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atm711

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Everything posted by atm711

  1. I saw this production at its premiere, and the best description of that night can be found in Jack Anderson's book "The One and Only: Ballet Russe de Monte Carlo". It looked like a 'shoe-string' production. The only good thing about it was Danilova's dancing. We came to what we felt was a 'chestnut' with eyes that were attuned to Tudor, Robbins and Balanchine. The story was ridiculous and Frederic Franklin in armor was truly funny. I guess we have retrogressed.
  2. I hope I can do Youskevitch justice by trying to describe him. Bruhn probably admired his refined demeanor. Where Bruhn had a lyric elegance, there was a masculine simplicity about Youskevitch's classicism. During the war years whenever he was on furlough from the Navy he performed with the Ballet Russe and I saw him in Massine's Le Beau Danube and also performing the ribbon dance in "The Red Poppy" However, I saw him mainly with Ballet Theatre. At th e time he fit beautifully into the Company--there was simply no other Danseur Noble around (my apologies to Anton Dolin!) He had a good, clean technique, but not an elegant one (such as a Malakhov). He was a most wonderful Albrecht to Alonso, and he was the only Albrecht I saw who (in the 2nd Act) would catch in mid-air the lillies Giselle threw over her head. With a lesser dancer it could have looked like a circus act. One had the feeling that anything coming from Giselle must never be allowed to touch the ground. It invariably amuses me when most Albrecht's have to scurry and bend down to retrieve the lillies. I agree with you completely, Alexandra, about "Theme". Balanchine captured his qualities beautifully. And that wonderful diagonal with the tours and pirouettes was what he was all about. He also took on Tudor in "Shadow of the Wind". The ballet was not a success at the time, although I'd love to see it again. Also, there is the Gene Kelly (1952) movie with him--"Invitation to the Dance" A tough question--"Who is most like him today?---I have my eye on Belotserkovsky.
  3. In the 40's and 50's: Alonso and Youskevitch In the 60's and 70's Fracci and Bruhn In the 80's Makarova and Baryshnikov So far, no one in the 90's has captured my loyalty.
  4. Mme. Hermine and Roma--thank you. Please contact me if there is a copy out there!
  5. In her book, "Dancing on my Grave", Kirkland writes of a "Live From Lincoln Center" performance of herself and Baryshnikov in "Theme and Variations"; also on the program was Bujones in the "Don Q" PDD. Does anyone know anything about this Video?
  6. I saw the Miami Ballet last week at C.W.Post College on Long Island. I particularly liked Eric Quillere in "Four Temperaments" (Phlegmatic). We also saw Villela's work in progress -- "Mambo No. 2A.M." It will eventually be a 4-act ballet ab out 4 distinct social periods and the style of dances that signify the age. We saw the 4th act and it was a real crowd pleaser. The wonderful latin rhythms were by Pedro "Cuban Pete" Aguilar. I wonder if this is Villela's answer to "Four Temperaments"?
  7. I have always felt that Albrecht should have the decency to leave the stage. I could never understand why Giselle's mother would condone his clutching of her dying daughter.
  8. Perhaps John Mueller had Lynn Seymour's Giselle in mind when he made his accusations. In the video with Nureyev they appear to be pretty familiar with each other.
  9. Wonderful! Wonderful! It couldn't happen to a more deserving fellow.
  10. I have a copy of Alex Gard's "More Ballet Laughs" and there is a great cartoon depicting a production of "Giselle" for the Marquis de Cuevas' Company---Ballet International. Vera Nemtchinova (the Giselle) is being coached by Boris Romanoff, Anatole Obukhoff and Anton Dolin on the proper way to stab herself with the sword. So, it would seem to me, that these three august teachers agree it was suicide! On the question of the burial site...if, indeed, Giselle is really "out-of-her-mind" at the time of her demise---she can be buried in the Churchyard.
  11. I saw the Moscow Festival Ballet perform "Don Q" at a Long Island college a couple of weeks ago. Marina Rzhannikova had the necessary spirit and technique for a fine Kitri. All the female dancing was strong throughout the ballet...I would love to identify them by name, but the program gets too muddy for that! On the whole though, the male dancing was sloppy.
  12. Gregory always seemed to me to be "selling" herself to the audience in the worst possible way. She never gave the audience a chance to discover her on their own. She was always "in-your-face". To me, she seemed to be saying "Look at me! Here I am! Did you ever see anything this great!" Gregory's complaint about being overlooked because of Makarova is nonsense. As young ballerinas Alicia Alonso and Nora Kaye managed to have a devoted audience (and Press!) despite the guest appearances of Toumanova and Alicia Markova.
  13. Alexandra, I'm so glad you mentioned Danilova'a Myrtha. When I read comments about this and that ballerina and their interpretations of Myrtha--I have never commented--because I really hate to say---"You should have seen......" I only saw her do it once and it was near the end of her career---but her TOTAL command of the stage is something rarely seen today in Myrtha.
  14. Alexandra, I'm so glad you mentioned Danilova'a Myrtha. When I read comments about this and that ballerina and their interpretations of Myrtha--I have never commented--because I really hate to say---"You should have seen......" I only saw her do it once and it was near the end of her career---but her TOTAL command of the stage is something rarely seen today in Myrtha.
  15. Ed Waffle---I saw the Met performance of Nabucco last night--and my only sour note are the designs of the sets by John Napier. It's a wonder the artists didn't break their necks trying to manipulate all those steps. It's too bad Napier didn't immerse himself in Asyrian art for his inspiration. The Sets were much too high. I was sitting in the back of the orchestra under the box-seat overhang and there were at least 15 rows of expensive seats that could not see the top of the set. As to Guleghina--both critics had a valid point: Guleghina was both visually and vocally gorgeous---and even to my un-trained operatic ear, she did "crack" at some point--but it certainly didn't lessen her performance for me. The critic who criticized "Va, Pensiero" was probably half asleep---what a thrilling, sublime performance!--and Levine repeated it. I must get a "ballet" reference in here---while listening to the overture I couldn't help thinking--"What a wonderful substitute this music would be for Giselle"
  16. About those Wili dresses made of Cellophane....I suspect it might have been the Mordkin Ballet's production with Lucia Chase...(Ah-g-g- another "Giselle from Hell")
  17. About those Wili dresses made of Cellophane....I suspect it might have been the Mordkin Ballet's production with Lucia Chase...(Ah-g-g- another "Giselle from Hell")
  18. Eugene Berman's costumes were used for a 50's Ballet Theatre Giselle. I don't remember any "folk" costumes--but the whole production was in shades of blue and black...In the 2nd Act the Wilis long tarletans were shades of blues, going into black. What I do remember from that production was Nora Kaye as Giselle---Now, there was a "Giselle From Hell" [This message has been edited by atm711 (edited February 26, 2001).]
  19. Eugene Berman's costumes were used for a 50's Ballet Theatre Giselle. I don't remember any "folk" costumes--but the whole production was in shades of blue and black...In the 2nd Act the Wilis long tarletans were shades of blues, going into black. What I do remember from that production was Nora Kaye as Giselle---Now, there was a "Giselle From Hell" [This message has been edited by atm711 (edited February 26, 2001).]
  20. Erik Bruhn was once quoted as saying..."The perfect dancer has not yet been born". Not so, I say. How I miss his eloquence.
  21. I was very sorry to learn of Arova's passing.She was the classic "company ballerina"--always dependable, always good.But, as you said Alexandra, she was over-shadowed by Alonso and Markova.
  22. What makes a Prima Ballerina (or Premier Danseur)?--for me, it's always been that elusive quality called Artistry.
  23. I don't think Gore Vidal should be quoted as an authority on Nora Kaye. (He was once a part of my ballet class about the time of his second novel, and who could take anyone seriously who wore white tennis shorts to ballet class!) Nora Kaye had an exceptionally strong technique, which greatly enhanced her dramatic abilities. True, she was not of the classic line, but even her Giselle, Swan Lake and Black Swan PDD were worth seeing, but it was her strong technique that added so much to her Hagar---especially when she would spin out a series of swift pirouettes to relieve her tensions. (The impression was that she had spun out a dozen--not so, but that's how one felt.)
  24. I remember Harriet Toby, a corps member of the Denham Ballet Russe de Monte Carlo decades ago. She perished when the plane she was on took off from Orly Airport in Paris and crashed at the airport. The story at the time was that a flock of birds had got into the engines and caused them to malfunction. After all these years I remember her still in Concerto Barocco.
  25. I saw LeClercq dance many times and in all of her most noted roles. It may seem too trite to say she was "unique" but there is no other way to describe her. Her long, leggy, loose-in-the hips style was quite new. I never thought she had the traditional classic line, but her Symphony in C-2nd movement was very beautiful.
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