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felursus

Senior Member
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About felursus

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    Bronze Circle
  • Birthday July 14

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  1. The last act - to the Martinu score - was choreographed first. It was done when MacMillan was in Berlin, and somewhere there is a film of it (at the time), as a friend of mine was then in the corps of the Berlin Ballet and appears as an asylum "nurse". Interesting point to look for: there is a step where Anastasia holds her hands, one in front of the other, close to her face and moves the front hand back and forward rapidly. It's there because MacMillan asked Monica Parker, his notator, what movements she would have trouble notating, and her answer was "small movements in front of the face.
  2. A ballerina friend who is of Icelandic origin and typically very fair and blonde used to dye her hair dark in order to look "more like a ballerina". She said directors had suggested that she do this in order to "look better on stage." As far as "beauty" on stage, I do think that there are dancers with unfortunate faces - and there are those for whom no amount of makeup will help - although they may look perfectly good-looking offstage. I'm sure that there are those who dance beautifully and whose careers have been stunted or who have been shunted into character roles because of the way the
  3. I thought the bleeping spoiled the entire scene and ruined it for me. There is plenty of profanity, violence and nudity on TV. These days they put up warnings so that parents can decide whether or not they should allow their children to see a show. So why not on PBS? Because they are afraid of affending some congress person??? I want to know just what those congress people are watching at home.
  4. An article in the Sunday NY Times announces that the Graham Company will be reforming with performances in January at the Joyce Theater. http://www.nytimes.com/2002/09/02/arts/dan...todaysheadlines
  5. I haven't seen the third ad yet. I remember doing a double take when the first one - the one in which she didn't speak - came out. I shall look out for it.
  6. My husband, a member of the New York Choral Society, performed the Mahler 8th at Avery Fisher Hall a couple of years ago. AFH is the normal venue for the NY Philharmonic, which frequently performs choral works. The lights in the hall are usually dimmed - but not so much that one cannot follow the words in a programme. The same holds true of Carnegie Hall, which is frequently the venue for recitals by singers as well as for choral groups. I imagine, however, that people who need a lot of light in order to be able to read do have a problem with the lighting levels, but I think that if the li
  7. I would familiarise yourself with the music before going. It's fairly programmatic, so it's easy to follow what you can expect to be happening - once you know the 'libretto'. A complete recording should have an outline of the scenes/dances. I was "raised" on the Ashton version and loved the male sisters. I have very fond memories of them being played by Ashton and Helpman. I hope you enjoy the performance.
  8. Someone mentioned this topic somewhere else on this board, but I couldn't find it, so - has anyone else noticed the ad that has what appears to be wooden Nutcracker figurines hopping out of a cabinet (they are supposed to be Christmas decorations that have been stored away). They "dance" to Nutcracker music. There's even a ballerina in a pretty pink tutu (presumably the Sugar Plum Fairy). Then a door opens and a human says something like: "Just becaue we are having a (brand name) baked ham doesn't mean it's Christmas." The figurines fall out of their pirouettes and look disappointed. I th
  9. Well, the no clapping between movements 'protocol' is at least 110 years old. I was a late-life "accident": my father, if he were alive today, would be 111 years old. (Yes, my mother was considerably younger.) He was a violinist - trained at the Liszt Academy in Budapest. He told me that the no-applause convention was considered the correct thing when HE was a child. I know that when I go to concerts I find applause between movements disturbing to the flow. If people applauded between movements of, say, the Beethoven 9th, it would break up the performance, and then one couldn't apprecia
  10. Thanks for the description of the concert, Lolly. I wish I could have been there. The Proms have such a special atmosphere. When is the Last Night, by the way? If you could find out when the repeat broadcast is scheduled, I would appreciate it if you could let me know. I hope it will be at a time when I can listen in.
  11. Geiko Insurance. The point was that the mom had no car, was pretending to BE a car - down to stopping for a traffic signal, having a license plate on her rear, and having a horn in her hand which she tooted to attract her daughter's attention. Any kid would be embarrassed to have Mom show up at school like that. I think the point of the ad was that if you have Geiko insurance, you get a loaner car and don't have problems like that. I admit, I'm a Geiko ad fan - just LOVE that little gekko in most of them.
  12. Oooh - I'm so sorry I didn't see this until it was too late to listen in. Thanks to computers we can now listen in to British broadcasts, but alas, it's now 2 a.m in Britain as I write this. Sob!
  13. Someone asked about a dancer sometimes getting to do a solo and then being back with the corps. Many companies have contracts that specify what a dancer can/cannot be asked to do. One thing is that he/she can be asked to do a role that is normally assigned to someone either one rank below (not to mention the joy of being asked to do something normally assigned to someone one rank above) - so soloists at ABT can have a very, very busy life indeed. They can be asked to dance with the corps, and do soloist roles in the same performance, while if they are lucky also do principal roles. It can
  14. Frankly, I think that you get far more out of a parody if you are very familiar with the thing that is being parodied. While anybody can have fun at a Trock performance, I think that if you know the ballets, mannerisms, people and choreography that is being parodied you have a much better time. The last time I saw the Trocks I noticed that a segment of the audience laughed at things the majority failed to understand. A toast to all of the great "ballerinas" currently performing with the Trocks.
  15. Frankly, I think that you get far more out of a parody if you are very familiar with the thing that is being parodied. While anybody can have fun at a Trock performance, I think that if you know the ballets, mannerisms, people and choreography that is being parodied you have a much better time. The last time I saw the Trocks I noticed that a segment of the audience laughed at things the majority failed to understand. A toast to all of the great "ballerinas" currently performing with the Trocks.
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