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diane

Senior Member
  • Posts

    475
  • Joined

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  • Connection to/interest in ballet** (Please describe. Examples: fan, teacher, dancer, writer, avid balletgoer)
    former ballet dancer, now teacher, freelance choreographer, mama of two dancers
  • City**
    germany
  • State (US only)**, Country (Outside US only)**
    Germany and Austria

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  1. She apparently died in Perth on June 5th, 2021. RIP. https://michellepotter.org/tag/lucette-aldous
  2. Very sorry to read this. Her tours always sounded magical. RIP - and many condolences to family and friends. -d-
  3. Intriguing! I had never seen a production of Sleeping Beauty with those two pieces included. It is a long ballet even without them, and perhaps that is one reason they seem to be omitted more often than not? -d-
  4. Thanks! Really cool. And I greatly enjoyed the spoof, too. -d-
  5. pherank, I agree. Someone has to speak up, and forcefully. Too bad not many, many more are doing so. (i am pleased to see that some ARE coming out publicly to show some support) Another difficulty for dancers is that their careers are usually short (compared to other careers), and so by the time they have reached an age where they are confident enough to speak out forcefully, their careers are basically over. No one would listen. So, for Morgen to speak up now, even though she is not quite finished dancing professionally, is laudable. I think that most dancers just get really fed up and stop, then move on to other things. Then it is somewhat of a shock to see, twenty or so years later, that dancers are STILL up against the same sh*t dancers were up against when we were dancing. -sigh- -d-
  6. Absolutely. This has been my own experience, and that of my DDs (both professional dancers). I am glad that at least some things are _finally_ being discussed openly and that some dancers have felt able to speak up. There are so many wonderful dancers who do not "fit the mold". And, yes, the Age of Social Media makes it much more complicated. Of course, now with Covid, many companies are having a very hard time keeping dancers employed, making for harder times. Wishing all the dancers struggling out there all the best. -d-
  7. Yeah, pherank, it has been awhile. I am still here.... just getting more wrinkled and greyer. It is indeed very interesting how different cultures (try to) control how their languages grow and evolve. The German-speakers also seem to be very keen on keeping things orderly, though perhaps not quite to the extent the French council tries to do. (I did live in Greece for a few years quite some time ago, but I did not ever hear if they had such a council to decide about how to develop the language...) -d-
  8. Quote by pherank: "Oh to be a child and just sponge up language without trying to reason my way through it." Oh, my, yes! It appears that Greek has quite a phonetically logical pronunciation; especially compared to English. 😛 -d-
  9. @Anne: Yes, indeed; "durcheinander" connotes more chaos. -d-
  10. Sounds wonderful! So nice when something tlike this works out! (an attempt at translation: "...they will dance next to each other, one after the ohter, and sometimes mixed-up with each other...." ??) -d-
  11. Lovely! So glad you got to see this! (and got to film a little bit for us!) -d-
  12. diane

    Maria Kochetkova

    Wonderful, thanks for those! -d-
  13. diane

    Maria Kochetkova

    I love it that she does not succumb to the normalcy of wearing tight, high-heeled shoes. (not trying to slam those who really like wearing those shoes, but there is a sort of pressure on women to try to make their feet look as small as possible. 😛 ) -d-
  14. Thanks, pherank. Yep, things have not changed. (nor are they likely to...) One thought: There are cultural differences to criticism, and there are indeed some cultures/languages where what we - in the West and in English - would consider "harsh" statements/critiques, they are there considered quite "normal" and not at all harsh, just "direct". That is something which we have to get used to as the world becomes even more connected. (in dance this connection is happening faster than in many areas, I would say) So, yeah... perhaps if one is working for or with some people from Eastern Europe (and former Soviet countires, for example), one should take that into consideration. Not everything which is said can and should be taken the way we may see it at first. But, this is, I fear, digressing horribly, so I will now stop. -d-
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