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Ballet's/Extracts with Multiple Titles -


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I was curious as to why the Petipa/Glazunov "Les Ruses d'Amour" (The Pranks of Love / The Tricks of Love) has a few different titles - I have seen it as "Lady Soubrette", and "The Trial of Damis"......what gives?

Also theres the Pugni/Saint-Leon reconstructed by Lacotte (and his wife?) "La Vivandiere" Pas de Six, which is also given as the "Markitenka" Pas de Six. I have 2 films of this performance, both with Yelena Pankova and Sergei Vikharev - the first, recorded in a studio (not live) is on the film "Kirov Classics" AKA "The Maryinsky Ballet", the second, filmed live, is on the film "The Kirov Ballet in London". The London film gives the Pas as "La Vivandiere" while the "Maryinsky Ballet" film gives it as "Markitenka". I know that Saint-Leon was notorious for taking dances from this or that ballet and putting them into other ballets. In "Letter from a Ballet Master" Guest lists ballets that have dances from multiple works, perhpas this is the case with the Pas in question?

Then theres the very fun Pugni/Petipa "Satanella" PDD, which is given as both "The Carnival in Venice" as well as "The Fascination PDD" or simply "Pas de Deux" from "Satanella" - I have sewen both of these credits for this Pas come from the Mariinsky. In "Diaries of Marius Petipa" Garafola lists a work titled "Satanilla" or "Love and Hell", staged 1848 by Petipa after Mazilier's original of 1840. Also in "Diaries" she lists the "Venetian Carnival Grand Pas de Deux" of 1859, music by Cesare Pugni on a theme by Nicolo Paganini. Perhaps the Pas found its way into "Satanilla" througout it's Russian performance history? Or is "Satanilla" and "Satanella" two different works?

Good ol' Confusing ballet music history........I love it!

Thanks guys!

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"Markitenka" is just "vivandière" translated into Russian. If it were an American WWII movie, it would be translated, "The Gal from the PX."

"Carnival of Venice" was an old and much respected vaudeville-style play with songs, stand-up comedy, dramatic sketches, song, dance, specialty acts (think plate-spinners) and trained animals. Apparently, Satanella was a transformation of the very slim story-line entirely into ballet. They may have retitled it to sell tickets, rather than make the customers think they were going to do that old thing again.

"Ruses d'Amour" had a subtitle of "The Trials of Damis". It's one of those late Petipa ballets that could have been comfortably viewed by his old teacher, Vestris. As Petipa got on in years, he became much more conservative. I think "Lady Soubrette" was a revival title, but I'm not sure.

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"Markitenka" is just "vivandière" translated into Russian. If it were an American WWII movie, it would be translated, "The Gal from the PX."

"Carnival of Venice" was an old and much respected vaudeville-style play with songs, stand-up comedy, dramatic sketches, song, dance, specialty acts (think plate-spinners) and trained animals. Apparently, Satanella was a transformation of the very slim story-line entirely into ballet. They may have retitled it to sell tickets, rather than make the customers think they were going to do that old thing again.

"Ruses d'Amour" had a subtitle of "The Trials of Damis". It's one of those late Petipa ballets that could have been comfortably viewed by his old teacher, Vestris. As Petipa got on in years, he became much more conservative. I think "Lady Soubrette" was a revival title, but I'm not sure.

"The Gal from the PX" :clapping: - How about "The Gal from the Commissary"? As an American Army Brat myself I can appreciate those titles.

Thanks very much Mel for the clarification!

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