fancy Free, Fanfare (Double Bass), and Interplay; Mr. Martins’ Octet, The Sleeping Beauty (Prince Désiré and Gold), Songs of the Auvergne, and Swan Lake (Pas de Quatre and Spanish); and Christopher Wheeldon’s Klavier and Polyphonia. Mr. Stafford’s sister, Abi Stafford, is a soloist with NYCB.

Daniel Ulbricht was born in St. Petersburg, Florida, and began his dance training at the age of 11 at the Judith Lee Johnson Studio of Dance. He also studied at Les Jeunes Danseurs and attended the Chautauqua Summer Dance Program, training with Jean-Pierre Bonnefoux and Patricia McBride. In 1999, Mr. Ulbricht entered the School of American Ballet; while still a student, he performed with New York City Ballet as a Jester in Peter Martins’ The Sleeping Beauty. He joined NYCB’s corps de ballet in November 2001 and was promoted to soloist in January 2005. Mr. Ulbricht originated the role of Mercutio in Mr. Martins’ Romeo + Juliet, and he has also danced featured roles in A Midsummer Night’s Dream (Puck), Mozartiana (Gigue), George Balanchine’s The Nutcracker (Soldier, Chinese Tea, and Candy Cane), Stars and Stripes, Tarantella, and Tschaikovsky Suite No. 3; Jerome Robbins’ Fancy Free, Fanfare (Tuba), The Four Seasons (Fall), and Interplay; Mr. Martins’ Eight More, Fearful Symmetries, Harmonielehre, The Sleeping Beauty (Bluebird), and Swan Lake (Jester); and Richard Tanner’s Soirée (Quadriglia). Mr. Ulbricht originated featured roles in Mr. Martins’ Friandises, Christopher Wheeldon’s Shambards, and Robert La Fosse’s Land of Nod. Mr. Ulbricht was the Janice Levin Dancer Honoree for 2003-2004.

Denver-born Andrew Veyette began his dance training at the age of nine in California, studying at Dance Arts in Visalia and Westside Ballet in Santa Monica. Mr. Veyette entered the School of American Ballet in the fall of 1998 under a Janet Levin Scholarship. In spring 2000, he joined New York City Ballet’s corps de ballet, and he was promoted to soloist in March 2006. Mr. Veyette danced the role of Mercutio in Peter Martins’ Romeo + Juliet. He has danced featured roles in George Balanchine’s Agon, Brahms-Schoenberg Quartet (third movement), Divertimento No. 15, Donizetti Variations, The Four Temperaments, George Balanchine’s The Nutcracker (Cavalier and Hot Chocolate), Harlequinade (Harlequin), A Midsummer Night’s Dream (Oberon and Lysander), Slaughter on Tenth Avenue, Stars and Stripes, Tschaikovsky Pas de Deux, and Tschaikovsky Piano Concerto No. 2; Jerome Robbins’ Fancy Free, Fanfare (Clarinets), Interplay, and N.Y. Export: Opus Jazz; Mr. Martins’ Jeu de Cartes, The Sleeping Beauty (Bluebird and Asia), Swan Lake (Benno and Spanish), and Zakouski; Christopher Wheeldon’s Polyphonia; and Eliot Feld’s Backchat. Mr. Veyette originated featured roles in Mr. Martins’ The Red Violin, Jean-Pierre Bonnefoux’s Two Birds with the Wings of One, and Richard Tanner’s Soirée. Mr. Veyette was a recipient of the Mae L. Wien Award in 2000.

New Soloists

Robert Fairchild was born in Salt Lake City and began dance training at the age of ten at the Ballet West Conservatory. He entered the School of American Ballet in the fall of 2003, and in June 2005, he became an apprentice with NYCB; while still an apprentice, he performed a featured role in the NYCB premiere of Eliot Feld’s Intermezzo No. 1. In June 2006, he joined the Company as a member of the corps de ballet. Mr. Fairchild originated the role of Romeo in Peter Martins’ Romeo + Juliet, and he has also danced featured roles in George Balanchine’s The Nutcracker (Mother Ginger) and Peter Martins’ The Sleeping Beauty (Puss in Boots and Wolf). Mr. Fairchild was the 2005 recipient of the Mae L. Wien Award. His sister, Megan Fairchild, is a principal dancer with New York City Ballet.

Craig Hall was born in Maywood, Illinois, and began his dance training at the age of four at Stairway of the Stars. He also studied at the Chicago Academy of the Arts and the Ruth Page Dance Foundation before entering the School of American Ballet in the fall of 1997. While a student at SAB, he originated a featured role in Christopher Wheeldon’s Scènes de Ballet, which premiered during New York City Ballet’s 1999 spring season. In February 2000, Mr. Hall joined NYCB’s corps de ballet. Mr. Hall performed the role of Tybalt in Peter Martins’ Romeo + Juliet. He has danced featured roles in George Balanchine’s The Four Temperaments, George Balanchine’s The Nutcracker (Chinese Tea and Candy Cane), and La Sonnambula; Jerome Robbins’ Afternoon of a Faun, The Cage, and Fanfare (Bassoons); Mr. Martins’ Reliquary, The Sleeping Beauty (Jesters and Africa), and Swan Lake (Spanish); Mr. Wheeldon’s After the Rain; and Angelin Preljocaj’s La Stravaganza. Mr. Hall originated featured roles in Mr. Wheeldon’s Polyphonia, Jorma Elo’s Slice to Sharp, and Robert La Fosse’s Land of Nod, and in the NYCB premieres of Eliot Feld’s Backchat and Robbins’ N.Y. Export: Opus Jazz. Mr. Hall has won several awards, including a scholarship from the National Foundation for the Advancement in Arts, the Nureyev scholarship, and the Mae L. Wien Award.

Seth Orza was born in San Francisco. In 1994, he began studying at the Summer Program of the School of American Ballet as a scholarship student, and he entered SAB as a full time student in the fall of 1997. He joined New York City Ballet’s corps de ballet in June 2000. Mr. Orza danced the role of Romeo in Peter Martins’ Romeo + Juliet. He has also danced featured roles in George Balanchine’s Agon, Coppélia (“War & Discord”), The Four Temperaments, George Balanchine’s The Nutcracker (Cavalier, Hot Chocolate, Mouse King, Dr. Stahlbaum), Emeralds from Jewels, A Midsummer Night’s Dream (Bottom and Lysander), Slaughter on Tenth Avenue, Symphony in C (Third Movement), and Tschaikovsky Piano Concerto No. 2; Jerome Robbins’ 2 & 3 Part Inventions, Fancy Free, Fanfare (Clarinets), In Memory of…, Interplay, and Piano Pieces; Mr. Martins’ Reliquary, The Sleeping Beauty (Gold, Puss in Boots, and America), Songs of the Auvergne, and Swan Lake (Benno); Christopher Wheeldon’s Carousel (A Dance), Evenfall, and Polyphonia; David Allan’s Reunions; and Angelin Preljocaj’s La Stravaganza. He originated featured roles in Albert Evans’ Haiku, Susan Stroman’s Double Feature (Edward Meekin), and Richard Tanner’s Soirée, and the NYCB premiere of Robbins’ N.Y. Export: Opus Jazz.

Sean Suozzi was born in Glen Cove, New York, and began his dance training at the age of seven with Joyce DiLauro. He trained for four years at the Nutmeg Ballet in Torrington, Connecticut, and entered the School of American Ballet in 1997, then joined New York City Ballet as a member of the corps de ballet in February 2000. Mr. Suozzi performed the role of Romeo in Peter Martins’ Romeo + Juliet. He has danced featured roles in George Balanchine’s Agon, The Four Temperaments, George Balanchine’s The Nutcracker (Chinese Tea, Candy Cane, and Soldier), Emeralds from Jewels, A Midsummer Night’s Dream (Puck), Prodigal Son, Slaughter on Tenth Avenue, Symphony in C (Fourth Movement), and Tschaikovsky Piano Concerto No. 2; Jerome Robbins’ Fanfare (Percussion), The Four Seasons (Winter), and Interplay; and Mr. Martins’ The Sleeping Beauty (Puss in Boots) and Swan Lake (Benno and Spanish) Mr. Suozzi originated a featured role in Mr. Martins’ The Red Violin. In March of 2004, Mr. Suozzi performed with Peter Boal & Company at the Joyce Theater, dancing in the world premieres of John Alleyne’s 2nd Prologue and Marco Goecke’s Mopey.

New York City Ballet’s 2007 spring season runs through Sunday, June 24. All performances are at the New York State Theater at Lincoln Center, on Columbus Avenue at 63rd Street. For more information or to purchase tickets, please call 212-870-5570 or visit www.nycballet.com.

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I feel the same way about Sean Suozzi - it's about time. Congratulations, Sean!

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Congratulations to all.

Extra congratulations to Craig Hall. It's about time.

Ditto!!!

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I have no problems with any of the promotions (some of them being long overdue). But there is one glaring omission - what happened to Tyler Angle, who ONLY does principal roles?

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Congratulations to all.

Extra congratulations to Craig Hall. It's about time.

Ditto!!!

Ditto-ditto!!!.

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I think it's a travesty that Sterling Hyltin was promoted over Tess Reichlen, who is a much more mature dancer. Sterling is benefitting from her starring role as Juliet, but is that reason to promote her so soon after joining the company? She has yet to perform a wide range of Balanchine roles. Tess should have been promoted, it's a shame.

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Those Fairchilds certainly move up the ranks fast!

Congrats to all (esp. the long overdue, as many have said, Hall and Suozzi)!

To me, the most glaring omission is Abi Stafford. She has made the greatest strides over the past few years, going from a pure technician to adding presence and joy to her dancing to create more fully realized performances. And, she has been back to performing meaty principal roles for several seasons now. They may have pushed her too fast into the Soloist rank, but now I think they're keeping her back too long as a Soloist. I think her brother still has a long way to go (way too academic in his approach, for me. no presence).

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What's with all the aCs and TMs on the official NYCB ac TM announcement? They make everything look smudged and a pain to read. I know Ballet Talk is not to blame.

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To me, the most glaring omission is Abi Stafford. She has made the greatest strides over the past few years, going from a pure technician to adding presence and joy to her dancing to create more fully realized performances. And, she has been back to performing meaty principal roles for several seasons now. They may have pushed her too fast into the Soloist rank, but now I think they're keeping her back too long as a Soloist. I think her brother still has a long way to go (way too academic in his approach, for me. no presence).

Ah, but not when he dances with somebody! I always find J. Stafford’s performances as a partner exemplary – not just in the sense that he supports his ballerina or shows her off to best advantage – but more importantly, in realizing the theatrical possibilities of two people dancing together, even if they happen to be in the back row of the corps. I admit, an eyebrow shot up when I saw him cast opposite Sylve in Firebird – her monumental presence sometimes overwhelms that of even the most vivid dancers, and I’d be inclined to characterize Stafford as “elegant” rather than “vivid” – but he turned out to be the best Prince Ivan I’d seen in a decade. His interactions with the Firebird were by turns wondering, predatory, playful, respectful – and, most importantly, utterly different from his response to the Princess. His presentation of himself really is more effaced in his solos than when he’s dancing with someone, which is somewhat paradoxical, I suppose. (Re his performance as Paris in R+J: never has anyone in lavender tights managed to look so Establishment. I have no idea if that was the intended effect or not, but I liked it anyway. It doesn't say much for the production that he actually lucked out by getting the lavender tights instead of the yellow or turquise ones. And why oh why did Juliet have to spend three quarters of the ballet running around in her slip when everyone else was fully dressed? You know, I've had that nightmare, and it wasn't any fun. :pinch: )

And I agree – Abi Stafford has indeed blossomed over the past year or so – I thought she looked great in Russian Seasons and just terrific in Symphony in Three Movements. I’m sure her turn will come.

Anyway, congratulations to all, and ditto-ditto-ditto the cheers for Hall’s long overdue promotion.

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Congratulations to all the dancers!!!

I find it a bit interesting that Sterling is the only woman who was promoted. Does NYCB usually promote more men dancers than female dancers?

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What's with all the aCs and TMs on the official NYCB ac TM announcement? They make everything look smudged and a pain to read. I know Ballet Talk is not to blame.

Looks like Trade Mark marks.

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What's with all the aCs and TMs on the official NYCB ac TM announcement? They make everything look smudged and a pain to read. I know Ballet Talk is not to blame.

Looks like Trade Mark marks.

But Mr. Martins then is trade-marked. I thought only Mr. Balanchine was in that class.

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[Looks like Trade Mark marks.

But Mr. Martins then is trade-marked. I thought only Mr. Balanchine was in that class.

You may have thought so but Mr Martins evidently a greater sense of his own value

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Actually, looking at the original release - it's an apostrophe! :) I'll try to fix it.

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Fixed! (I think). It might have been a Mac vs PC thing. Hope it's easier to read.

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How great to see the company renewing itself with new, young talent.

Say what you will about changes in coaching, skill level or repetoire at NYCB - at least the company doesn't stand still, frozen in the headlights of its own legacy. It's dynamic and evolving, constantly fresh.

And ditto-ditto-ditto on the long-overdue promotion of Craig Hall. He's one of my favorite dancers anywhere.

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I agree that Hyltin does not have the experience and depth for Principal status, but also feel that Reichlin should not be a Principal, as she is not very musical, and seems to me to lack depth and a dramatic range. I haven't seen enough of young Fairchild to judge him, but am very, very cheered that at last Hall and Suozzi have been recognized.

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'SingerWhoMoves' date='May 17 2007, 01:10 AM' post='203997']

So sad to be out of NYC for this- but I was just browsing the company website, and noticed that Erica is now listed as a member of the Corps de ballet. Congratulations Erica!

- from the most recent Reviews thread re R & J.

Thank you, I'm so glad it has finally been publised! Erica Pereira is now a member of the corps! I have no idea if there's been any other acknowledgement but she was told right after her second performance on Saturday. This could not have happened to a nicer, more down to earth, and lovely person. :wink::(:yahoo:

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'SingerWhoMoves' date='May 17 2007, 01:10 AM' post='203997']

So sad to be out of NYC for this- but I was just browsing the company website, and noticed that Erica is now listed as a member of the Corps de ballet. Congratulations Erica!

- from the most recent Reviews thread re R & J.

Thank you, I'm so glad it has finally been publised! Erica Pereira is now a member of the corps! I have no idea if there's been any other acknowledgement but she was told right after her second performance on Saturday. This could not have happened to a nicer, more down to earth, and lovely person. :clapping::flowers::yahoo:

Brava Brava Erica :yahoo: :yahoo:

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Erica's promotion did not make it to Friday night's program, but DID make it to the Saturday matinee program's company roster.

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I think it's a travesty that Sterling Hyltin was promoted over Tess Reichlen, who is a much more mature dancer. Sterling is benefitting from her starring role as Juliet, but is that reason to promote her so soon after joining the company? She has yet to perform a wide range of Balanchine roles. Tess should have been promoted, it's a shame.

The PM never gets it right. Promotions are received, not always on merit.

Look at his favorites

As for Tess she is lucky and does well. What about the numbers in :thumbsup: corps

Many have been there since they were 8 years old. Too bad the Company hasn't a Union

where problems of dancers could be fairly talked over and fairly judged. One Dane with a willing

star-struck board answers few questions because there are none.

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The PM never gets it right. Promotions are received, not always on merit.

Look at his favorites

As for Tess she is lucky and does well. What about the numbers in :thumbsup: corps

Many have been there since they were 8 years old. Too bad the Company hasn't a Union

where problems of dancers could be fairly talked over and fairly judged. One Dane with a willing

star-struck board answers few questions because there are none.

The board of directors of a ballet company is not charged with making personnel decisions. Artistic directors, or in NYCB parlance, Ballet-Master-In-Chiefs, are the ones who are. The POB model of having dancers "audition" for promotions is rare, and from the descriptions on our POB forum, the final decisions are often questioned.

Artistic Directors/Ballet Masters make decisions based on their own aesthetic and what they think the company needs, short of pressure from influential board members and/or donors, who are overstepping their bounds if they use this influence, or political oversight people and well-connected generals and members of national intelligence, both of which in Soviet times were considered to be within their bounds and enforcing the political code of the nation. Unions get involved when there is an actionable omission or action: discrimination based on age, gender, race, etc.

What you or I or other Ballet Talk members would consider merit is a perfectly reasonable discussion point on Ballet Talk, as are noting specific patterns. (For choosing youth, Mr. Martins hardly has a monopoly.) When Peter Boal announced the last series of promotions at PNB, I scratched my head at a couple, not because the chosen dancers didn't deserve promotions, but because I wondered "why X and not Y?" (And he is as well-respected as any AD in the world.) However, a discussion of Mr. Martins' motivations, unless he's expressed them, is not within policy, and we don't get the meeting notes of the board.

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