Jump to content
dirac

Thursday, May 24

Recommended Posts

An analysis of Swanilda and her steps by Alastair Macaulay for The New York Times.

Quote

Around 1940, the choreographer George Balanchine told the critic Edwin Denby that all his ballets were based on this dance for Swanilda and her friends. Well, we can see why. “Coppélia” shows the same closed-open contrast that abounds in Balanchine ballets, notably in “Concerto Barocco” (1941):

 

Share this post


Link to post

A review of the National Ballet of Cuba by Andrew Meacham in The Tampa Bay Times.

Quote

The Ballet Nacional de Cuba performed Giselle, its signature ballet, on Wednesday at the David A. Straz Jr. Center for the Performing Arts. Fifty-four dancers charmed a packed house, culminating in about two hours an effort that took more than three years.

It was well worth the wait.

 

Share this post


Link to post

The Smuin Ballet performs in Mountain View this weekend.

Quote

Seiwert will soon be leaving her post as Smuin's choreographer-in-residence to become Sacramento Ballet's artistic director.

Share this post


Link to post

A report on the San Francisco Ballet School Student Showcase by Allan Ulrich in The San Francisco Chronicle.

Quote

Wednesday’s was a superior performance, which should only get better as the week progresses. All that rhythmically snappy John Philip Sousa music tempts dancers to anticipate the beat. But most of this team resisted the urge, while reveling in the sheer garishness of the Karinska costumes. Jasmine Jimison and Jennifer Watembach smartly led the first two “campaigns,” while the grand pas de deux united the genially strutting, high flying Jacob Seltzerand Leili Rackow, who danced well, but tried too hard to be adorable. Red, white and blue balloons subbed for the original, starry backdrop.

 

Share this post


Link to post

Allison DeBona and Rex Tilton are expecting a baby.

Quote

The two started dating in 2009 and were married in December 2016. Their romance was captured in the reality-TV show “Breaking Pointe,” which depicted DeBona as the troupe’s ambitious, sometimes tactless bad girl.

 

Share this post


Link to post

A review of New York City Ballet by Robert Gottlieb in The Observer.

Quote

Although seeing 18 Robbins pieces in a row can’t help revealing the thinness of his actual dance vocabulary, it also stuns us with the genius of his stagecraft and the variety and brilliance of his dramatic concepts. The talent was huge and the workmanship invariably superb. But because the vocabulary is thin and repetitive, many (perhaps most) of his works don’t repay frequent viewings. You can watch a great or even a good Balanchine ballet a score of times and always find more in it; once you’ve seen The Cage or Glass Pieces more than twice, there’s nothing left to discover, beyond individual interpretation. That’s why all but his most accomplished art falls short of being profound.

 

Share this post


Link to post
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×