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11 hours ago, Natalia said:

My first thought was "Hooters Ballet Theatre." Let's see a basic professional-ballet look. I thought, for a moment, that I had received a flyer for my local college's amateur year-end workshop.

Laughed out loud when I read your comment, Natalia.  Canbelto, the photo is Misty and James Whiteside.  

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On ‎6‎/‎28‎/‎2017 at 11:19 AM, fondoffouettes said:

 

 

 

I can't believe they're bringing back Millepied's dreadful Daphnis and Chloe. I'm happy to see the return of Other Dances (I remember Murphy and Hallberg being delightful in it, during that weird fall season at Avery Fisher Hall). Symphonic Variations is another welcome return; we'll see if the company looks more comfortable in it this time around. 

I saw Murphy and Gomes dance this at the Fisher Center at Bard several years ago and they were wonderful.  Interestingly, the next summer at SPAC, NYCB danced it and I thought it looked so different.   

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5 minutes ago, KarenAG said:

I saw Murphy and Gomes dance this at the Fisher Center at Bard several years ago and they were wonderful.  Interestingly, the next summer at SPAC, NYCB danced it and I thought it looked so different.   

I'm almost certain it was Tiler Peck, but I don't know who the male was.  But that would explain, in part, my feeling that I wasn't seeing (at SPAC) the ballet I had seen at Bard the previous fall.  They're such strong and talented, but very different, dancers.

Edited by KarenAG
clarification

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I've always thought of Other Dances as a short dancer ballet. Maybe because Makarova and Baryshnikov were both short dancers, and then in NYCB the casting is still short dancers (Tiler Peck, Joaquin de Luz, Megan Fairchild, Gonzalo Garcia).

 

 

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32 minutes ago, canbelto said:

I've always thought of Other Dances as a short dancer ballet.

 

This question definitely intersects with the one sandik just recently posted on the "Lincoln Center Festival 2017" thread (applying that question to choreographers other than Balanchine, obvs).

Edited by nanushka

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5 hours ago, nanushka said:

 

This question definitely intersects with the one sandik just recently posted on the "Lincoln Center Festival 2017" thread (applying that question to choreographers other than Balanchine, obvs).

 

Diving in -- this example seems even more complex to me, since the work was made so specifically for those two dancers, and the penumbra of their histories seems to me to imbue the work.  I think other dancers could dance Other Dances (what a fun sentence that is), but it will indeed be another dance.

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25 minutes ago, sandik said:

 I think other dancers could dance Other Dances (what a fun sentence that is), but it will indeed be another dance.

 

Sort of off topic but -- Kirkland was ravishing in Other Dances. I saw her give two performances in D.C. that were unbelievable--the second one in particular. I daresay the ballet was different that it was when Makarova danced it, but also genuinely extraordinary.  I remember the audience going into a kind of collective swoon when Kirkland began her first variation. 

 

When I saw Kirkland dance Other Dances in NY, probably a season or two later  (I can't remember exactly)--she was lovely, but not as effective as in those D.C. performances. In particular she barely seemed to project -- and I was sitting very close.

 

I can't know but suspect her various problems were catching up with her by the time of the NY performances. But those D.C. performances count among the most special ballet performances I've seen.

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5 minutes ago, Drew said:

I can't know but suspect her various problems were catching up with her by the time of the NY performances. But those D.C. performances count among the most special ballet performances I've seen.

 

And how lovely for you that you had that experience -- many thanks for bringing it forward here.

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On ‎7‎/‎24‎/‎2017 at 1:09 AM, Drew said:

 

Sort of off topic but -- Kirkland was ravishing in Other Dances. I saw her give two performances in D.C. that were unbelievable--the second one in particular. I daresay the ballet was different that it was when Makarova danced it, but also genuinely extraordinary.  I remember the audience going into a kind of collective swoon when Kirkland began her first variation. 

 

When I saw Kirkland dance Other Dances in NY, probably a season or two later  (I can't remember exactly)--she was lovely, but not as effective as in those D.C. performances. In particular she barely seemed to project -- and I was sitting very close.

 

I can't know but suspect her various problems were catching up with her by the time of the NY performances. But those D.C. performances count among the most special ballet performances I've seen.

There's a clip on youtube of Kirkland and Baryshnikov in selections from Other Dances.  Although she's very different from Makarova she seems to be channeling Makarova in one of the solos.  Also recently posted on youtube  is also a fascinating comparison of  the ballerina's second variation that compares Makarova with Kirkland, Arbo and several others. 

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52 minutes ago, Marta said:

There's a clip on youtube of Kirkland and Baryshnikov in selections from Other Dances.  Although she's very different from Makarova she seems to be channeling Makarova in one of the solos.  Also recently posted on youtube  is also a fascinating comparison of  the ballerina's second variation that compares Makarova with Kirkland, Arbo and several others. 

 

I have seen the first one you mention though not the second--thank you.

 

Unfortunately the clip of excerpts is missing the solo I remember--where the movement seemed to flow through her body like a force of nature--it was as if she became a rippling stream. Sounds absurd, but that's what it looked like to me!

 

Just a side note about youtube and video: I live far from the centers of the ballet world and depend on youtube for much of my ballet watching these days--I have even formed some provisional opinions, likes and dislikes, based on youtube videos. But I find I enjoy watching video least with dancers I saw live, especially if I loved their dancing. I only occasionally watch Kirkland OR Makarova on video--Farrell also only now and then! Of course, I'm happy to have any and all records of their dancing, but even the best video always fall short of capturing what it was like to see them in the theater.

 

I'd also be surprised if Makarova and Kirkland didn't slightly vary their interpretations of Robbins' choreography from night to night.  I saw Kirkland dance Other Dances in D.C. twice within a week and they were not the exact same performance. As I mentioned above, the New York performance I saw her give was very different again (and not as stunning though rather poetic and introspective).

 

These are all things I try to remember when I'm forming opinions from video of dancers I've never seen live. Though at least the quality of the picture is a lot better for dancers who emerged in this century.

 

Edited by Drew

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4 hours ago, Drew said:

 

I have seen the first one you mention though not the second--thank you.

 

Unfortunately the clip of excerpts is missing the solo I remember--where the movement seemed to flow through her body like a force of nature--it was as if she became a rippling stream. Sounds absurd, but that's what it looked like to me!

 

Just a side note about youtube and video: I live far from the centers of the ballet world and depend on youtube for much of my ballet watching these days--I have even formed some provisional opinions, likes and dislikes, based on youtube videos. But I find I enjoy watching video least with dancers I saw live, especially if I loved their dancing. I only occasionally watch Kirkland OR Makarova on video--Farrell also only now and then! Of course, I'm happy to have any and all records of their dancing, but even the best video always fall short of capturing what it was like to see them in the theater.

 

I'd also be surprised if Makarova and Kirkland didn't slightly vary their interpretations of Robbins' choreography from night to night.  I saw Kirkland dance Other Dances in D.C. twice within a week and they were not the exact same performance. As I mentioned above, the New York performance I saw her give was very different again (and not as stunning though rather poetic and introspective).

 

These are all things I try to remember when I'm forming opinions from video of dancers I've never seen live. Though at least the quality of the picture is a lot better for dancers who emerged in this century.

 

I agree that flat videos are a pale imitation of the visceral theater experience. Makarova, Farrell and Kirkland are my favorites. None of them have  a huge presence on youtube, although lately I'm seeing more of Makarova in the USSR. Unfortunately  I never saw Kirkland live.  I'm smiling at this: Though at least the quality of the picture is a lot better for dancers who emerged in this century.

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Casting released:

 

CASTING ANNOUNCED FOR

AMERICAN BALLET THEATRE’S 2017 FALL SEASON

AT DAVID H. KOCH THEATER

Casting for American Ballet Theatre’s 2017 Fall Season at the David H. Koch Theater
was announced today by Artistic Director Kevin McKenzie.
American Ballet Theatre opens its Fall season on Wednesday, October 18 at
6:30 P.M. with a special opening night Gala performance highlighted by the World Premiere of a
new work by Artist in Residence Alexei Ratmansky. The work for twelve dancers will be led by
Isabella Boylston and Alban Lendorf at the World Premiere. Christine Shevchenko and Calvin
Royal III will debut in the roles at the matinee on Saturday, October 21. Ratmansky’s new work
is set to new music Bukovinian Songs (24 Preludes for Piano) by Leonid Desyatnikov, performed
live by guest soloist Alexey Goribol.
The Opening Night Gala will also feature the World Premiere of a new work by Jessica
Lang performed by ABT apprentices, the ABT Studio Company and students from the upper
level of the ABT Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis School. Christopher Wheeldon’s Thirteen
Diversions will round out the opening night program with Sarah Lane, Misty Copeland, Stella
Abrera, Skylar Brandt, Joseph Gorak, Gray Davis, Thomas Forster and Zhiyao Zhang in the
leading roles.
American Ballet Theatre will give the season’s first performance of Jessica Lang’s Her
Notes on Thursday evening, October 19 danced by Gillian Murphy, Misty Copeland, Devon
Teuscher, Stephanie Williams, Skylar Brandt, Cassandra Trenary, Thomas Forster, Gabe Stone
Shayer, Cory Stearns and Blaine Hoven. The October 19 performance will mark debuts by
Forster and Shayer in the ballet. On Friday evening, October 20, Luciana Paris and Catherine
Hurlin will dance the ballet for the first time, alongside Stella Abrera, Christine Shevchenko,
Stephanie Williams, Sarah Lane, James Whiteside, Arron Scott, Alexandre Hammoudi and
Calvin Royal III. Set to music by Fanny Mendelssohn, with costumes by Bradon McDonald,
scenery by Lang and lighting design by Nicole Pearce, Her Notes received its World Premiere

on October 20, 2016 at the Koch Theater in New York City.

 

Misty Copeland, Christine Shevchenko, Luciana Paris, Arron Scott, Calvin Royal III and
Joseph Gorak will dance the season’s first performance of Frederick Ashton’s Symphonic
Variations on Thursday evening, October 19, with Scott and Gorak making debuts. Symphonic
Variations is set to music by César Franck, with costumes by Sophie Fedorovitch and lighting by
Michael Somes. A plotless ballet for six dancers, Symphonic Variations was given its World
Premiere by the Sadler’s Wells Ballet in London on April 24, 1946. It was first performed by
American Ballet Theatre at the Civic Opera House in Chicago, Illinois on March 20, 1992. The
ballet is staged for ABT by Wendy Somes and Malin Thoors.
Hee Seo will debut in Jerome Robbins’ Other Dances performing opposite David
Hallberg on Thursday evening, October 19. On Thursday evening, October 26, Cory Stearns
will dance the male lead for the first time alongside Gillian Murphy. Set to a waltz and four
mazurkas by Frédéric Chopin, Other Dances features costumes by Santo Loquasto and original
lighting by Nananne Porcher. The plotless, classical character pas de deux was created by
Robbins for a Gala evening for the Library for the Performing Arts at Lincoln Center at the
Metropolitan Opera House on May 9, 1976, performed by Natalia Makarova and Mikhail
Baryshnikov. Other Dances is staged for American Ballet Theatre by Isabelle Guerin.
On Thursday evening, October 19, Herman Cornejo, Alban Lendorf in a role debut,
Blaine Hoven, Calvin Royal III, Gabe Stone Shayer, Daniil Simkin, James Whiteside and Devon
Teuscher will dance the season’s first performance of Ratmansky’s Serenade after Plato’s
Symposium. Zhiyao Zhang in a role debut, Alexandre Hammoudi, Thomas Forster, Jose
Sebastian, Tyler Maloney, Arron Scott, Joseph Gorak and Hee Seo take over the same roles at
the matinee on Saturday, October 21. Set to music by Leonard Bernstein, the ballet features
scenery and costumes by Jérôme Kaplan and lighting by Brad Fields. Serenade after Plato’s
Symposium received its World Premiere by American Ballet Theatre on May 16, 2016 at the
Metropolitan Opera House.


Liam Scarlett’s Elegy pas de deux, from his 2014 work With a Chance of Rain will
receive its first performance of the season on Tuesday, October 24 performed by Hee Seo and
Roman Zhurbin in a role debut. Thomas Forster will debut in the ballet at the matinee of
Saturday, October 28. Set to music by Sergei Rachmaninoff, the ballet features costumes by
Scarlett and lighting by Brad Fields. Scarlett’s complete work was given its World Premiere by

American Ballet Theatre on October 22, 2014.

 

The World Premiere of a new work by Benjamin Millepied will be given on Wednesday

evening, October 25 with Devon Teuscher, Misty Copeland, Hee Seo, David Hallberg, Herman
Cornejo and Cory Stearns in the leading roles. Stephanie Williams, Cassandra Trenary,
Catherine Hurlin, Blaine Hoven, Daniil Simkin and Alexandre Hammoudi will debut in the roles
at the matinee on October 28. The new Millepied work, set to music by Philip Glass, features
costumes by Alessandro Sartori, Artistic Director of Italian luxury brand Ermenegildo Zegna and
lighting by Brad Fields.
Last season’s Company Premiere of Ratmansky’s Souvenir d’un lieu cher will return to
the repertory on Wednesday evening, October 25 performed by Stella Abrera, Sarah Lane,
Thomas Forster in a role debut and Alban Lendorf. Souvenir d’un lieu cher is set to music of the
same name by Peter Ilyitch Tchaikovsky, orchestrated by Alexander Glazunov. Featuring sets
and costumes by Keso Dekker with lighting by James F. Ingalls, the ballet for four dancers
received its World Premiere by Het National Ballet on February 16, 2012 in Amsterdam.
Millepied’s Daphnis and Chloe will be performed for the first time during the Fall season
on Wednesday evening, October 25 featuring Stella Abrera, Cassandra Trenary, Cory Stearns
and Calvin Royal III and Herman Cornejo making role debuts as Dorcon and Bryaxis
respectively. Isabella Boylston, Skylar Brandt, Blaine Hoven and Arron Scott take over these
roles on Thursday evening, October 26 with James Whiteside debuting as Daphnis. Set to music
by Maurice Ravel, Daphnis and Chloe features costumes by Holly Hynes, scenery by Daniel
Buren and lighting by Brad Fields. Daphnis and Chloe, adapted from the second century A.D.
novel by the Greek writer Longus, was choreographed by Millepied for the Paris Opera Ballet in
2014. Daphnis and Chloe was originally commissioned in 1912 by Serge Diaghilev for the
Ballets Russes. The ballet, which is staged for ABT by Janie Taylor and Sebastien Marcovici,
was given its Company Premiere on October 20, 2016 at the Koch Theater.

Tickets for American Ballet Theatre’s 2017 Fall season at the David H. Koch
Theater, priced from $25, are available online, at the Koch Theater box office or by phone at
212-496-0600. Performance-only tickets for the Opening Night Gala begin at $25. The David
H. Koch Theater is located at Lincoln Center, Broadway and 63rd Street in New York City. For
more information, visit ABT’s website at www.abt.org

 

Leadership support for Serenade after Plato’s Symposium and Ratmansky’s World Premiere, part of The
Ratmansky Project, has been provided by Mr. and Mrs. Hamilton E. James and the Blavatnik Family
Foundation, with additional support provided by Linda Allard, Sarah Arison, Avery and Andrew F. Barth,
Lisa and Dick Cashin, The Susan and Leonard Feinstein Foundation, Brian J. Heidtke, Lloyd E. Rigler –
Lawrence E. Deutsch Foundation, Bernard L. Schwartz, The Ted and Mary Jo Shen Charitable Gift Fund,
Melissa A. Smith, The H. Russell Smith Foundation/Stewart R. Smith and Robin A. Ferracone, Martin and
Toni Sosnoff Foundation, and Sutton Stracke.
Daphnis and Chloe has been generously supported by The Leila and Mickey Straus Family Charitable Trust
and through an endowed gift from the Toni and Martin Sosnoff New Works Fund.
Her Notes was commissioned with leadership support from the Virginia B. Toulmin Foundation. This
production has been generously supported through an endowed gift from the Toni and Martin Sosnoff New
Works Fund.
American Airlines is the Official Airline of American Ballet Theatre.
Northern Trust is the Leading Corporate Sponsor of the American Ballet Theatre Jacqueline Kennedy
Onassis School.
ABT is supported, in part, with public funds from the National Endowment for the Arts;

the New York
State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature;
and the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council.

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On 6/29/2017 at 8:45 PM, canbelto said:

I always associate Other Dances as being exactly wrong for Hallberg and Seo. It was made on Baryshnikov and Makarova, two very short dancers. Their compact size and Russian folk dance familiarity are part of the ballet's DNA. At NYCB it's still cast with short, terre-a-terre dancers. de Luz and Peck, or Garcia and Fairchild. 

 

I did see Kira Nichols and Sean Lavery perform Other Dances at NYCB. They may be casting it with shorter dancers now, but that wasn't always the rule.

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On 7/23/2017 at 3:07 PM, abatt said:

Laughed out loud when I read your comment, Natalia.  Canbelto, the photo is Misty and James Whiteside.  

 

Is there online copy of the photo?

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On 8/16/2017 at 0:27 PM, sandik said:

If I had money, and could clone myself, I know where I would be.

 

Would you be at any of these performances, sandik? There's nothing on the above calendar that attracts me. Or do you mean you would be in, say, St. Petersburg?

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3 hours ago, PeggyTulle said:

 

Is there online copy of the photo?

It's the same as the banner image at the top of this page:

 

https://davidhkochtheater.com/Season-Tickets/17-18-Season/American-Ballet-Theatre.aspx

 

I have to admit I found nothing unusual about the photo; it didn't give me pause when I received the brochure in the mail. It's well-composed and conveys that it's a season of (mostly) contemporary works. Copeland, like Murphy, has breasts that are larger than those of many female dancers, but to me, this photo isn't exploiting that fact or trying to use it as a selling point.

 

 

 

Edited by fondoffouettes

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On 6/30/2017 at 8:12 AM, lmspear said:

Once upon a time, when the theater had it's original name, I saw Farrell and Martin's do Other Dances.  They were wonderful.  

I agree with others here who loved the originators and prefer to see dancers of similar body type do Other Dances.  Back in the day, I saw Baryshnikov/McBride do Other Dances and they were wonderful.  I can't imagine Seo in this role; she just doesn't seem to have the intensity. 

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2 hours ago, angelica said:

 

Would you be at any of these performances, sandik? There's nothing on the above calendar that attracts me. Or do you mean you would be in, say, St. Petersburg?

 

Living in Seattle, I have limitations on what I can see live -- I'd be thrilled for a chance at Symphonic Variations.  And I've liked what I've seen so far of Ratmansky's work -- many of my colleagues had excellent things to say about the Serenade, and I'm very curious about it.  But, as my daughter's cohort often says, your mileage may vary.

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22 minutes ago, sandik said:

 

Living in Seattle, I have limitations on what I can see live -- I'd be thrilled for a chance at Symphonic Variations.  And I've liked what I've seen so far of Ratmansky's work -- many of my colleagues had excellent things to say about the Serenade, and I'm very curious about it.  But, as my daughter's cohort often says, your mileage may vary.

 

Thanks, sandik. Perhaps I'll reconsider and try to see Symphonic Variations. I saw the Serenade last year, and while I found it entertaining, I'm not sure I'd go to see it again. I do appreciate your input.

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3 hours ago, angelica said:

 

Thanks, sandik. Perhaps I'll reconsider and try to see Symphonic Variations. I saw the Serenade last year, and while I found it entertaining, I'm not sure I'd go to see it again. I do appreciate your input.

 

I've only ever seen Symphonic V on video, and in the cinema broadcast last summer, but I thought it was stunning.

 

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Cirio was listed as one of the principal dancers who would appear for the Fall season in the June press release.  Perhaps he is injured?

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17 hours ago, fondoffouettes said:

It's the same as the banner image at the top of this page:

 

https://davidhkochtheater.com/Season-Tickets/17-18-Season/American-Ballet-Theatre.aspx

 

I have to admit I found nothing unusual about the photo; it didn't give me pause when I received the brochure in the mail. It's well-composed and conveys that it's a season of (mostly) contemporary works. Copeland, like Murphy, has breasts that are larger than those of many female dancers, but to me, this photo isn't exploiting that fact or trying to use it as a selling point.

 

 

 

 

I had the same reaction.

It is certainly not an amateurish image (as I believe it was described earlier in the thread), and if the suggestion is simply that showing Misty in a leotard top (not a particularly revealing one) = Hooters, that is pretty offensive.

 

 

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