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Tuesday, May 22

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A review of American Ballet Theatre' s gala by Alastair Macaulay in The New York Times.

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I’ve often resisted Mr. McGregor’s work in the past. I can’t say I succumb to it here. But he’s greatly helped by giving himself this sci-fi narrative. And he elicits devout, intelligent, arresting dancing from Ballet Theater’s performers. He has worked with Ms. Ferri at both the Royal Ballet and Fall for Dance at City Center. She has the raw truthfulness of Eleonora Duse or Anna Magnani; her mere presence is intensely affecting. One disappointment is her duet with Mr. Cornejo (to the music traditionally associated with the Chosen Maiden’s solo): She protests, but with a numbness bordering on tepidity.

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American Ballet Theatre held its Spring Gala Monday night, with a performance at the Metropolitan Opera House followed by dinner at the David H. Koch Theater.  Chaired by Sarah Arison, Emily and Len Blavatnik, and Sutton Stracke, and presented by Harry Winston, the evening raised nearly $2 million to support ABT and its educational outreach programs.

 

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The National Ballet of Cuba performs in Tampa this week.

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That’s why Wednesday’s performance of Giselle at the David A. Straz Jr. Center for the Performing Arts in Tampa matters so much. The effort to bring 54 members of the ballet here for the limited engagement took more than three years, coordination with other venues and cash from donors. The mood among organizers and local ballet lovers thrums at high voltage as the ballet prepares to take the stage for the first time since October 2003, when it also came to the Straz Center.

 

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New Orleans Ballet Theatre presents 'Giselle.'

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Jennifer Kronenberg, a former principal dancer with Miami City Ballet, dances the title role opposite Josue Justiz as Albrecht. Kronenberg’s husband, Carlos Miguel Guerra, is Hilarion, and Felicia McPhee is Myrtha, Queen of the Wilis.

 

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An appraisal of New York City Ballet's celebration of Jerome Robbins by Alastair Macaulay in The New York Times.

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I’m glad that City Ballet continues to program its vivid “See the Music” lecture-demonstrations, in which a conductor talks us through parts of a score, with examples played by the orchestra. This is invariably illuminating about the music, though it rarely addresses how the ballet answers it. But at the matinee on Saturday, when Andrew Litton, the company’s musical director, spoke about Ravel’s Piano Concerto in G itself, he also drew Robbins’s ballet “In G Major” (1975) into his discussion.

 

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A review of the Royal Ballet in "Elizabeth" by Jann Parry for DanceTabs.

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The physical similarity between the Yanowskys meant that it is possible to see the production as a fantasia on the Virgin Queen’s love life, rather than as a chronicle of her reign. Tuckett’s concern as director and choreographer was not her political scheming but an imaginative recreation of how she behaved physically, once free of the trappings of her court dress. Propaganda images of her show her stiffly encased in brocade, jewellery and ermine, with ever wider ruffs around her neck. What was she like in private, a monarch who enjoyed dancing?

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An interview with Michel Lavoie, who will perform in the Royal Winnipeg Ballet School Professional Division's production of "Coppelia."

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Lavoie, who has been a student in the professional division for the last seven years and who will now move on to RWB’s aspirant program, said his time with the famous ballet company has helped him evolve and develop as a both a person and dancer.

"It’s really taught me to work hard," Lavoie said, who attended Collège Louis-Riel in Grade 7 and 8. "In the end, this is what I want to do in life."

 

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A review of ABT's gala by Mary Cargill for danceviewtimes.

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Columbine and Harlequin had a grand pas de deux with delicate character touches; Harlequin was wearing a mask and carrying his wand (familiar to those who know the Balanchine version) and got to scamper around without any noble poses.  Whiteside was at his best, with his sparkling entrechats, tossing off little sideways jumps, and looking like he was having a wonderful time posing in his oversized hat.

Michael Popkin reviews the company in "Giselle."

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Having actually danced a restrained act one (where holding back her prodigious physical talents helped to build the portrait of the maiden with a weak heart), Osipova then upped the physical level of her dancing in the second act. But even here she was more restrained than in prior New York performances (for instance the last time she danced the role here with the Mikhailovsky Ballet)............ What instead stuck with you were myriad details: her layout in a shallow retiré during a pair of lyrical press lifts against the music, with Hallberg supporting her beautifully straight up and holding her still against the melody; Osipova’s beautifully long arms and hands, and the way she carried every dance motion out of her back as if rippling slowly in gestures to the tips of her fingers; her “sad feet” just touching the floor when Hallberg carried her skimming during promenades - and who knew that feet could be sad? A pair of tour jetés towards the end finished with a gesture of the hands that was nearly mime. So expressive had her dancing become that her technique was merely a means to dramatic freedom, and isn’t that what ballet dancing’s all about?

 

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