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Roma

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Everything posted by Roma

  1. "it opened in 1933 on the fourth floor of an old building on 59th & Madison." I remember reading that it was also Isadora Duncan's studio at one time. (One critic/dance historian, who shall remain nameless, even wrote (and published!) that he thought that Serenade, having been created more or less in that space, was obviously very much influenced by Duncan's dancing by way of the lurking spirit (or was it the actual ghost?) of Duncan herself. Apparently, for some minds, too much history is not a healthy thing)
  2. That was really something! And apparently she is guesting with NYCB this winter
  3. Bubble wrap? I don't know-- it looks like alien regurgitation to me. Can't imagine anything that would be more out of place in that neighbourhood (or city, for that matter). As for the last design--wonder what it would look like under a foot of snow. Hmm...
  4. I did say in my letter that since they discontinued Tobias's column I would discontinue my subscription. And I did. Of course, I didn't even get a form letter in reply. Oh, well.
  5. I did say in my letter that since they discontinued Tobias's column I would discontinue my subscription. And I did. Of course, I didn't even get a form letter in reply. Oh, well.
  6. the oddessa recording can be bought at www.dancebooks.co.uk
  7. Ok, this may be a tough one. Does anyone know to which mazurka the ballerina's solo in Les Sylphides was danced in 1909? Cyril Beaumont in his "Complete Book of Ballets" has it as op.33 no.3 (which has, I understand, become the guy's mazurka in Russia). I have a Robert Irving recording according to which the girl's mazurka is in D op.33 no.2 and the boy's is in C op.67 no.3 (same as in Reynolds' book) So did Beaumont get it wrong? Is it a misprint or was the music changed?
  8. Dale, thank you so much for your comments on Part. It really is amazing how two people can see the same exact performance and take away such drastically different impressions. But that's probably the best part:) About Emeralds though. To me it is such a self-contained private world, and that's how it should be danced--as if unaware of the audience. (It's somewhat similar to the adagio of Bizet in this way). Part was very much aware of us watching her, and she showed it. Maybe that's what bothered me most about her performance. But then again, I often think that what we love (or not) about a
  9. I was there Thursday and Friday. Aside from the radiant performances of Ayupova, Pavlenko, and Vishneva, Jewels, though valiantly attempted, was not, as far as I am concerned, a great success. A far cry from the glowing performances given by Miami City Ballet last June. It seems to be a very fragile work, and perhaps the reason the ballets didn’t look quite right is because of who the stagers were. Nothing against Borne, von Aroldingen, and Leland, but Verdy, McBride, and Farrell they are not. Nevertheless, it was a good effort and I think it’s fantastic that the Kirov has it and other Balan
  10. Well, I went to the Saturday matinee hoping to see Pavlenko in SL. Alas, it was not to be. She was there to be sure, behind Zakharova as a demi soloist swan. I had seen Zakharova’s Diamonds, and thought her quite great in the role—the first dancer ever to make me not think of Farrell while watching her. The musicality, amplitude, and fluidity of her dancing created an impression of melting grandeur. She was a bit distant perhaps, but the overall effect was one of almost majestic brilliance. (The “almost” is for her hideous, touch-your-nose-with-your-foot grand battements in the finale). I
  11. Daria Pavlenko and Igor Kolb in Act I. http://www.ballerinagallery.com/pic/pavle03.jpg
  12. I saw Tuesday evening and Wednesday matinee performances. Vishneva is a beautiful dancer, and I have always liked her in the past, but Nikya is just not her role. She is much too earthy for it--I was half expecting her to pull out a fan, and break out in a Don Q variation. Also, at times, she seemed more than a little mannered--all that chest arching, and so on. The ballet as a whole didn't come together around her. Fadeyev was a poetic, if meek Solor. Perhaps he and Pavlenko would have made a better match. Daria was simply stunning yesterday, and I thought her portrayal very convincing, d
  13. Leigh, I am pretty sure Titania was made on/for Diana Adams and Hayden was more or less a last minute substitute for her when she became indisposed. It's interesting that in the play Hippolyta was actually at some point Oberon's lover (one of many), as Theseus was Titania's, so the distiction between fairy and human is not so harshly drawn as in "The Dream".
  14. Juliet, I agree with you. Eifman and Farrell are definitely mutually exclusive, though I am sure she will figure hugely in his "life of Balanchine" ballet. Martins is very skilled at saying all the right things (ie "This is Balanchine's House, blah, blah, blah"), but he was never a believer--he simply wanted the director's chair. If Balanchine ever mistreated him, he has avenged himself well, and perhaps there is some of that in commissioning Eifman. I can't explain inviting that bombast in any other way. And when he does come, Martins will say, " here is a choreographer from Balanchine's na
  15. Farrell Fan, you mean The Ultimate Authority in Chief?;) I long to see Liebeslieder Waltzer staged by Verdy and/or Farrell. I can dream, can't I?
  16. Jeannie, when cast changes happen due to injuries they are always regrettable, but is something we accept as inevitable. Swapping dancers between dates or daytimes, in order to take away “the privilege of the first night” from one and give it to the other, and so on, after casting has been announced and tickets bought accordingly, is simply rude. The reason it happens so often with Russian companies is that at home, the percentage of their income that comes from ticket sales is so meager that they don’t really care about their audience. ABT knows principle casting five months in advance, but i
  17. Calliope, what I meant is that NYCB was created to serve one man's vision, not a multitude of opinions. In that sense it was not a Workshop.
  18. Calliope, what I meant is that NYCB was created to serve one man's vision, not a multitude of opinions. In that sense it was not a Workshop.
  19. We can argue about the merits of the article for a long time, but I think that there is a larger point that Homans was trying to make. We were left a legacy, which is our cultural heritage, and we seem to be so ready and willing to put it aside and to erect something new in it’s place. There was an example that I kept thinking of throughout the discussion about details. There is a video at the NYPL of Maria Tallchief coaching Peter Boal and Judith Fugate in Scotch Symphony. Both knew the choreography very well, but Tallchief was just not happy with the way it looked and kept saying to F
  20. We can argue about the merits of the article for a long time, but I think that there is a larger point that Homans was trying to make. We were left a legacy, which is our cultural heritage, and we seem to be so ready and willing to put it aside and to erect something new in it’s place. There was an example that I kept thinking of throughout the discussion about details. There is a video at the NYPL of Maria Tallchief coaching Peter Boal and Judith Fugate in Scotch Symphony. Both knew the choreography very well, but Tallchief was just not happy with the way it looked and kept saying to F
  21. Apparently Putin requested that Shemyakin's "Nutcracker" be presented during Bush's visit, so that's what they saw.
  22. Thank you, Alexandra:) A slight change: Matvienko will have to be replaced in Jewels. He has left the Kirov to join the Dutch National Ballet. I only hope that that's the only "major" cast change will see:)
  23. Thank you, Alexandra:) A slight change: Matvienko will have to be replaced in Jewels. He has left the Kirov to join the Dutch National Ballet. I only hope that that's the only "major" cast change will see:)
  24. Well, apparently there was plenty of booing, hissing, stomping and screaming at the Bolshoi Theatre during the Benois de la Danse Gala last Saturday. When one of the ballets up for The Best New Choreography (or some such thing), a piece by Belgian Jan Fabre (sp?), called something like "My movements are as lonely as stray dogs", turned out to be a prolonged session of, I don't quite know how to put it, self-love, complete with drooling, screaming, and actual stuffed dogs (don't ask), the audience erupted in loud boos, began to stomp it's feet, screams of "get off the stage", "Shame", "Shame, G
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