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"The great malaise of the Paris Opera Ballet" !!

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Just now, pherank said:

 

[There are something like 12 ballet masters at NYCB. The number of staff people in general is quite large.]

I was thinking of both the management staff at NYCB - the people "inside the building", as well as the Board of Directors.
The question has been: how many of these people are complicit in what essentially is a cover-up of bad behavior over many years?

The notion that Martins was the only person at NYCB who ever demonstrated emotionally or physically abusive behavior is incredibly unlikely. Or NYCB really is a magic kingdom. It's going to be the same situation at POB - there will be various incidents involving different people. Ideally, both the 'victims' and the 'accused' should receive immediate counseling (if it isn't also a legal matter). But the school and the company probably need a clearer set of rules for behavior at POB. And POB members need a clear process for dealing with "abusive" situations that arise.

What kind of counseling? Training in how to behave when in power? Good luck.   Heel? Be nice?

Talking to a dr?  Depends on the type of harassment and your belief in the dsm or pharmacology.

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Posted (edited)
11 minutes ago, Vs1 said:

But you had to go to school. She didn't have to go to ballet school, be a ballerina, or become an AD.

Isn't it possibly quite similar? Grad school can feel like a calling and a commitment, even if one in fact hates it — especially if one has innate talent. The same, I imagine, could be true of being a dancer.

Edited by nanushka
word choice

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Just now, nanushka said:

Isn't it possibly quite similar? Grad school can feel like a calling and a passion, even if one in fact hates it. The same, I imagine, could be true of being a dancer.

If that is what the poster meant. Some people go to grad school to meet job requirements. Some  go to delay work. Some go b/c of parental pressure. Some go because they love learning but hate the school room or process. Some go to learn because they need the skills.   Some go because they don't have to work if they get scholarships.  Some go because they don't know what else to do.    Maybe, for some, it is a calling.  But for a dancer who had no "calling or passion" and did something requiring incredible sacrifice, discipline, time, and work in school, who is still doing it after retirement, I have a bit of a hard time comprehending the meaning still.  Could a dancer have pressure or financial or other type of desperation? Is that passion?

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Posted (edited)
32 minutes ago, Vs1 said:

Maybe, for some, it is a calling.  But for a dancer who had no "calling or passion" and did something requiring incredible sacrifice, discipline, time, and work in school, who is still doing it after retirement, I have a bit of a hard time comprehending the meaning still. 

I can tell you from personal experience (and from knowing many others with a similar experience) that, for some, it is.

And my point was precisely that for her it may indeed have been a "calling or passion" (though before you posted, but apparently after you quoted me, I changed "passion" to "commitment," which was more precisely what I meant), but that she could still in fact hate it. And I believe that's along the lines of what the original poster was suggesting as well — though I may be wrong about that, of course.

All that said, I have no particular thought as to whether Dupont does indeed hate ballet. I just think it's not at all impossible that she could.

Edited by nanushka

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17 minutes ago, Vs1 said:

What kind of counseling? Training in how to behave when in power? Good luck.   Heel? Be nice?

Talking to a dr?  Depends on the type of harassment and your belief in the dsm or pharmacology.

"Luck" would have absolutely nothing to do with it. There's no time like the present for POB to implement a much improved human resources department and create rules and procedures and actually enforce them. In the part of the world that I live in, these things have existed for decades, both in civil service, union jobs, and in private industry. But private industry is notorious for cutting corners and not providing adequate assistance to employees and management. That's when everything comes down to people "doing the right thing", and guess what? People don't always do the right thing. That's why companies with real human resources departments that offer seminars and training for employees and management, (some of those trainings being mandatory), tend to be the best places to work, by far. I'm well aware that there are cultures in which 'employees' are little better than slaves in terms of their rights at work, and the work environment is often unhealthy or even lethal. POB is not located in one of those cultures - they don't have any excuses, and neither does NYCB.

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2 hours ago, pherank said:

"Luck" would have absolutely nothing to do with it. There's no time like the present for POB to implement a much improved human resources department and create rules and procedures and actually enforce them. In the part of the world that I live in, these things have existed for decades, both in civil service, union jobs, and in private industry. But private industry is notorious for cutting corners and not providing adequate assistance to employees and management. That's when everything comes down to people "doing the right thing", and guess what? People don't always do the right thing. That's why companies with real human resources departments that offer seminars and training for employees and management, (some of those trainings being mandatory), tend to be the best places to work, by far. I'm well aware that there are cultures in which 'employees' are little better than slaves in terms of their rights at work, and the work environment is often unhealthy or even lethal. POB is not located in one of those cultures - they don't have any excuses, and neither does NYCB.

You mean those big companies that hire people for training at no pay, and then pay two dollars an hour, make you work on call with no ability to get a second job, force you to get food stamps, and you work until your earnings eat into the next level boss's bonus, so you get fired and lose your book of business?  Which are unlike and better than small family owned businesses that cause one to suffer through nepotism?

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Goodness, this thread has strayed from the original topic!  

If not Dupont, then who?  And who would want it???

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11 hours ago, Vs1 said:

But for a dancer who had no "calling or passion" and did something requiring incredible sacrifice, discipline, time, and work in school, who is still doing it after retirement, I have a bit of a hard time comprehending the meaning still.

It can also be inertia, particularly if offers and incentives keep coming your way. Is it so hard to believe that an innately talented person, who sails through POBS exams, then a POB audition, then the promotion competitions, may assume that she has found her calling and not stop to consider an alternative? And then reach her mid-40s and realize that she doesn't know how to do anything else?

Some years ago there was discussion on the board about a report which found that most ex-dancers ended up teaching dance, not because they wanted to do it, but because it was the only marketable skill they had.

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Florimond Lorieux has announced on his Instagram feed that he's returning to the Paris Opera Ballet after two years as a soloist at Boston Ballet. He can't be too worried about the malaise!

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Posted (edited)

Dupont must want him but  I can't understand why he would leave Boston where he dances principal roles to go back to POB where he doesn't, so, either Aurelie promised something or he is home-sick of the contemporary repertoire that no other company in the world has........or simply realized Boston is not enough for him to give up a lifetime contract. 

Edited by Gnossie

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16 minutes ago, Gnossie said:

Dupont must want him but  I can't understand why he would leave Boston where he dances principal roles to go back to POB where he doesn't, so, either Aurelie promised something or he is home-sick of the contemporary repertoire that no other company in the world has........or simply realized Boston is not enough for him to give up a lifetime contract. 

A great job in Boston or a not bad job (with lifetime contract) in Paris? I know which I'd pick. (Of course, I'm not a dancer.)

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Yes, lifetime contract + POB lacks male soloists and plenty of needs next year (Cinderella and Lady of the Camellias, both  in December, Swan Lake (2 Etoile roles), Robbins bill, etc. ) Lorieux  comes back with  experience so he may be needed…

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10 hours ago, Gnossie said:

 I can't understand why he would leave Boston where he dances principal roles to go back to POB where he doesn't, so, either Aurelie promised something or he is home-sick of the contemporary repertoire

Might he just simply be homesick?

I'm off to Paris in a couple of weeks and have actually booked a ticket for a very unpromising programme, partly out of nostalgia for a company I used to love and partly to catch sight of the younger dancers whose careers I've completely missed, I fear there will be little point in reporting back.

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7 hours ago, Mashinka said:

Might he just simply be homesick?

I'm off to Paris in a couple of weeks and have actually booked a ticket for a very unpromising programme, partly out of nostalgia for a company I used to love and partly to catch sight of the younger dancers whose careers I've completely missed, I fear there will be little point in reporting back.

Oh, there's always something to say about a trip to Paris!

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Seems like a lot of movement in Boston too

does that really seem unusual

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I've followed Florimond Lorieux's Instagram feed since he decamped from the Paris Opera Ballet to the Boston Ballet. My general takeway from his postings has been that he has had some 'up' moments in Boston and some 'down' moments there. Curiously, some of his most enthusiastic postings about life in the US were were in regard to his visits to NYC (i.e. taking class with Willy Burman). That being said, his return to POB may be nothing more than homesickness for Paris and sensing a bit of opportunity within the current ranks of male dancers.

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Boston can be a tough place if you don’t ready have a social network. 

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There is lately nothing good to say about Paris, or France in general, there has just been an attack at the Place de l’Opera. I pray for Mashinka to have a safe trip. 

 

On 5/11/2018 at 7:03 AM, Mashinka said:

'm off to Paris in a couple of weeks and have actually booked a ticket for a very unpromising programme, partly out of nostalgia for a company I used to love and partly to catch sight of the younger dancers whose careers I've completely missed, I fear there will be little point in reporting back.

The best thing this season (in my opinion) was the De Keersmaeker triple bill that ended just today. But please DO report on your visit.  

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These terrorist incidents are rife in London too sadly and we've been told by our mayor that we must learn to live with them.  I'm away primarily for some opera (Jarousky in Gluck's Orfeo) and then on to Naples for a performance at San Carlo. 

Perhaps the POB should have heeded RB audience reaction to Shechter,  because when they unwisely revived the piece he did for the company it was programmed last and the audience walked out in droves.  I'm afraid I'm not a fan of Crystal Pite either, the fact she's using Vivaldi's Four Seasons brings to mind memories of Caligula - and being put on hold when calling UK utilities companies.  On the other hand the casting is now up and there is a good spread of performers, on this occasion I'm definitely there for the dancers and not the ballets.

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