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Monday, June 4

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Karel Cruz retires from Pacific Northwest Ballet.

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Boal noted that Cruz, despite having reached “kind of an old age for a male dancer,” didn’t necessarily need to make this season his last, but the two agreed that it was time. “He’s dancing beautifully, there really aren’t any weaknesses or wanings,” Boal said, “but that doesn’t mean it’s not time to retire. It’s nice to retire when you’re at the peak of your powers. Karel’s had an amazing run.”

 

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Reviews of the company's "Love and Ballet" program.

The Seattle Times

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It’s impossible to describe Wheeldon’s “Tide Harmonic” — composer Joby Talbot compares it to “a kind of water symphony” — without making it sound cheesy as hell. It is not. Dancers emulating aquatic life might be something you’d expect more from Burning Man enthusiasts than from PNB, but it was a jaunty delight to watch the opening night ensemble — Leta Biasucci, Elle Macy, Sarah Pasch, Sarah Ricard Orza, Price Suddarth, Miles Pertl, William Lin-Yee, and Joshua Grant — as they elegantly crabwalked across the stage, in a deep blue costuming and lighting scheme, to Talbot’s percussive, cataclysmic score.

seattlepi.com

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 ........The Year of the Rabbit just ends up dissipating the amazing energy that the other balletic pieces had put together.  Not to mention having some of the silliest choreography of the night, including the most obvious interpretation of an oxen that I have ever encountered in a ballet.  I half expected to see one of the dancers do the “bunny hop” across the otherwise minimalist stage.

 

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A review of  Ballett Zürich in 'Swan Lake' by Mark Pullinger for Bachtrack.

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Viktorina Kapitonova, shortly to leave the company, was a heartbreaking Odette. Initially, she coyly hid her face from Siegfried but was coaxed into response. In Ratmansky's choreography, arabesques are softer and her leg is kept lower, with no flashy six o'clock penchés. She has willowy arms and was incredibly light, her feet silently kissing the stage. In this version, Odette's counterpart, Odile, is no cold clinician; Kapitonova's Odile wore a beguiling, butter-wouldn't-melt smile and won Siegfried through charm, triumphantly clinching his knee in an arabesque penché at the climax of their pas de deux. Her swift feet dazzled in Odile's solo, with chaînés turns on demi-pointe. 

 

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