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BryMar1995

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About BryMar1995

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  • Birthday 04/15/1951
  1. I need information, please. I am seeking dance festivals in Europe similar to Jacob's Pillow or American Dance Festival, where classes with quality teachers happen daily, and there are performances or workshops by professional artists in the evenings or weekends. I am especially interested in contemporary ballet/dance. I want to attend as an educator for faculty development. Can anyone suggest something worthwhile and interesting? Thanks! Rick McCullough
  2. I also really enjoyed Adrienne Sharp's "White Swan/Black Swan." Very engaging read and rang very true.
  3. Duncan Noble, ballet master, mentor, friend, and beloved teacher at North Carolina School of the Arts, passed away early this morning at Baptist Memorial Hospital in Winston-Salem, NC. There were complications after a recent heart surgery from which he was unable to recover. We loved him so much. He was a great and inspirational teacher. He was an elegant and generous man. Always dignified, his classes gave us strength and his teaching gave us a love for classicism. At the moment I do not know about any arrangements for funeral or memorial services but I will post news as I receive it.
  4. I think there's plenty of "technique" involved in a Fokine ballet (like Petrouchka, for example). It's just more subtle and less obvious than high legs, big jumps and multiple turns. Virtuoso techinique is only part of the palette a dance artist has to choose from in order to fulfill a role and move an audience. Rick
  5. I think there's plenty of "technique" involved in a Fokine ballet (like Petrouchka, for example). It's just more subtle and less obvious than high legs, big jumps and multiple turns. Virtuoso techinique is only part of the palette a dance artist has to choose from in order to fulfill a role and move an audience. Rick
  6. I always thought of Tudor as an American choreographer although his nationality was British. Perhaps it is because the core of his repertory was performed in the US, some of it made in the US using American themes, and performed by American dancers. I also feel that Balanchine's repertory was determined by the type of dancers he developed and choreographed upon. (Imagine if Balanchine had stayed in Paris after Ballet Russes, or South America!) When I danced in Holland at NDT I felt that Kylian's work was American because 50% of the company were Americans. Forsythe's work looks so right on
  7. I always thought of Tudor as an American choreographer although his nationality was British. Perhaps it is because the core of his repertory was performed in the US, some of it made in the US using American themes, and performed by American dancers. I also feel that Balanchine's repertory was determined by the type of dancers he developed and choreographed upon. (Imagine if Balanchine had stayed in Paris after Ballet Russes, or South America!) When I danced in Holland at NDT I felt that Kylian's work was American because 50% of the company were Americans. Forsythe's work looks so right on
  8. Kate, I meant that the dancers relish having new work created on them, especially for them. I know I did. The PBS special was a tough show to pull off, exhausting even, but I thought the company looked magnificent (with the exception of Wendy Whelan who, despite her strong dancing, looked thin to the point of being ill). A Diamond Project season would indeed be tiring, but perhaps no more that when Balanchine did his Ravel season, or any season when he was feeling prolific. I agree with Patricia and Leigh, that there are some choreographers whose style just may not fit well with NYCB. E
  9. Oh, let it live! The dancers seem to relish it, and there is a certain ballet public that wants to see what's new. Plus NYCB must continue to develop its repertory. What are the alternatives after all? NYCB is, in my opinion, a contemporary ballet company. While remaining firmly rooted in its superb technical base and exraordinary Balanchine repertory, it must still try to move forward. I thought Peter Martins explained that very convincingly on the Live from Lincoln Center broadcast. (What an exciting evening! And what a stupendous company!) The Diamond Project is a courageous and visio
  10. I remember seeing Gary Chryst as The Profiteer in The Green Table. At first I thought his feet were not flexible and his head too large. By the end of the performance I had forgotten all about his physique. His artistry was so powerful that I was compelled to see beyond the superficial issue of bodily proportions. He was such a master of his body, his focus, his musicality, his phrasing - all I remember was being so pulled into what he was doing and believing completely in his portrayal. It was his performance that night that taught me to look at dancers in a different way. The kind of i
  11. Yes, Leigh, it would be great to have some answers to those questions handy, because the art is under a lot of pressure, even under attack, as being anachronistic, stagnant and oppressive. Why do I have to constantly apologize for my art? It is what it is! We can also ask if those who work in classical ballet will be able to or even feel compelled to make ballet harmonius to the current paradigm (Politically Correct ballet, what would that be? Does anyone do it now?) Or is classic ballet unable to bend and flow with the times? What will the direction be for ballet in the 21st century? Evo
  12. Yes, Leigh, it would be great to have some answers to those questions handy, because the art is under a lot of pressure, even under attack, as being anachronistic, stagnant and oppressive. Why do I have to constantly apologize for my art? It is what it is! We can also ask if those who work in classical ballet will be able to or even feel compelled to make ballet harmonius to the current paradigm (Politically Correct ballet, what would that be? Does anyone do it now?) Or is classic ballet unable to bend and flow with the times? What will the direction be for ballet in the 21st century? Evo
  13. I adore the Balanchine and Robbins legacy, but I would hate NYCB to become simply a museum. The institution has too much vibrancy and talent and LIFE. The director of any company has a responsibility to the future as well as the past. Rick
  14. I adore the Balanchine and Robbins legacy, but I would hate NYCB to become simply a museum. The institution has too much vibrancy and talent and LIFE. The director of any company has a responsibility to the future as well as the past. Rick
  15. I thought that Homans overemphasized the Russian emigre influence in making NYCB what it was and is. If Balanchine was the heart of the company, then the dancers, nearly all American, were and are the blood, muscle and bones. To picture NYCB as a transplanted Russian company is a real stretch. I think it's important that the company try to find a new direction, and new repertory. That's as it should be. Life goes on. Martins seems intent on preserving and creating for the Balanchine dancer. But the Balanchine legacy is just too immense. The work is too great. I wonder if the Balanch
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