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I was just browsing through the City Center website (www.nycitycenter.org) and found that the repertoire and schedule for the ABT fall season, which runs from October 19 to November 6, is up:

American Ballet Theatre

Oct 19, 7:00 PM

Gala

Gong

Afternoon of a Faun

Pas de Deux

Rodeo

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Oct 20, 7:30 PM

Les Sylphides

Afternoon of a Faun

Pas de Deux

New Quanz Work

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Oct 21, 8:00 PM

Apollo

Gong

The Green Table

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Oct 22, 2:00 PM

Les Sylphides

Afternoon of a Faun

Pas de Deux

Rodeo

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Oct 22, 8:00 PM

New Quanz Work

Gong

Rodeo

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Oct 23, 2:00 PM

Gong

Apollo

Rodeo

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Oct 25, 7:30 PM

Apollo

Gong

The Green Table

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Oct 26, 7:30 PM

New Quanz Work

Dark Elegies

In the Upper Room

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Oct 27, 7:30 PM

Apollo

Pas de Deux

Rodeo

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Oct 28, 8:00 PM

Les Sylphides

Dark Elegies

In the Upper Room

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Oct 29, 2:00 PM

New Quanz Work

Gong

The Green Table

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Oct 29, 8:00 PM

Les Sylphides

Afternoon of a Faun

Pas de Deux

In the Upper Room

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Oct 30, 2:00 PM

Les Sylphides

Dark Elegies

The Green Table

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Nov 01, 7:30 PM

New Quanz Work

Dark Elegies

In the Upper Room

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Nov 02, 7:30 PM

Les Sylphides

Apollo

The Green Table

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Nov 03, 7:30 PM

Gong

Dark Elegies

In the Uppper Room

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Nov 04, 8:00 PM

New Quanz Work

Afternoon of a Faun

Pas de Deux

Rodeo

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Nov 05, 2:00 PM

Apollo

Dark Elegies

In the Upper Room

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Nov 05, 8:00 PM

Apollo

Pas de Deux

The Green Table

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Nov 06, 2:00 PM

New Quanz Work

Afternoon of a Faun

Pas de Deux

In the Upper Room

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Tickets go on sale online on July 11.

Does anyone know when casting usually goes up?

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Apollo :P Upper Room :party-smiley-017:

It looks like a great season. Unfortunately, October has me spending chunks of time elsewhere. :nopity:

Thanks, Giselle. I think (am not sure) casting first appears in the Times on the Sunday six weeks before opening day.

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Giselle05, thanks for posting this - I would never have thought to look this early. My guess is that they’ll have casting up by August, but that it will change a great deal by October.

Wow, very interesting repertory choices - The Green Table, Dark Elegies, Rodeo, Afternoon of a Faun & Apollo!!!!!!!!!

I’ll bet we’re going to get to see David Hallberg in Apollo :P:(:yahoo:

I’ll bet we’re going to get to see David Hallberg in Apollo :huepfen024: :huepfen024: :huepfen024:

I’ll bet we’re going to get to see David Hallberg in Apollo :toot::toot::toot:

Think I'm excited?

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I'm sorry to say that I'm only familiar with three of these- Apollo, Gong, and Les Sylphides. :o

Upon browsing through ABT's reportory archive, I've found that their Afternoon of a Faun is Nijinsky's staging. I'll bet it's very different from NYCB's version...?

What sort of piece is Upper Room and The Green Table? I wish I had some sort of idea :blush:

Anyone? :D

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The Upper Room is a major (IMO) work by Twyla Tharp to music by Philip Glass.

The Robbins Faun (which NYCB) dances is in some ways a gloss on the Nijinsky, but the look is entirely different. Try visiting this page, put up by the New York Public Library. Once there, for another photo, click "Choreographer."

The Green Table, an example of German Expressionism, is an anti-war ballet. I'm sure Mel will be able to elaborate on this, and I hope he does.

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Oddly enough, City Center took the ABT page down (it was up on Thursday). I'm betting they are going to do the Robbins Afternoon of a Faun (at least, that's what I hope).

Nice to see ABT doing Tharp again. Hopefully, that means their problems with Tharp are in the past.

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I think the page was taken down because it went up too soon :blush: ABT has yet to announce the season. We've seen this happen before -- a theater announces a program before the company does and then has to take it off its website.

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"The Green Table" was choreographed by Kurt Jooss as a memorial to those who died in the Great War (WWI). Ironically, it became a bridge between two World Wars, and is now presented as a memorial to the dead of both conflicts. It is ironic, tender, witty, biting, and unforgettable.

The Diplomats, in their morning suits and grotesque masks are discovered around the Green Table, disputes arise, and the assembly draw their pistols and fire!

Death, in the panoply of the War God, unfolds and begins this magnificent danse macabre. The various characters of the War appear, the Standard Bearer, the Young Soldier, the Old Soldier, an Old Mother, a Young Girl, the Guerilla Woman, and others. Last of all is the Profiteer, a truly oily part wonderful in its evil.

One by one, the participants are carried away, one way or another by Death, and I won't spoil how. You must see it.

At the end, we are back at the Green Table, where the Diplomats reprise what they were doing when the lights went up. A sense of Grim Inevitable falls, as does the curtain.

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I saw “The Green Table” back in January of 1981. The Cleveland Ballet danced it at BAM (Brooklyn Academy of Music.) I wasn’t too impressed with the Cleveland Ballet, but I was overwhelmed by Dennis Nahat as Death. (Didn’t Nahat dance with ABT at some point in the past?) It was an incredibly powerful performance, so powerful that I have always wanted to see “The Green Table” performed again. And unfortunately it’s more relevant now than it was in 1981. Now if only ABT would perform “A Month in the Country” before Ferri and Bocca retire. They would be magical in that ballet.

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Thank you, Mel, for that wonderful description. :)

Colleen, you have definetely aroused my interests. :rolleyes: I'm hoping there is something in the Fall repertoire for Ferri and Bocca to dance together. What is "A Month in the Country" like?

Editing: Just found it on my "Great Pas de Deux" video, and I've also enjoyed reading about it on the forum in "Ballets". It is indeed beautiful- and Ferri and Bocca would be magical in it. It's a pity that it most likely will not happen. :)

Edited by Giselle05
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Green Table was revived by Joffrey during the Vietnam/Cold War era -- and it was the BIG hit of their New York season at the time -- I mean, intense, passionate standing ovations for the ballet as well as for the performances and production. Much of the appeal was precisely because of the pompous old-fashioned and gestures look of the diplomats and their nasty games, but especially for the powerful, truly awesome, terrible figure of Death. I hope it still resonates with audiences today. Most of the issues that motivated Joos post World War One are certainly still with us.

Mel (and others who've seen this), who would be your casting choice for Death?

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An official announcement:

AMERICAN BALLET THEATRE’S 2005 SEASON AT CITY CENTER,

OCTOBER 19-NOVEMBER 6, ANNOUNCED

COMPANY PREMIERES OF JEROME ROBBINS’ AFTERNOON OF A FAUN AND KURT JOOSS’ THE GREEN TABLE AND WORLD PREMIERE OF NEW WORK BY PETER QUANZ TO HIGHLIGHT SEASON

Revivals of Agnes de Mille’s Rodeo, George Balanchine’s Apollo,

Twyla Tharp’s In The Upper Room and Antony Tudor’s Dark Elegies Also Planned

The Company Premieres of Jerome Robbins’ Afternoon of a Faun and Kurt Jooss’The Green Table will highlight American Ballet Theatre’s 2005 City Center season, October 19-November 6. A World Premiere by choreographer Peter Quanz and the revivals of Agnes de Mille’s Rodeo, George Balanchine’s Apollo, Twyla Tharp’s In The Upper Room and Antony Tudor’s Dark Elegies are also scheduled. The season was announced today by Artistic Director Kevin McKenzie.

Principal Dancers for the City Center engagement include Maxim Beloserkovsky, Jose Manuel Carreño, Angel Corella, Herman Cornejo, Irina Dvorovenko, Marcelo Gomes, Paloma Herrera, Julie Kent, Gillian Murphy, Xiomara Reyes, Ethan Stiefel and Michele Wiles.

American Ballet Theatre’s 2005 Fall season at City Center will kick off with an Opening Night Gala at 7:00 P.M. on Wednesday evening, October 19 featuring ABT’s Principal Dancers performing selections of the season’s works. ABT’s Opening Night Gala is generously sponsored by Malo.

Countrywide Financial is the National Sponsor of American Ballet Theatre and Cole Haan is a Leading Benefactor. Graff is the 2005 City Center Season Sponsor. ABT’s 2005 City Center season is also made possible with public funds from the New York State Council on the Arts, a state agency, and the National Endowment for the Arts.

World Premiere

A new work by choreographer Peter Quanz will receive its World Premiere on Thursday evening, October 20. Quanz’s new work is set to Piano Concerto No. 5 in F Major by Charles Camille Saint-Saëns and features costumes by Holly Hynes, scenery by Robert Perdziola and lighting by Brad Fields. This new ballet will be Quanz’s first work for American Ballet Theatre. He previously choreographed SpringScape for the ABT Studio Company in 2003.

American Ballet Theatre gratefully acknowledges The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation for its generous support of this new work.

Company Premieres

American Ballet Theatre will present Jerome Robbins’ Afternoon of a Faun and Kurt Jooss’ The Green Table for the first time this season.

Robbins’ Afternoon of a Faun will be given its ABT Company Premiere on Thursday evening, October 20. Set to music by Claude Debussy with costumes by Irene Sharaff and décor and lighting by Jean Rosenthal, Afternoon of a Faun was given its World Premiere by New York City Ballet at City Center in 1953. A pas de deux based on the themes of a poem by Stéphane Mallarmé, Afternoon of a Faun is dedicated to Tanaquil Le Clercq for whom Robbins choreographed the ballet. Jean-Pierre Frohlich will stage the production for ABT.

Kurt Jooss’ The Green Table (The Dance of Death in 8 Scenes), staged by Anna Markard, will have its Company Premiere on Friday evening, October 21. Inspired by World War I and its aftermath, The Green Table is set to music by Frederick Cohen with costumes by Hein Heckroth, and lighting and masks by Hermann Markard. The Green Table was given its World Premiere by Jooss Ballet in Paris in 1932 with the choreographer portraying the role of Death.

American Ballet Theatre’s production of The Green Table has been made possible with public funds from the New York State Council on the Arts, a state agency.

Revivals

The 2005 City Center season will also be highlighted by four revivals of works from American Ballet Theatre’s repertory. Agnes de Mille’s Rodeo will be performed for the first time since 2001 at the matinee on Saturday, October 22. Celebrating de Mille’s centennial this year, the Company will give five performances of Rodeo, one of the choreographer’s signature works. Set to music by Aaron Copland with scenery by Oliver Smith and costumes by Santo Loquasto, Rodeo, subtitled The Courting at Burnt Ranch, was given its World Premiere at the Metropolitan Opera House by the Ballet Russe de Monte Carlo in 1942. It was first presented by Ballet Theatre in 1950 in Wiesbaden, Germany. Paul Sutherland will stage the revival of Rodeo for ABT, with assistance from Christine Sarry.

George Balanchine’s Apollo, set to music by Igor Stravinsky, will be given seven performances beginning Friday evening, October 21. ABT’s production of Apollo, staged by Richard Tanner, will include the birth scene. Apollo was given its World Premiere by Diaghilev’s Ballets Russes in 1928 and was first performed by Ballet Theatre in 1943 at the Metropolitan Opera House. The Company last performed Apollo in 1998.

Antony Tudor’s Dark Elegies will also be revived this year with six performances being given beginning Wednesday evening, October 26. Dark Elegies, a ballet portraying members of a community mourning the loss of their children, is set to music by Gustav Mahler with scenery and costumes by Nadia Benois and lighting by Jean Rosenthal. Dark Elegies received its World Premiere by Ballet Rambert in 1937 and was first presented by Ballet Theatre in 1940. Last performed by ABT in 1990, the ballet will be staged by Donald Mahler.

Twyla Tharp’s In The Upper Room will be given its Revival Premiere on Wednesday, October 26. A ballet in nine parts, In The Upper Room, staged for ABT by Keith Roberts, features music by Philip Glass, costumes by Norma Kamali and lighting by Jennifer Tipton. Last performed by ABT in 1995, In The Upper Room received its World Premiere by Twyla Tharp Dance in 1986 and was given its ABT Premiere in 1988.

Returning Repertory

American Ballet Theatre’s three-week season at City Center will feature the return of Michel Fokine’s Les Sylphides and Mark Morris’ Gong.

Les Sylphides, set to the music of Frederic Chopin, will be given six performances beginning Thursday evening, October 20. This romantic one-act plotless work was premiered by Ballet Theatre, staged by Fokine, at the Company’s inaugural performance on January 11, 1940. Les Sylphides received its World Premiere as Chopiniana by the Maryinsky Theatre in 1908 and was staged for Serge Diaghilev’s Ballet Russes a year later in the form we know today. ABT’s current production, which received its Revival Premiere during the Company’s 2004 City Center season, is staged by Kirk Peterson with assistance from Susan Jones. The ballet features scenery by Alexandre Benois and lighting by David K.H. Elliott.

Mark Morris’s Gong, last performed by ABT in 2002, will be given six performances beginning Friday evening, October 21. Gong, staged by Tina Fehlandt, features music by Colin McPhee with costumes by Isaac Mizrahi and lighting by Michael Chybowski. A ballet for fifteen dancers, Gong was given its World Premiere by ABT in 2001.

Tickets for American Ballet Theatre’s 2005 Fall season at City Center are priced from $25-$90 and are on sale now by mail, online at www.abt.org or by calling CityTix at 212-581-1212. Discounts are available for packages of three of more performances. The box office will open Sunday, August 28. City Center is located on West 55th Street between 6th and 7th Avenues in New York City. For more information, please visit ABT’s website at www.abt.org <http://www.abt.org/> .

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A potentially very disappointing season: same Old cast of Pricipals: where are those "new" company members Acosta and Vishneva? Where is Acosta when Apollo is given? Where is Vishneva when juice is needed? Some of the returning old ballets might make the "once see" list for those who haven't seen them. And a maybe re-look at Tharp. But unless non-principal names like Fang and Lane (and should-be principal name Part) post up in non-trivial roles, and soon enough in advance so that decent seats can be purchased, well, money better saved up for NYCB's winter season.

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Good news about 'The Green Table'...I haven't seen it since the Joffrey, and try as I will, I cannot remember the name of the dancer who was so very effective as Death...it might have been in the 60's or later---I seem to recall the dancer's name started with 'Z'.

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A potentially very disappointing season: same Old cast of Pricipals: where are those "new" company members Acosta and Vishneva?

Principal Dancers for the City Center engagement include Maxim Beloserkovsky, Jose Manuel Carreño, Angel Corella, Herman Cornejo, Irina Dvorovenko, Marcelo Gomes, Paloma Herrera, Julie Kent, Gillian Murphy, Xiomara Reyes, Ethan Stiefel and Michele Wiles.
The operative word "include" means that there may be others. Actually, I hope the company takes advantage of an opportunity to showcase its younger dancers.

Although, the idea of a Costas-Vishneva-Malakhov Rodeo is most intriguing! :)

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Not to take anything away from Hallberg, but I kind of got stuck imagining Marcelo Gomes in Faun. Wouldn't even matter who his partner is. :wub:

Fang could be beautiful in Dark Elegies. :)

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Some of the returning old ballets might make the "once see" list for those who haven't seen them. And a maybe re-look at Tharp.

Really? I haven't seen any of these ballets, except for Les Sylphides (and it's highly unlikely I'll see this sezason at all), but my impression is that it's a very varied and interesting season. Aren't most of these ballets considered 'important' (bad word, I know, but I can't think of anything better at the moment) - even if not masterpieces or even if not danced by the greatest of stars. It's actually a repertory based season and not a star-based season. Just my (not too knowledgable) two cents.

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