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atm711

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Everything posted by atm711

  1. There are two ballerinas who come to mind as glamorpusses--both on-stage and off-stage---Danilova and Toumanova--but I would never call them "stork-like creations".
  2. I chose Karsavina---one has only to look at those gorgeous photos of her in 'Carnaval', 'Giselle', or 'Petrouchka' to realize what you have missed. As to a non-option, I'd like to see Spessivtzeva.
  3. In commenting on the ballet, Beaumont said it was: "an ambitious attempt to revive the famous PDD from La Sylphide as it was danced by Taglioni....." In the 1945 Ballet Theatre revival, Lichine omitted the Sylphide and created a classical PDD for Alonso (according to Chujoy).
  4. I am all for changing the costumes and updating the look. I can't imagine seeing 'Concerto Barocco' in the original Eugene Berman designs. Fortunately, I never saw this production , but I believe they were short blue tutus. I did, however, see it in black leotards--correct me if I'm wrong, but I believe this is the first time Balanchine used the black/white look (a look I still prefer). So many of Balanchine ballets have benefited from costume changes, particularly '4 Temperaments'. The Seligman costumes were truly a disaster. And then there is 'Serenade'--a ballet that has many different costumes. The real poetry of the ballet finally came through with the current costuming. Anthony Dowell has some interesting thoughts on this subject in todays NYTimes. I am sure it is on one of the links.
  5. I have seen many dancers past their prime---Danilova, Markova, Dolin, Ulanova--and I am grateful for these memories. But, if I had seen them in their glory days I don't know if I would be so accomodating. Having seen Nureyev and Alonso in their prime, I felt they should have stopped performing. Since Alonso is at the top of my list for favorite Giselles, I cannot watch the cuban videos of her performances--but, I am sure others who only know of her through videos can detect some of what made her great. When Danilova was performing she had a lot of trouble with supported adagios. When her extended arm held on to her partner's hand, the whole arm wavered like a flag in a breeze. Also, Markova's technique was rather blurry. I had seen her many times as Taglioni (In Pas de Quatre), but it wasn't until I saw the youthful Alonso dance the same role, when I thought "So, that's what the choreography is". I say this, not to denigrade these fine artists, but making a case for their decision to have stuck around. I was enthralled by them.
  6. I have seen many dancers past their prime---Danilova, Markova, Dolin, Ulanova--and I am grateful for these memories. But, if I had seen them in their glory days I don't know if I would be so accomodating. Having seen Nureyev and Alonso in their prime, I felt they should have stopped performing. Since Alonso is at the top of my list for favorite Giselles, I cannot watch the cuban videos of her performances--but, I am sure others who only know of her through videos can detect some of what made her great. When Danilova was performing she had a lot of trouble with supported adagios. When her extended arm held on to her partner's hand, the whole arm wavered like a flag in a breeze. Also, Markova's technique was rather blurry. I had seen her many times as Taglioni (In Pas de Quatre), but it wasn't until I saw the youthful Alonso dance the same role, when I thought "So, that's what the choreography is". I say this, not to denigrade these fine artists, but making a case for their decision to have stuck around. I was enthralled by them.
  7. I saw the Ballet Theatre version with Markova and Dolin (Diana Adams was the princess!) and the Prince did very little dancing , and worst of all, he looked like one of Santa's helpers in the awful red and gold costume. Francisco Moncion was not noted for his technique, however there were many like him in ballet companies at the time. They were considered good partners with a dramatic flair, and looked good on the stage.
  8. I don't think I have ever booed a ballet performance--in fac t, I saw the 'Pied Piper' last year at ABT and did not Boo---I never realized I had that much restraint.
  9. I don't think I have ever booed a ballet performance--in fac t, I saw the 'Pied Piper' last year at ABT and did not Boo---I never realized I had that much restraint.
  10. I am about to order tickets for the Kirov at the Met this summer. On the days that I can make it, I have the following options: Bayadere---Zakarova/Zelensky or Gumerova/Semionov Swan Lake---Pavlenko/Korsuntsev or Nioradze/Korsuntsev I welcome your input.
  11. Dale--I did see 'Chopin Concerto' performed by the Denham BR, but at the time it paled in comparison to the Balanchine we were seeing.
  12. I chose Massine---oh to see 'The Good-Humored Ladies' and 'La Boutique Fantasque' --and while I'm at it--I'll take a couple from the 1930's--'Le Beau Danube' and 'Gaite Parisienne'. NO ONE can do ballets like these today. I've always been intrigued with the photos of 'Rouge et Noir' with Markova and Youskevitch, so I'll ask for that, too.--and one more request---performances by Danilova and Massine.
  13. Leigh---"Balustrade "was a few years before my time---I do remember the marvelous photos of Toumanova in the ballet. Richard Buckle has the following gossipy notes in his biography of Balanchine: "Toumanova was back in New York with the deBasil Company. One night, after she had danced 'Swan Lake' Balanchine brought Stravinsky and Tchelitchev to her dressing room. 'We want to give you a present--a diamond necklace,' he said. 'This was a figure of speech for a ballet to Stravinsky's Concerto in D for violin and orchestra. The dancers were to be only partly visible, like apparitions, dreams, insectlike or vegetable creatures appearing out of a dark night. "Will people understand?' asked Balanchine. "Balustrade opened on January 22, 1941, with the composer conducting. To judge from old and rather bad photographs, the lovely designs of the genius Tchelitchev, not for the first time, ruined a ballet. Brigitta (Zorina) thought so. In retrospect, she wondered if it might have been while watching 'Balustrade' that Balanchine first realized how much his ballets would benefit if costumes were reduced to a minimum. There were only three performances: presumably 'people,' including Hurok and Col. de Basil, had not 'understood'."
  14. Paris 1910--I still can't read enough about those twenty magical years.
  15. Paris 1910--I still can't read enough about those twenty magical years.
  16. Leigh Wichel writes: "His calves were muscular............It was not delicate or feminine...." I feel the same way when I see anorexic female dancers...
  17. Linsusanr--thanks for identifying Fernando Medina Gallego as the male dancer in "Corsaire". Do you know anything more about him? Does he perform elsewhere?
  18. I haven't seen the Trocoderos live for a good many years, but last night I caught up with them again via the Bravo Channel. It was a tape of a live performance given in Lyon. The two dancers who performed the Corsaire PDD were first rate. I was particularly impressed with the dancer who performed the male part. He had the necessary flamboyance and technique for the part and had a beautiful light jump--Poof!!--before you knew it he was straight up in the air in a split jete. Who is he? It was also the first time I saw "Go For Barocco" and I was smiling all through it and realizing how androgynous ballet has become. If they had played it without the laughs it would have looked like the real thing. I also thought it was amusing that the dancers did not deem it necessary to pad the bosom--they looked much more realistic that way!.
  19. I thought of a couple of alternatives: 1. list them in order of preference 2. if you were stranded on a desert island and could only see the ballets of three---who would you choose? Alas, the more alternatives, the worst it gets.
  20. Manhattnik--I liked your list. I saw Tudor's R&J danced by Markova and Kaye--but it is Hugh Laing's performance that has stayed with me. At the time, I found it too slow moving and I wasn't thrilled with Delius' music---However, having matured much since then I would love to see it again--but I don't know where they could replace Laing's brooding performance. As to Berman's "Giselle"---no! All those blues and blacks made for a very cold atmosphere--I like my "Giselle" to be bathed in the warmth of autumn colors.
  21. atm711

    Asylmuratova

    What a great article!. I have always suspected that Assylmuratova had it all--and this proves it.---great talent, beauty, and intelligence.
  22. Farrell Fan---it's everything you said it was---"Presumptuous, self-aggrandisement, childishness". I ran into something similar while teaching on the high school level. Most teachers called the boys by their last names---"Smith!", "Jones", and the girls were "Jane" or "Mary". I made it a habit to say "Mary Jones" or "Tom Smith".
  23. Farrell Fan---it's everything you said it was---"Presumptuous, self-aggrandisement, childishness". I ran into something similar while teaching on the high school level. Most teachers called the boys by their last names---"Smith!", "Jones", and the girls were "Jane" or "Mary". I made it a habit to say "Mary Jones" or "Tom Smith".
  24. I think I am more in the minority than you, dmdance! I voted for Copland. I did so, because I never tire of listening to his scores, and they are frequently played on the radio. I never find him trite. There is a clean, lyricism in his style and it always sounds new to me.
  25. I think I am more in the minority than you, dmdance! I voted for Copland. I did so, because I never tire of listening to his scores, and they are frequently played on the radio. I never find him trite. There is a clean, lyricism in his style and it always sounds new to me.
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