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Simon G

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Everything posted by Simon G

  1. ...which she ordered of the same fabric she found Carla Fracci's skirt to be made of via sneaking on the Italian's dressing room in the middle of the night and cutting a piece from the underskirt... Oh Gelsey, Gelsey...too much Gelsey.. Maybe she was high at the time?
  2. Hunterman In terms of how fabric moves it's simply a question of economics. The more expensive the material the better the quality of movement, the pinnacle is silk, nothing moves, breathes, falls or mirrors a dancer's body like silk - the act 2 tutu of Giselle is a specific kind of tutu from the Romantic era of ballet, those ballets, with the exception of Giselle are rarely if ever performed (with honorable mentions to La Sylphide & Les Sylphides, which I know is not Romantic era, but the costumes are) in an ideal world all those tutus would be made of silk. Except silk is horrendously e
  3. If you're talking about the romantic tutu as Hunterman was, which is only seen in the second act of Giselle, Les Sylphides and on the Sylph in La Sylphide it's a very specific type of skirt and tutu. The majority of tutus are made of tulle, or durable fabrics which will last, can be shared amongst numerous ballerinas and dancers and are durable enough to last season after season. Companies can't afford silk especially expensive silk which has unique properties of movement, Nureyev got what he wanted for his dancers because he was Nureyev, though in several cases such as when he worked with t
  4. Hunterman the issue and art of costume design in dance is a massive one and often the whole purpose of design in a great deal of contemporary ballet and dance is specifically to distort or abstract the line of the body, to set up conflicts that classical ballet's costume designs specifically don't. Here's a couple of examples. The tutus designed by Stephen Galloway for William Forsythe's "The Vertiginous Thrill of Exactitude: Leigh Bowery's designs for "Hail The New Puritan" for The Michael Clark Company, a modern dance company trained in and using the ballet lexicon: Ther
  5. And yet more Trinidad Sevillano hits from the vaults. I just found this a snippet of her in Romeo & Juliet one of her greatest successes this time at the Teatro Colon possibly late 80s.
  6. It's a bit overwraught and cheesy in that 80s way. You keep expecting Crockett & Tubbs to burst in and start making arrests. It wasn't just the women of ENB who were incredible at that time, while the Royal was really in the doldrums with their underwhelming male roster ENB had Koen Onzia, Matz Skoog, Patrick Armand, Alessandro Molin, Peter Schaufuss, Martin James, Schaufuss also brought Julio Bocca to the West on his first engagements before ABT or the Royal. It was quite a company.
  7. I knew this existed and I found it. Another bit of Trinidad Sevillano memorabilia/ephemera this time a cheesey 80s pop video. In 1988 she was in a video for T'Pau's power ballade Valentine, it's poodle perms and shoulder pads at dawn. The male dancer is Koen Onzia. You might want to turn the sound down. It was filmed in the Old Sadlers Wells and I'm fairly certain the choreography is by Denzel Bailey who was one of the first black dancers to enter a mainstream company, English National Ballet:
  8. When the very young Lynn Seymour was emerging as a ballerina in the touring arm of Sadlers Wells she was given Swan Lake & Sleeping Beauty even though she didn't yet have the technique to pull off the fouettes or the rose adagio. She was given the roles because De Valois knew Seymour was a ballerina and whatever it took for her to build up the technique the investment in her talent was worth it. And bear in mind at this stage she was almost a total unknown and had only been in the company just under two years. In Swan Lake the deal was that she would try as many as possible and when she c
  9. Bart, Words can't describe how beautiful and phenomenal Sevillano was in the flesh. It's the reason why live performance is absolutely vital, visceral and important, however many bad or mediocre performances one has to sit through to get to a Sevillano, it's all worthwhile and why film is such a bad representation of a live performer of genius. And Sevillano really was a dance genius, you had to be there. Sevillano just had to enter and stand there and you took notice, some people just have that X quality that demands you look at them no matter what else is going on around them and her dance
  10. MH, I can't find any reference to her doing Ondine, or - so far - anyone who can remember her doing it. Of course that doesn't mean it didn't happen, so I'll keep asking, but I'd be surprised if such a potentially memorable piece of casting had made so little impact! I have a feeling that maybe Mme Hermine has mixed Sevillano up with Gelsey Kirkland who was supposed to dance the revival of Ondine for two performances at the ROH in October 1988, but pulled out at the eleventh hour due to tendonitis and was replaced by Maria Almeida. Sevillano worked closely with Kirkland on Giselle and sta
  11. About my curiosity on how do my fellow Bt'rs feel about this substitution...one that is quite rare. I'm sorry I insulted Alonso Cristian, I know she's very special to you. But that's the thing here, for whatever reason this interpolation on Sevillano's part was a one off, why she did it we'll never know, but she was a very special dancer, who had a pretty horrendous time of it and as Alexandra said never became the star everyone was sure she'd become. I know you mean nothing underhand by the youtube comparison clips, but I have to admit I hate youtube for dance as it destroys the visceral
  12. Okay then, but then what's this thread about? To take out of context one moment in time from one performace of a dancer from countless performances is meaningless. Just as if I were to take that video of Alonso at 78 dancing Giselle. But I know that's not Alonso, just as I know that's not Sevillano. To answer yes I prefer the hops to the the pique, pose pas de cheval Sevillano performed here, but I know that Sevillano performed the choreography as is on every occasion I saw her dance Giselle, so for whatever reason she subsitituted a different passage here and may very well have worked it o
  13. 1. There are many who saw Sevillano complete the hops, myself included on numerous occasions. You're basing your whole damning of her on 10 seconds of amateur film shot years ago. There's ample evidence of her technical virtuosity posted & on youtube, but that doesn't fit what seems to amount to a hustings against Sevillano. 2. You can't base a thorough knowledge of any dancer from one clip on youtube. Especially not great dancers who all have their off nights, off moments or in the case of late stage Alonso off decades. But I know that there's ample attesting to how great Alonso was and
  14. The Medora section in the Corsaire PDD & the Queen of the Dryads section from Don Q in the Kirov productions are the same, or rather in certain productions the same enchainement is used, though in the Corsaire it's a principal role in Don Q, a first soloist/soloist role. This just illustrates how fluid ballet actually is and how open to change, interpolations and especially in the classics the notion of a set in stone way of doing things is fallacious.
  15. I think that's the vital thing to remember that dance and dancers are flesh, bone, muscle which tends to get injured and sometimes they have to substitute or compensate in performance. Those hops were the same passage which ended Yulia Bolshakova's career, who was fast tracked by the Mariinsky for stardom, but whose foot injuries ended her career. In her first Giselle she was obviously in immense pain but insisted on trying that section, fell over badly several times where the smart move would have been to substitute like Sevillano did. It's not those small moments which make a performance it
  16. I have to say I feel very conflicted about this thread because it's not a fair, just or accurate representation of a very great ballerina, as other clips of Sevillano will attest to she had an immense capacity to balance and turn and so taken out of context a clip where she's compensating for something does her and her technical abilities a very great disservice as the implication is that this one moment lasting no more than ten seconds is synonymous with her career and how she portrayed Giselle throughout - something anyone who saw her can attest she didn't do. This is also what's so damagin
  17. Trinidad Sevillano really was one of the potential greats who never properly got anything near the recognition she deserved - she was originally a baby virtuoso taken into ENB at 15 as principal then had something of a peripatetic career, principal at Boston, then the Royal Ballet, never finding a permanent home though she did have some serious health issues not related to dancing. I've seen her do Giselle several times and she was gorgeous (though I was very very young at the time). The thing is you can't judge a dancer from a clip on youtube, nor make a case for a career on a snippet. The h
  18. It was a straight up spoken version of the play with movement direction and a few dance interludes by the Old Vic Company, most of the choreography was supplied by Helpmann, but with a nocturne divertissement choreographed by Ashton. Holloway was Bottom. The reason why it was staged at the Met when it travelled to NYC was because the sets and production were so lavish they needed a big enough stage to accommodate it all.
  19. Simon G

    Alina Somova

    Drew, I completely agree and I'd never equate box office draw with greatness in a dancer. I'd never trammel Van Hamel, I'm just over Somova.
  20. Simon G

    Alina Somova

    Individual opinion, yes, but golden! Just like Golden is the Mask Award for The Tsar Maiden. Just a pity none of that has translated into Box Office Gold.
  21. Miliosr He is so good, he really is the schizz. If you're ever in the UK he's definitely worth the ticket price to see him. English National Ballet are in a bit of sticky predicament at the moment, last year they had their funding cut by 7%, then this year it was announced they were to receive a further 15% cut and sadly it seems that those cuts are going to impact increasingly on dancers, they know that Muntagirov is their prize draw and that he's really revitalised a lot of public interest in ENB especially after the documentary on ENB which focused a great deal on him. This promotion aside
  22. Simon G

    Alina Somova

    You love Somova, that's fine for you she's the apogee of ballet, you are in a minority especially here but that's absolutely your right, I've always upheld that. To consider Somova a greater artist than Osipova is just silly, in every sense. And I daresay the Mariinsky don't agree otherwise Somova would be onstage a lot more and would actually be considered a box office draw. You can't possibly talk about a "luminous" stage presence when you haven't actually seen a dancer onstage. And to consider Fonteyn or Seymour or Grey (of whom there is nothing on Youtube). Moreover there are whole s
  23. Simon G

    Alina Somova

    Well, I can. Besides, technical virtuoso Bessmertnova was not. I also got carried away a bit in my previous post stating that Kolpakova doesn’t do it for me. She certainly does, but not the other Kirov period dancers mentioned in the same sentence, no matter how highly revered they might be by others. To say Bessmertnova had no technical virtuosity is nonsense. If Somova achieves an nth of the career and place in ballet history that Bessmertnova did she'd be lucky. Very lucky and given the reduction of her role and place within the Mariinsky that's looking increasingly unlikely.
  24. Simon G

    Alina Somova

    She's A principal of a ballet company which is using her less and less and hardly allowing her to dance at all. She has no international career to speak of and you say nothing will change this? Well it takes very little effort to change it, you simply don't cast the dancer at all till they either leave or fester or in the case of Mariinsky with certain dancers you get demoted or fired. May I ask what's this sudden obsession with Bessmertnova? Who stopped dancing over twenty years ago and who you've never seen dance? Moreover Bessmertnova was a Bolshoi ballerina not Mariinsky (then Kirov). I w
  25. Simon G

    Alina Somova

    I'm not trashing, I'm merely stating what a great many feel about the "beloved" Somova, who let's face it if she were half as beloved as you'd have us believe would be dancing a hell of a lot more and would actually have something of an international career fitting of a principal with the Mariinsky. The majority of the posters on these boards are American and you'll be hard pressed to find a single one championing her, nor is it a question of having a "crowd" the simple fact is that Somova is not a great dancer, her promotion was mystifying and her classical technique is very very poor. State
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