Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Mel Johnson

Grand Old Men and Women

Recommended Posts

Carbro, please refresh my memory for me, did Hayden's studio become Darvash's studio (& then Steps for a brief while?) when Hayden went up to vitalize Skidmore's dance department? (Or have I got it all mixed up?)

Share this post


Link to post

Close, but a little mixed.

Hayden's studio became Steps 60th. It was on the fourth floor. Darvash was below. (Trust me, I know :) )

Also, though this is becoming off-topic, I've not studied with Hayden but I have interviewed her. She's fascinating, intelligent and a very tough cookie. I've known more than one girl she's reduced to tears, at least one very talented girl she drove to quit, and others who owe their careers to her. Age is probably the least of the discussable things about her.

Share this post


Link to post

Gillian Murphy in Pointe Magazine (June-July 2005) re her teacher Hayden --

QUOTE:

___________________

"'If she told you to do something, you could do it,' Murphy says. 'I don't think I heard her say, 'This is a difficult step but give it a shot.' Instead it was, "You're doing to do this. No excuses.'"

"'She can be pretty hardcore. You know, there are a lot of horror stories out there about her, but for some reason the two of us connected. We got past the teacher-student thing. From the start, she's been very generous.'"

_____________________

Of course, teacher's can't be evaluated only by the way they relate to brilliant students. That part must be easy.

Share this post


Link to post

I also wanted to mention Marika Besobrasova- she has taught (and still teaches- WOW!!!! :) ) generations of dancers.

My former ballet mistress who retired from stage about 15 years ago used to be one of her students in Monte Carlo. Now she is an experienced teacher herself teaching for 11 years already. Funny!

Share this post


Link to post

Maria Teresa Carrizo who performed and taught for many years in Venezuela and the US is still going, I believe she just turned 70. One of her teachers was a student of Maestro Cecchetti although I'm sad to say I don't recall his name.

Though not as svelte and mobile as she once was, she occasionally demonstrates some barre (and still has much better turnout than I'll ever have) but mostly marks with her hands and describes. There's no way of misunderstanding what she wants you to do. :)

Share this post


Link to post

Coming to this thread rather late, but now I have read it all. In the beginning Marga talks of tradition and experience which you get from older teachers. I will give you a line-up:

Cleo Nordi - taught by Legat

Legat - taught by Johansson

Johansson - taught by Bournonville

Bournonville - taught by Vestris

How is that for tradition?

Well, I was taught by Nordi. The mind boggles... If that isn't tradition, then what is!

Makes me eternally grateful when I think of it this way. :tiphat: :hyper:

Share this post


Link to post

I must pay tribute to the lovely Mary Munro, who, at 76, is a youngster among some others mentioned. Ms. Munro was a ballerina with Ballet Rambert in the early 1950s. She returned to New Orleans after Katrina and gives class "among the ruins" two blocks from my home. The studio has been reduced to its studs, and we sometimes even wear jackets and scarves while taking class (yes, it does get quite chilly here, esp. in a 'challenged' building). What an incredible picture I wish all of you could see -- some quite wonderful dancers, really, all gathered together under less than ideal circumstances, all dedicated to keeping on taking class and dancing. And every day, Ms. Munro still has that lovely disposition, no matter what. And, she can pull the most logical and beautiful combinations out of her ... well, I don't know quite where she pulls them out of. But she is so pleasant and elegant and still ready with a story or two when we get stumped.

And, yes, she still demonstrates. She's got those lightining quick little feet.

(BTW, for any of you who are familiar with my circumstances, I've taken a leave from Milwaukee Ballet, to 'help with the cause' down here and get some closure as well). We are striving to keep dance alive and well here.

Share this post


Link to post

Mary Munro?! :tiphat:

She was one of my teachers at Rambert - way back when I was there!

Funny Face, I'll try to pm you .. maybe you could say "hi" for me to her?

-d-

Share this post


Link to post
I must pay tribute to the lovely Mary Munro, who, at 76, is a youngster among some others mentioned.  Ms. Munro was a ballerina with Ballet Rambert in the early 1950s.  She returned to New Orleans after Katrina and gives class "among the ruins" two blocks from my home.

Funny Face, thank you for posting this. I'm in awe. This is a deeply moving story about the power of an artist's commitment to her art.

Share this post


Link to post

Yes, Ms. Munro is like that.

She made dancing seem somehow easier.

Everything had a place and a meaning and a feeling.

There was nothing superfluous.

I never saw her dance onstage, but she must have been lovely.

-d-

Share this post


Link to post

Hey Funny Face--

Thanks for going back to N O to help out!

My mother's family is from there for generations and generations, and I can't tell you how heartsick it's made me to know the state New Orleans is in -- "sola, perduta, abbandonata."

I know parts of town aren't in too bad a shpte -- the area around St Philip St where I lived one year seems to be fine, but I know my grandmother's house on Canal Blvd was washed away, and I gather the cemetery is inaccessible, too.

I'm trying to picture your classes -- what street are y'all on? I'd love to know.

MERDE!!!! and Happy Mardi Gras!

Share this post


Link to post
Sign in to follow this  
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...