Jump to content
This Site Uses Cookies. If You Want to Disable Cookies, Please See Your Browser Documentation. ×

Tapfan

Senior Member
  • Content Count

    343
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Everything posted by Tapfan

  1. I knew about Polunin's tatoos, I just thought they were covered by a tight, red, shirt. Turns out it was Ball's tight, red, shirt. Btw, what's with those tight dancers shorts some of the guys wear? They make bootie shorts look demure. Not that I'm complaining. I see why male classical dancers frequently make good runway models. They are used to being on stage, are comfortable with their bodies and NOTHING they might be required to wear in a fashion show could possibly embarrass them. Not after they've worn skintight dancer's shorts or postage stamp-sized loincloths.
  2. Thanks meunier fan. Wow. Polunin and Ball look like they were separated at birth. Not only do they have striking facial similarities and the same floppy hair, but they have almost identical physical builds .
  3. Isn't that Sergei Polunin in the red top in this Royal ballet video from ?If it is him, what's he doing there after he'd quit the company and had briefly danced with others?
  4. That shot of the pained Richard Sherman was a priceless dig and I say that as someone who can't stand the Pats. That's cold Boston Ballet. Ice cold. But honestly, ballet companies have so many foreign-born members. it surprises me that they have as many American football fans as they do.
  5. But how can that be? They are Apollo's Angels! And football is such an "earthly" pursuit. Makes one believe that humans can truly be varied in their tastes and interests. Who'd have thunk it? Maybe Itzhak Perlman was being honest when he said he likes doo-wop music. ;) As to college football's elite roots, well, not in my lifetime. The quaint, rah-rah-sis-boom-bah and leather helmets of the old Harvard vs. Yale days is ancient history, as are the uniformly white teams. I live next to Texas and there's nothing that unites the classes, races and political factions like football. In fact,
  6. I like seeing that some ballet dancers actually know and/or care about something so plebeian as football.
  7. NYCB -- actually Ballet Society -- started out as the Mets with ABT decidedly the Yankees: ABT performed the full-length ballets that people other than Balanchine cult members knew and had seen from the Royal Ballet and Russian company visits and had all of the big money defectors, with casting prominently displayed in half-to-full-page ads in the NYT, while Balanchine (begrudgingly) eventually allowed casting to be posted in the lobby the week of and the dancers to be ranked and not displayed in alphabetical order. They even had a mainstream Hollywood movie, "The Turning Point," which was tar
  8. Exactly! It takes no character to root for the Yankees. But it takes real guts to be a Mets fan. Guts and a high tolerance for pain!
  9. I know it's the 75th anniversary of ABT but this documentary surprises me. Why bother? If there's one thing I've learned from NY dance writers, its that City Ballet is to the NYC dance scene, what The Yankees are to Major League Baseball. They are the only thing that matters. Ask anyone. ABT, DTH and everyone else might as well be performing in Podunk.
  10. Tapfan

    Misty Copeland

    Good for her. Will balletomanes object considering this isn't a a classical role that takes a role away from Stella and/or Sarah? And does Does Salstein have a chance at making principal? Or will his ambitions take him elsewhere? Or to another profession?
  11. Tapfan

    Misty Copeland

    To my eyes, Verdi's version is remarkably similar to Cojocaru's. They both seem to keep their torsos very very still. And Verdi is the rare dancer who radiates warmth both on and off stage.
  12. Tapfan

    Misty Copeland

    By that logic, only people who have direct knowledge of every artistic choice Shakespeare made are knowledgeable enough to stage his plays. Some of the most imaginative and some would say radical stagings of Shakespeare, happen in the land of his birth.
  13. Tapfan

    Misty Copeland

    Does it really matter what Balanchine would have thought? One of the marks of great art is that it is open to all types of interpretations that go beyond what even the creator might have imagined. Also, I find it interesting that one of the more "wooden" versions of this piece was danced by Cojocaru, who is known for her grace and musicality. But that evidently is how she saw the choreography. It all boils down what what you like.
  14. Tapfan

    Misty Copeland

    Don't forget . You folks know I'm not a fan of the cabal that is City Ballet. But I gotta give this woman props for pushing the envelope. While she's certainly graceful, you can tell that she's less interested in dancing like an angel than looking like frickin' Wonder Woman. I like that.
  15. Tapfan

    Misty Copeland

    I thought Copeland looked light and quick in Tchai Pas, and compared quite favorably to many famous ballerinas that have danced the role. That includes Darcy Bussell, Maria Nunez, Alina Somova, Svetlana Zakhorova and Alina Cojocaro. She even looked good when compared to McBride, who was admittedly past her prime in the video I saw. The annoyance Copeland generates seems to be so over-the top to some of us. If there's one thing I've discovered about ballet fans it's that people have their pets and prejudices the same as in any other art form.
  16. Tapfan

    Misty Copeland

    I thought the piece she danced from Balanchine's Tchaikovsky Pas de deux at the Kennedy Center Honors was lovely. And I swear that it looks like Patty McBride says "perfect" while she applauds the performance. If she doesn't seem to think Copeland is so out of her depth when dancing the great man's work, then perhaps Copeland's supposed limitations are more subjective than her detractors are willing to admit. I understand that people can hate Copeland for reason's that have nothing to do with race. But people can like her as well for reasons that transcend race. Some folks, who are actu
  17. Tapfan

    Fabrice Calmels

    I had the great good fortune to see the Joffrey's Nutcracker on December 27th. I found the production to be uniformly charming in every aspect, from the orchestra, to sets and costumes to child acrobat/dancers. But the most memorable thing about the production for me, was Fabrice Calmels as the Nutcracker Prince. The man moves his noble, seemingly endless legs with a grace that is not to be believed. He's a strong and attentive partner with the charisma of a rock star. When he's dancing, it's hard to watch anyone else. 'Scuse my fangirling, But I can't help it. I'm in love.
  18. Tapfan

    Misty Copeland

    I know that Lauren Anderson and Tai Jimenez both danced as principals in major U.S. companies. That's good, because what you wrote is that I didn't explain myself very well. I meant in a major international company. Heck, if one is counting all companies, then you have to include DTOH and other mostly black companies as companies where black women have the position of principle if not the actual rank.
  19. Tapfan

    Misty Copeland

    I would not attribute Misty being a trailblazer for many of the dancers you mentioned in the manner I believe you to mean. (Addison, DePrince, Rowser, Perry, etc.) While I am sure all the dancers mentioned admire Misty and are supportive of her successes, even applauding them and looking up to her. It is important not to assume that Misty has somehow helped these dancers land where they are or that she has made the way for them. They have done so at the same time Misty has been on her journey. Let's not lessen their individual successes by making those Misty's doing. It is also importa
  20. Tapfan

    Misty Copeland

    I know that Lauren Anderson and Tai Jimenez both danced as principals in major U.S. companies. But they're both retired. And Tai probably wouldn't have had her one year as principal at Boston Ballet if DTOH hadn't gone on hiatus. Yet unfortunately, no black woman has danced as principal with either of the so-called American Big Three - SFB, ABT or NYCB. And none of the most prestigeous international companies like The Royal Ballet, Parish Opera Ballet, The Bolshoi, The Mariinsky, The Royal Danish Ballet, The National Ballet of Canada or The Dutch National ballet has had a black woman in th
  21. Tapfan

    Misty Copeland

    Even if she never becomes a principal, she's been a trailblazer for people like Katelyn Addison, Michaela DePrince, Precious Adams, Jasmine Perry, Kimberly Braylock and Kayla Rowser. And god knows Precious Adams can dance Petipa.
  22. Tapfan

    Misty Copeland

    LOL! Misty may not be "famous" famous, but as Chris Rock would say, for aspirational black people, she's certainly "black famous!"
  23. Tapfan

    Misty Copeland

    I totally get that ballet is hard. I get that it's difficult even if you are a woman who is so white that you make the British royal family look like they are from the developing world. But let's be honest, Being white in ballet has never been something that put you at a disadvantage. Those of us who are impatient about its lack of diversity don't want unqualified black women to be promoted. That's tokenism at it's worst. But we're not buying the explanation that no black woman has ever been good enough for the principle ranks. Lack of acess to good training doesn't explain everything. Nor
  24. Tapfan

    Misty Copeland

    I agree Plisskin. The election of Obama doesn't mean everything is peachy. Things are better than they were but not as good as they should be. That includes attitudes in ballet. But on the list of things that are important to minority communities, racial representation in ballet that mirrors the American population is very close to the bottom of the list. As it should be.
  25. Tapfan

    Misty Copeland

    Thanks for the links. I know about these dancers but neither is in the senior ranks. It's hard to follow the careers of of people in the corps de ballet.
×
×
  • Create New...