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dirac

Friday, July 21

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Ballet West invites Cuban dancers and instructors to participate in the company's summer intensive.

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The exchange began when relations were restored between the U.S. and Cuba during the administration of President Barack Obama, and included an invitation extended last year by Ballet Nacional de Cuba to Ballet West for the International Ballet Festival of Havana. The performance was a hit, and despite new restrictions under the current administration of President Donald Trump, the two ballet companies seem determined to continue their conversation through the universal language of dance.

 

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The Edward Gorey House's current exhibit features "Edward Gorey's Cabinet of Curiosities."

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This year's theme centers on Wunderkammers, the 15th-century tradition of galleries, a predecessor to our modern-day museums. Emily said that the staff didn't know if Gorey had amassed goods for intellectual reasons or because of pack-rat urges. Or maybe he was just feeling expansive: After squishing into a tiny Manhattan apartment for years, Gorey finally had the space for his 25,000 books, rocks, glass vessels, tarot cards and kitchen tools, among other belongings.

 

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A review of the Lincoln Center's multi-company "Jewels" by Alastair Macaulay in The New York Times.

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You can see how the Bolshoi and City Ballet styles are related: long phrases, luxurious texture, expansive physicality, calmly off-balance emphasis. The Paris style, marvelously chic, proves far less right for Balanchine, above all in the women’s clipped phrasing and anti-musical dynamics (dwelling archly on transitions, flicking lightly through important linear points). “Emeralds,” although Gallic, does not suggest Paris anyway: It seems to belong in some Fontainebleau-like forest glade, whereas these dancers emanate big-city polish.

 

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Tips on gluten-free baking by NYCB corps member Jenelle Manzi.

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But she missed baking. Then, she realized that she didn't have to stop—she just needed to adapt her old recipes. "There's something so satisfying about figuring out how to make recipes I used to love," she says. Now, Manzi usually keeps the dough of a favorite gluten-free treat, like matcha ganache bars or grain-free cacao brownies, ready in the fridge so she can whip something up quickly for a party or rehearsal.

 

 

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Unity Phelan teaches at Princeton Ballet School's summer intensive.

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"It’s fun to give back," Phelan said of returning home to teach. "I feel like I got so much from this organization and it’s really fun to come back and remember where I stood at barre and remember where I kind of grew up. I’ve been here since I was 5, I was here from 5 to 14, so it’s a lot of my life spent in these halls and these studios. I love getting to teach and, all the kids are so excited and eager to dance, so it’s fun to see that."

 

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A review of "Jewels" at Lincoln Center by Apollinaire Scherr in The Financial Times.

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New York City Ballet’s Rubies, with Megan Fairchild especially expansive and erotic, returned us to Balanchine. Between melancholy, courtly bookends, this aberrant middle presents the choreographer at his most insouciant and vulgar. Legs splay and the torso dilates. But what lights up Rubies is a Balanchine constant whatever the mood or the vernacular he’s drawing on: the pelvis. That powerful engine turns legs into weapons, with arms and feet punctuating each salvo. The effect is electric, as it was here, with the relation of soloist to corps thrillingly close to chaos.

 

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A review of the Hamburg Ballet in "Anna Karenina" by Ilona Landgraf in her blog, "Landgraf on Dance."

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Neumeier subtitled his ballet “inspired by Leo Tolstoy”, giving himself a great deal of creative freedom. He chose first to take the liberty of placing the story in the present day: his Alexei Karenin is no aristocratic senior statesman, but rather a successful Russian politician of our time. Music by Peter Tchaikovsky accompanies external events, serving as an acoustic connection to Tolstoy and to the 19th century. Emotional, internal moments and conflicts are set to music by Alfred Schnittke. Songs by Cat Stevens / Yusuf Islam characterize the life and world of the landowner, Levin.

 

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