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Moonlily

Member
  • Content Count

    41
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About Moonlily

  • Rank
    Member

Registration Profile Information

  • Connection to/interest in ballet** (Please describe. Examples: fan, teacher, dancer, writer, avid balletgoer)
    fan, student
  • City**
    Heidelberg
  • State (US only)**, Country (Outside US only)**
    DEUTSCHLAND
  1. What it seems like is that the ideals of masculinity and partnering being presented here are being so truncated that dancers like Nureyev, Baryshnikov, and Ib Andersen would no longer make the grade. Again, you dance with your whole self and you don't have to work harder. If you're authentic, no one cares about your delivery. Look at the huge appeal of Nureyev in a less enlightened time than ours. (Or was it?) Good actors throw themselves so completely into their work, doing all sorts bits of fine tuning as they go along, that this self-consciousness of am I straight acting enough isn't even
  2. Quiggin, I don't believe that this is what people here are trying to say. Presumably, and from imagining oneself in a similar position and seeing different dancers or actors, it appears that acting like you are attracted to a person of a gender you are generally not attracted to (whether it is a straight person acting the part of a homosexual lover or a homosexual person acting the part of a straight lover) is more difficult. And that Marcelo Gomes succeeds to be convincing is evidence for him being a great actor for whom such things as gender of the partner don't matter in the moment of actin
  3. I agree with that too. A person in love is a person in love, no matter if the person is in love with a man or a woman. The feeling remains the same and this is what should be portrayed, regardless of who the partner is.
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