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2018-19 season: Pennsylvania Ballet

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A postcard just went out to previous ticket buyers, donors, and subscribers reporting that the 2018-19 season will be announced in "a few weeks." But it also says that the season will open in October with MacMillan's Romeo and Juliet.

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No more Cranko?  That's a shame, their performance of Cranko's R&J used to send chills down my spine.

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How many companies in the US do the MacMillan?

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The complete season is now on their web site: http://paballet.org/2018-2019-season/

RENEW YOUR SUBSCRIPTION

Romeo and Juliet

October 11 – 21
Sir Kenneth Macmillan’s emotional choreography pairs with Prokofiev’s famous score to portray this moving tale of star-crossed lovers that is sure to stay with you long after you leave the Academy of Music.

Petite Mort
World Premiere by Andrea Miller
World Premiere by Russell Ducker

November 8 – 11
Set to music by Mozart, Jiří Kylián’s Petite Mort features six men, six women, and six fencing foils, which combine to explore ideas of aggression, sexuality, energy and vulnerability. The program will also include world premieres from award-winning choreographer and Pennsylvania Ballet company dancer Russell Ducker and Gallim Dance founder and artistic director Andrea Miller, who currently Artist in Residence at the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

George Balanchine’s The Nutcracker®

December 7 – 30
What would the holidays be without George Balanchine’s The Nutcracker®? Whether it’s your first or thirty-first time seeing Pennsylvania Ballet’s production of the classic, watching the timeless story brought to life is always a delight.

Giselle
March 7 – 17
One of ballet’s oldest and most continually-performed works, Giselle tells the story of a young woman whose love triumphs over vengeance and lasts even beyond death.

Apollo
The Cage
World Premiere by Matthew Neenan
Stravinsky Violin Concerto

April 4 – 7
We celebrate the work of famed Russian-born composer Igor Stravinsky with four works set to his music: George Balanchine’s Apollo and Stravinsky Violin Concerto, Jerome Robbins’ The Cage (company premiere), and a world premiere by our Choreographer in Residence, Matthew Neenan.

DGV (Danse à grande vitesse)
World Premiere by Jorma Elo
Glass Pieces

May 9 – 12
Christopher Wheeldon’s DGV: Danse à Grand Vitesse is set to Michael Nyman’s MGV (Musique à Grande Vitesse), which was composed to commemorate the French train à grand vitesse, and conveys the sense of movement and momentum of the high-speed train. Internationally recognized choreographer Jorma Elo will present an all new-ballet for us, and the program will conclude with the company premiere Jerome Robbins’ Glass Pieces, set to the music of composer Philip Glass.

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Besides Nutcracker, one program with Balanchine.  

 

Which I suppose is a good thing, since there really aren't many Balanchine-trained dancers left in the company.  

 

 

 

 

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8 minutes ago, canbelto said:

It's really becoming mini-ABT.

But with a better website! ;)

This might be a good strategy in terms of box office, assuming there isn't a great deal of overlap between NYC and Philly audiences. (I know some balletomanes may trek back and forth between the cities, but I've always been under the impression that NYC and Philly are somewhat distinct markets, despite their relative geographic proximity.) 

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Hmm I don't know ... their full-length productions have not sold well this season. I have gotten email offers about discounts. Their upcoming Swan Lake (usually a cash cow in whatever form) has plenty of seats left.

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1 hour ago, canbelto said:

Hmm I don't know ... their full-length productions have not sold well this season. I have gotten email offers about discounts. Their upcoming Swan Lake (usually a cash cow in whatever form) has plenty of seats left.

I'm curious why that would be. And the mixed programs have been selling better? In most markets, one so often hears that full lengths sell better than mixed programs. Why might Philly be different? Could it be an adjustment period? Dissatisfaction among the general public with the direction of the company? Other reasons? Just curious, since it doesn't seem to fit (what one thinks of as) the norm.

Edited by nanushka

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57 minutes ago, nanushka said:

I'm curious why that would be. And the mixed programs have been selling better? In most markets, one so often hears that full lengths sell better than mixed programs. Why might Philly be different? Could it be an adjustment period? Dissatisfaction among the general public with the direction of the company? Other reasons? Just curious, since it doesn't seem to fit (what one thinks of as) the norm.

It's a rather small company and I think many people think that they can go to NY if they want to see "the classics." PA Ballet is still a rather small regional company and I don't think the average ballet goer really knows, say, Sterling Baca or Mayara Piniero or the other dancers Angel Corella has been pushing heavily. 

I'm sure the company's heavy turnover the past couple of years hasn't helped. 

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I don't recall Swan Lake selling poorly back in the Christopher d'Amboise days...  is this low turn-out something new?  Maybe that poster image isn't helping much...

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21 hours ago, canbelto said:

Hmm I don't know ... their full-length productions have not sold well this season. I have gotten email offers about discounts. Their upcoming Swan Lake (usually a cash cow in whatever form) has plenty of seats left.

It will be interesting to see how Jewels sells.  If the Philly crowd is still more pro-Balanchine than full length, I would expect to see Jewels sell better.

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