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Just now, CharlieH said:

She reminds me a lot of Xiomara Reyes in this role. Unforced charm, great technique & lovely lines, despite petite stature.

Yes indeed.

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Some points from the top of my head.

-Lovely production, with a strong vintage feeling. In a black and white picture it could look as something out of Ballet Russes de Montecarlo.

- Backdrops in a "chagallesque" style-(particularly act I)

- I do like the Karinska costumes. The short pink number for Swannilda might look odd to some, but I much prefer it to the huge bell shaped skirts I have seen I other productions. It looks very cute and straight from another ballet era, again..very Ballet Russe's de Montecarlo. 

- I quite didn't get the male costumes for the Mazurka. I'm sure they are probably very historically accurate, but still. Particularly the "pants"

- Wonderful doll sequences. If this was also Danilova's, kuddos to Mme. 

- Waltz of the Hours with the little girls was unexpected to me. And very charming. Quite a continuity from Balanchine of the Imperial stage tradition to do so and get the kids used to the stage.

- Prayer doesn't look the part. Where are the "praying" gestures...?

- Mixed feelings about the "War and Discord" divertissement. Overwhelming costumes-(I think this is the most I have seen in a Balanchine dancing role...even more than the Midsummer butterflies) and sort of repetitive.

- What are all those initials on the bells..? I think I might had seen AD for Danilova, LK for Lincoln K. and GB for Balanchine. Am I wrong..?

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12 minutes ago, cubanmiamiboy said:

Some points from the top of my head.

 

- Mixed feelings about the "War and Discord" divertissement. Overwhelming costumes-(I think this is the most I have seen in a Balanchine dancing role...even more than the Midsummer butterflies) and sort of repetitive.

- What are all those initials on the bells..? I think I might had seen AD for Danilova, LK for Lincoln K. and GB for Balanchine. Am I wrong..?

Agreed re. Discord and War.

I think you are right. At least Macaulay seems to think those are what they stand for.

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The sets and most costumes are by Rouben Ter-Arutunian, although Karinska is credited with 3-4 soloist costumes + those of the kids in A3.

The men’s corps costumes are based on traditional Hungarian outfits. Trust me, as a Hungarian-American. 😃 

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47 minutes ago, cubanmiamiboy said:

What are all those initials on the bells..? I think I might had seen AD for Danilova, LK for Lincoln K. and GB for Balanchine. Am I wrong..?

In an Instagram post on May 26, Alastair Macaulay explained the initials on each bell. I can't copy his text so check it out on IG.

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50 minutes ago, CharlieH said:

The sets and most costumes are by Rouben Ter-Arutunian, although Karinska is credited with 3-4 soloist costumes + those of the kids in A3.

The men’s corps costumes are based on traditional Hungarian outfits. Trust me, as a Hungarian-American. 😃 

You're right. I looked them up, and they look like this.

https://goo.gl/images/bMf9ys

 

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Posted (edited)

I did a repeat tonight on Bouder. Currently at intermezzo. She's one of the BEST Swannildas/Coppelias I have ever seen. Oh...how I would love now to see her Giselle...😔

Edited by cubanmiamiboy

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Bouder/Gordon were great indeed. Such a contrasting style compared to Peck/de Luz. Gordon doesn't have de Luz's mind boggling jumps and turns but he has boyish charm that's suitable to the character. I can't believe that Bouder had never danced Swanilda until this week. Her Swanilda was a little more animated than Peck's. I wish I could've seen Hyltin because she has totally different stage presence compared to Peck and Bouder.

I'm very looking forward to seeing tomorrow's triple bill and Laracey's debut in Concerto Barocco. 

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2 hours ago, cubanmiamiboy said:

I did a repeat tonight on Bouder. Currently at intermezzo. She's one of the BEST Swannildas/Coppelias I have ever seen. Oh...how I would love now to see her Giselle...😔

Agreed. I was sad when I had to miss out on Tiler Peck's Swanilda but now I'm glad I saw Bouder instead! I can't imagine anyone else could be more charming and funny than she was tonight. And those rock solid balances! 

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I went to the matinee yesterday and was pleasantly surprised by Pereira. I've never been blown away by her before, but in Coppelia her classical technique and stage presence were excellent... really great projection and command of the stage. I think this role was perfect for her. Huxley was also excellent in his technical ability and artistry... his traveling jumps and overall precision are insane, despite a couple of slightly awkward landings in the double tours. Swanilda's friends were mostly good and in sync; one pair seemed consistently "off" though. Loved Woodward, King, and Gerrity in the waltz/dawn/prayer solos. Overall was really impressed by the quality of staging and storytelling as well... unlike some other story ballets, the plot was easy to follow -- it almost felt like a silent film, especially in Act II.

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Posted (edited)

I attended yesterday’s matinee Erica Pereira and Anthony Huxley were superb. Ericas foot work was incredible she is so light on her feet. It was breathtaking. I agree with JuliaJ Erica’s technique and stage presence were excellent. Anthony was also exceptional his jumps were awesome. The entire cast was wonderful especially the kids from SAB. I am so happy i attended and was part of this audience who were treated to a great performance by 2 fabulous NYC Ballet dancers Erica and Anthony.

Edited by Dennis1954

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Posted (edited)

I also attended yesterday's matinee. I didn't know what to expect as I'd never seen Pereira perform. She has a lovely lightness and very, very expressive body. She blew me away! Gorgeous technique, musicality, acting: her mimes were crystal clear. My 6 year old granddaughter understood nearly all of what she said with her body; since we were in the 4th. ring and couldn't see faces, that was critical. She carried great energy from the very beginning to end, never showing any tiredness. The audience certainly appreciated Pereira. Often at matinees, especially involving so many adorable little ballet students, the female principal gets a shorter shrift than if she were performing at night. But this audience recognized Pereira's dancing as masterpiece and gave her a loud, long, thunderous applause with much cheering. She deserved it all. It was a triumph.

Edited by vagansmom

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How wonderful it was in a single weekend to see two beautifully-staged ballets set to scores by Leo Delibes!  Did this ever happen in nineteenth-century Paris?  It felt particularly wonderful since both ballets were coached by dancers who originated roles in them. I once took this as a matter of course, though I have a sinking suspicion that this may become rarer as time goes by.  (Just as at one time my mother thought nothing of seeing a Balanchine ballet supervised in every detail by George Balanchine).  As Suki Schorer took her bow during the curtain call of La Source at SAB, I felt (as ever) what a treasure she is. Coaches at City Ballet never appear on stage under any circumstances, but I felt Coppelia was extra-wonderful this year because of Patricia McBride.  So I salute the quadrumvirate for inviting her back.  At the same time, it was all so bitter-sweet. Why did we all have to wait almost 30 years for this to happen?  It seems like (artistic) murder!   Oh well. It is not like there is a “do-over” button in ballet or in real life.  But I hope the quadrumvirate continues their laudable open-door policy, and that the door does not slam shut under a future regime.

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Some more thoughts.

-Coppelia ought to be the most dancing-friendly ballet ever produced. It certainly epithomyzes like no other ballet the "musique dansante" concept. It is so full of beautiful melodies, one right after the other one. I haven't been able to take them out of my head.

- Dr. Coppelius has a very moving vulnerable moment when he kneels in front of his beloved doll, wishing to bring the life on her. 

- Coppelia has a #metoo moment while in Dr Coppelius arms, sitting on his lap. But she puts him in place right away ! 😎

- Ashley Bouder embodies my ideal ballet physique for a ballerina. Muscular legs, strong ankles and straight pointes. No hyperflexed tibial curvatures a la Copeland-( which takes the beauty of the chainee turns away) or mushy curved pointes/insteps, so prone to get off pointe at any difficulty. Bouder reminds me of the great Cuban dancers of the 80's. Wonderful "a terre" strong-( not willowy)- ballerinas who never ceased to dazzle with their dancing instead of their poses. BRAVA!

- Again... anybody on the "why" Prayer doesn't actually...pray in this version..?

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Posted (edited)
7 hours ago, cubanmiamiboy said:

- Again... anybody on the "why" Prayer doesn't actually...pray in this version..?

Perhaps it's meant to embody the spirit of prayer rather than simply demonstrating the act of putting one's palms together (which of course is not the only way to pray)? Just one possibility. I've only seen the Balanchine choreography once live and a few other times on video so would have to rewatch in order to offer any sort of stronger case. (And the Mozartiana preghiera would be an obvious counter-case.)

Edited by nanushka

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