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miliosr

2017-18 Season

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On ‎1‎/‎8‎/‎2018 at 4:30 PM, miliosr said:

I would add Giselle to your list of Coppelia and La Sylphide as works that should always be cycling in-and-out of repertory.

When you refer to the "lost" Coppelia, are your referring to the Pierre Lacotte production that premiered in 1973-74 and repeated (according to the POB's own Web site) in 1974-75, 1977-78, 1978-79, 1979-80 and 1983-84? The Web site states that the Patrice Bart production premiered in 1995-96 (at the relative dawn of Madame Lefevre's tenure) and repeated in 1998-99, 2001-02, 2006-07 and 2010-11.

 


I apologize for a long post but, in order to properly answer, I must put certain things in their historical perspective. Giselle was last performed in Paris in 1868, there were plans for a reprise in 1870-ies, that came to nought, there was still a chance to preserve it from oblivion in 1880-ies when the original Albrecht, Lucien Petipa, was hired again as a professeur at l'Opéra, having been mercilessly kicked some twelve years earlier by Perrin. There were two beautiful representatives of the French school of dance who were considered worthy of the principal part, Léontine Beaugrand and, later, Julia Subra. Unfortunately, this didn't happen, the repertoire policies during ensuing 25 years of Gailhard, a man fundamentally hostile to ballet, at the helm of the Opéra, brought disastrous results for French ballet. The French ballet was then saved from extinction essentially by the Russians and a lucky coincidence of the miseries inflicted on them by the October Revolution, that sent many of their ballet luminaries to Paris as refugies. When Karsavina performed for the first time Giselle in 1910, the leading critics had to remind their readers what Giselle was about, by that time it was so irretrievably lost. Today Giselle danced, infrequently, at l'Opéra, descends from the Russian version, staged more than 40 years after the premiere in Paris.

Coppélia was the only ballet staged in Paris that never disappeared from the affiche. Until it was removed by Mme Lefèvre. There was a precedence, in 1960-ies. When Michel Descombey became directeur du ballet in 1962, Coppélia saw its 710-th representation. Descombey had an idea that something so perfect choreographically and musically must be replaced by a modern, what I call, "plastic", version (this was the dawn of the "plastic era"), and he produced his own Coppélia, by discarding Saint-Léon's brilliant choreography. The new Coppélia had 64 representations. It was on the affiche as long as he was in charge of the ballet at l'Opéra. It was shelved right after he was replaced and, by the initiative of Claude Bessy or Raymond Franchetti, Pierre Lacotte was entrusted with bringing back the original Coppélia. In the first 2 acts, Lacotte is essentially faithfully adhering to the original choreography that was still "in the limbs" of many dancers in Paris, he was allowed to exercise some creativity in his "reconstruction" of the divertissement of the 3rd act, that stopped to be performed already in 1873, essentially because a 3-act long ballet, it was always shown after an opera, was ending very late, often after midnight. That was considered too tiring for the public.

That the Lacotte's Coppélia was considered to be "bringing back" the classic work, not a new work, is reflected in the fact that the numbering of representations, recorded in the Opéra archives, was resumed from the last time the original Coppélia was performed in 1962, while Descombey's own Coppélia had its own representation numbering.

I saw lots of photographs, I saw decorations from Descombey's production, I didn't see the work itself. I am not aware of any recording either. It still could be a lot better than Patrice Bart's "modernization" with which Mme Lefèvre replaced the original Coppélia. Thankfully, we have a glorious recording of the École de danse performance of the original 2 acts. I consider it to be the most valuable recording made during almost 20 years of Lefèvre's era, for which we must be thankful solely to Claude Bessy and Pierre Lacotte. This is a unique document of a great choreographic tradition and of the original French style. It is also a monument to the work of Claude Bessy as directrice de l'École de danse. The quality of the school badly deteriorated since then due to lack of discipline and a lack of vision what are the aims of the ballet education.

Lacotte's recreation of La Sylphide has been done with such an incomparable taste, knowledge and feeling of the classical French idiom, it is impossible, in my opinion, to overestimate its importance. After 2001, we had only 3 times (!!) La Sylphide on the affiche, in 2004, in 2013, and last season, in July 2017, nine years apart, then four years apart ("only" four years, perhaps, because it happened after Lefèvre's removal). And no Coppélia in the repertoire of the company (it was shown twice by the school) since Noureev's complete désintéressment in French classics (which I ascribe to the misguidedly wrong idea instilled in him in 1950-ies in the USSR that the only worthy ballet works were Russian).

So, three times in almost 17 years, a work emblematic to the French style, opening the golden era in the history of French and the world ballet, and zero times, of the other work, the only authentic document of that grand style, that closed the golden era for us in Paris.

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There are several problems, the first is the programming at the Opera, it's simply ridiculous to see a ballet every 4 years or so, that way the dancers can never grow into a role. 

-The second is the catastrophic quality of the dancers, absolutely atrocious. 

- The third is the lack of legends coaching in the company, almost all the legends of the company are at the ecole (and they are the ones fixing what can be fixed after 7 years odlf mediocre training) but there are no legends coaching at the Opera, that is a tragedy, the people coaching at the opera were merely soloists in the 80's and 90's, alright, Hilaire, Legris and Le Riche are ADs now but Lacotte,Thesmar, Denard, Guixerix, Atannassof, Pontois, Loudieres, Delanoe, Arbo and Moussin are all available, if you don't have Etoiles coaching then the results are not good, Jean Guillaume Bart can't do it all. 

- The fourth problem is Dupont's casting, for the life of me, I can't understand.

 

 

On 1/7/2018 at 7:55 AM, Laurent said:

Pierre Lacotte is the only living choreographer with a profound knowledge and understanding of the classical idiom. Having somebody like him around, and not using him for the advantage of the troupe is truly lamentable.

I would take it much further, Pierre Lacotte is the only truly classical choreographer the world has seen since Petipa,much more classical than Sir Ashton, and the only choreographer who has put truly GRAND spectacles onstage, how his magnificent work is always insulted as "pastiche" while other people's pathetic work - which is truly a pastiche- gets praised, it's beyond me, I suppose only when Lacotte dies people will began to appreciate him and to cry over how great his work was. For me, Lacotte's work at the Opera should be like Yuri Nikolaevich's at the Bolshoi, its should be 40% of the company's repertoire, fine, as usual in France the profet was without honor in his homeland and blablabla but it makes me furious to see how Lacotte's work is performed more in Russia than in France. Where's Nathalie, Marco Spada, Ondine, The Pharaoh's daughter, La Vivandiere and Le Papillon?  

 

On 1/7/2018 at 7:55 AM, Laurent said:

I had a sense that Pierre Lacotte, present with Ghislaine Thesmar(what a fabulous artist she was) at every single performance, was thinking this was the last time in his life that he was seeing "La Sylphide" on the stage of Palais Garnier. With Mlle Dupont making chaotic decisions about casting, with her reprehensible repertoire choices, I am afraid he will not live to see another "La Sylphide".

:(:(

The run of La Sylphide was an absolute disaster, 0 romanticism, no épaulement, mediocre footwork( you know POB is in ruins when the footwork is bad) and absolutely no acting skills, no artistry, someone please remind these people that they are supposed to tell a story. I felt terribly sad for Lacotte, it was as if the dancers couldn't understand his instructions! It was heartbreaking to think that after seeing Thesmar( the greatest Sylphide of all time) Denard, Pontois, Atannasoff, Jude, Loudieres, Legris, Maurin, Hilaire, Platel, Le Riche, Moussin and Ganio he had to see his work so poorly danced by the new so-called "étoiles" Only Ould-Braham was adequate. Heymann brought much applause but he didn't got the style, La Sylphide is not Don Quixote, what a circus. 

 

Let's hope Lacotte outlives everyone and a decent AD arrives at the company ready to use his work :) (maybe Legris next year?) 

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On ‎1‎/‎10‎/‎2018 at 1:49 AM, Laurent said:

The quality of the school badly deteriorated since then due to lack of discipline and a lack of vision what are the aims of the ballet education.

 

On ‎1‎/‎11‎/‎2018 at 8:24 AM, Gnossie said:

-The second is the catastrophic quality of the dancers, absolutely atrocious.

The run of La Sylphide was an absolute disaster, 0 romanticism, no épaulement, mediocre footwork( you know POB is in ruins when the footwork is bad) and absolutely no acting skills, no artistry, someone please remind these people that they are supposed to tell a story.

So let me ask: Who are the current exemplars (if any) of the French style in the company?

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@Gnossie

The problems you are writing about are very real.

I share with you your highest opinion of Pierre Lacotte. I didn't think of him in your terms, but your idea that Lacotte should be for l'Opéra what Marius Petipa is for Mariinsky, and Grigorovich is for Bolshoi, a master choreographer whose work is associated with the artistic identity of the company, I find this idea fascinating, because whatever identity the ballet troupe of the Opéra had in the past, it has no identity anymore. A collection of dancers, many of whom, especially the youngest ones, don't know what are they doing in a work like, e.g., La Sylphide. I don't feel I can be as severe as you in my estimation of their ability when the passage of intimate knowledge from the greatest artists of one generation to the most talented ones of the next generation, which is the necessary mechanism for upholding excellence, has been severed, when the dancers are deprived of the daily contact with the classical idiom, when they are instead constantly occupied in works that could be perfectly fine at a place like Théâtre de Chaillot, but they are absolutely out of place on the stage of Grand Opéra. The presence of the great artists of the past in the company would make it simply impossible for Lefèvre, for Millepied, for Dupont, to carry out their repertoire and casting policies, therefore there cannot be any room at Opéra today for any of the legends of French ballet and the consequences are what they are.

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Oh Laurent, I couldn't possibly agree more with you, the situation not just at POB but in France (poor Opéra de Bordeaux) is absolutely catastrophic, Ballet is a FRENCH art, The Paris Opera is the oldest company in the world and its school is also the oldest. Yet few people seem to give a damn about this in the entire country, l'Opéra is a hostile place for the high art, I said I enjoyed Play and in fact I did, but at the same time I almost have a stroke when I see dancers trowing balls at the audience, people behaving like monkeys in what is supposed to be the temple of ballet, what an scandal, vulgarity beyond belief, but this goes way beyond of just the POB policies, it's de decadence in which France has been summed up, yes, too many wars forced the great romantic masters to go to Russia, but that doesn't justify that Giselle and La Sylphide were lost for so long that they became strangers, there is no respect, when I look at the way Bournonville preserved the original French tradition in his work because the original French tradition was murdered in France (in order of taking the infinitely inferior (to the point of being laughable) Italian training, which derived into the pastiche which is mistaken nowadays as "French tradition" and actually has little of French)  I get emotional, I also get emotional when I see the respect the Danes feel for their La Sylphide, and envy that Giselle and La Sylphide   -when performed- doesn't enjoy the same treatment in France, but could they? By the 1920's all the audience of the romantic era where dead, and from Lifar's tenure onwards there were no true classics to educate the audience, so you have a mostly ignorant audience that doesn't feel devotion for Giselle and who probably considers Ekmann and Teshigawara as "ballet" choreographers, there are also NO critics of classical ballet in the country (The last one was Luc Decygnes, who passed away in December). 

You're absolutely right @ Laurent, when the dancers are deprived of the daily contact with the classical idiom, and of the passage of knowledge from the legends, they can't understand La Sylphide....and when the Paris Opera dancers can't understand La Sylphide, it's impossible to avoid feeling depressed. Because it's depressing to see the mediocre teaching, the mediocre dancing and the mediocre management. 

 

5 hours ago, Laurent said:

 they are instead constantly occupied in works that could be perfectly fine at a place like Théâtre de Chaillot,

 Absolutely, it's depressing to see how l'Opéra it's used for so much garbage, Garnier didn't built the most beautiful Opera in the world so a lot of Forsythe, Bertraud, Peck and third rate versions of Petipa would be performed there. The Palais Garnier it is NOT the Théâtre de Chaillot. The disrespect!

 

Classical ballet is pretty much dead in France and the crisis at the POB and its school isn't new, the great Étoile Jean Guillaume Bart already stressed about the situation, long 12 years ago: 

 

"I’ve written to the Culture Minister, who hasn’t replied. So indeed, I am preoccupied with the fate of classical dance here. Other than the Paris Opera, Ballet du Capitole at Toulouse and the Ballet de l’Opéra at Bordeaux, the rest has vanished.

What’s happening at Marseilles is just awful - Roland Petit had set up a school intended to rival the Paris Opera, and today, I wonder what’s the point in keeping it open, since the troupe to which it’s attached, is too modern by half. It makes me angry. Whether there be a future for the classical dance, I do not know, but what I do know, is that we must try to save it. This art form was born in France, it is an art of beauty that is rigorous and very demanding. These values have been frittered away, as we seek whatever seems quick and easy."

Edited by Gnossie
added sentence

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On 1/13/2018 at 7:51 PM, miliosr said:

 

So let me ask: Who are the current exemplars (if any) of the French style in the company?

 

Among the women:

In the technical department: Charline Giezendanner.

In the Acting department: Eve Grinsztajn.

In the Allure department: Myriam Ould- Braham. 

In the Diva department: La Gillot.

 

Among the men: 

Mathieu Ganio, words aren't enough to describe him, you look at Ganio and you look at a true DANSEUR NOBLE, not a circus monkey, that placement, that neck, that jump, that petite and grand batterie, that remarkable stage presence, so strong but without exceeding the borders of the classical language, amazing actor, A POET, simply the FRENCH SCHOOL at its best, the one and only heir of Legris (and protégé of Lacotte, Atannassof and Hilaire for this reason)

 

Hervé Moreau:  Besides having elegant and impeccable technique, besides being naturally romantic and poetic, Moreau adds depth and credibility to his roles by the intensity of his dramatic gifts. The ARTIST of his generation, no dancer in the company can stand next to such an extraordinarily gifted ARTIST, lovely technician but my god, those acting skills! That presence! Every time Moreau danced the audience knew something special was about to happen, simply unique and extraordinary, an artist like you can no longer find, every ballerina in the company wanted to dance with Moreau, what an exceptional partner, the only dancer able to make Letestu melt. Unfortunately he has suffered too many injuries. His upcoming retirement will be a very sad day for the company since there doesn't seem to be any young dancer who could follow in his footsteps, perhaps Ganio. He is injured and won't be able to reprise one of his signatures roles: Oneguine.

 

Magnenet, Alu and Heymann are fine also.

Edited by Gnossie
corrected casting information

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Pierre Lacotte's La Sylphide is a total pastiche imagining of the original La Sylphide. It's not like the Bournonville version in which Bournonville was remembering how the ballet was as he danced it with Marie Taglioni. For instance there's no way Effie would have danced on pointe as she does in Lacotte's version.

Edited by canbelto

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5 hours ago, silvermash said:

Are you being humorous?

No, are you?

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15 hours ago, canbelto said:

Pierre Lacotte's La Sylphide is a total pastiche imagining of the original La Sylphide. It's not like the Bournonville version in which Bournonville was remembering how the ballet was as he danced it with Marie Taglioni. For instance there's no way Effie would have danced on pointe as she does in Lacotte's version.

I am afraid the only part true may be "It's not like the Bournonville version".

I am not discussing personal opinions, I will be discussing facts. It's worth to remember that Bournonville left l'Opéra in 1830, while La Sylphide was produced in 1832. He couldn't dance it with Marie Taglioni. In fact, he never danced in Paris with Marie Taglioni. The two were dancers of entirely different rang. From the moment when Marie Taglioni debuted at l'Opéra, in April 1828, until Bournonville's departure from Paris, she was dancing exclusively with two stars of the company, celebrated danseurs, Monsieur Albert and Monsieur Paul, in the beginning she was also partnered by her brother, Paul Taglioni, and on a few, perhaps only three occasions, she was dancing with Lefebvre in the divertissement of the opera Le Rossignol. Bournonville, whose dancing career saw its peak in 1827 and was on a sharp decline already in 1828, and even more in 1829, was dancing with the likes of Mmes Athalie, Fourcisi, Hullin, Perceval, Vigneron, Louisa, Roland, i.e., with dancers of the second rang, like himself. Alluding to your post in another thread, if you wish you could see Bournonville dancing, I suggest that seeing either Albert or Paul would be much more rewarding.

Concerning your unassailable proof "For instance there's no way Effie would have danced on pointe as she does in Lacotte's version.", where does your certainty come from ? Barely a month had passed since Marie Taglioni debuted as an artiste of l'Opéra, when the ballet critic of Le Figaro was writing in May 1828:

Quote

A l’exemple de Mlle Taglioni , toutes ces dames ne procèdent plus que par pointes


And this was full four years before La Sylphide ! If "all these ladies, following the example of Mlle Taglioni, were proceeding only on pointes", do you think it possible that Lisa Noblet, the greatest star of l'Opéra of the day, second only to Taglioni, the Effie of the original La Sylphide, could proceed differently? Her name was listed in the programme of La Sylphide before the name of Taglioni. On lithographs preserved in the Opéra archives, Effie-Noblet is shown wearing pointes, as they looked at that time !


Thousands of people throughout Europe saw La Sylphide danced by Marie Taglioni. All the ballet personalities of the period 1832-1844. Bournonville was among them. In his own production of 1836, he was prevented from using the original music. Do you think he was allowed to use the original choreography? In 1861 Marius Petipa, who at that time was unknown outside Petersbourg (it will be nine more years before he finally becomes the chief maître de ballet there), used just one single pas de seul by Perrot in a ballet produced for his own wife. The scandal this created led to a court case in Paris, followed intently by the parisian press, and Marius Petipa was convicted guilty ! This is how he gained the notoriety before, almost 40 years later, gaining in Paris recognition also as a consummate choreographer.

So, Bournonville was unable to use the music, very unlikely to be able to use the choreography, and certainly not having at his disposal stars like Mlle Noblet for the secondary roles like Effie. Which proves your case that Bournoville's Sylfiden was indeed very different.

According to what I know, Pierre Lacotte's most valuable asset in his reconstitution of the original La Sylphide was the archive inherited from the heirs of Taglioni. My recollection is it's been kept at Louvre, uncatalogued, in an unknown location. It was a miracle that Locatte was able to locate it, finding the archive provided him with an enormous stimulus and, perhaps, an invaluable information about the ballet, not available from any other source. He also, of course, was perfectly familiar with everything that was preserved from Bournonville's work in toto, not just Sylfiden, plus all the testimonies and descriptions. By that time Lacotte was also uniquely equipped with all that he could have had learned directly from the great ballerinas steeped in the 19-th century ballet variations, like Carlotta Zambelli or Lioubov Egorova, who were still alive and active when he was young. Pierre Lacotte may be the last person in France who knows those variations. This knowledge will be irretrievably lost when he passes away, thanks to what has become of ballet in France during last 20 years.

In the end, what counts is how successful is the result of his work. In my opinion, it is a chef-d'œuvre. Now, you can proceed and compare the result with some of the works presented to the public as reconstructions, "as faithful as possible", of the original versions of ballets. One of them was broadcast recently from Bolshoi. Then you have at least two versions of the "authentic Petipa" Swan Lake, Esmeralda, Raymonda, Ivanov's Nutcracker, and of course, two versions of the "authentic Petipa" Sleeping Beauty.

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4 hours ago, Laurent said:

So, Bournonville was unable to use the music, very unlikely to be able to use the choreography, and certainly not having at his disposal stars like Mlle Noblet for the secondary roles like Effie. Which proves your case that Bournoville's Sylfiden was indeed very different.

 

The use of a different score for the Bournonville version is an interesting historical detail. At least according to some, Bournonville could not afford to purchase the rights to the French score and commissioned a new one. See "musical notes" near the bottom on this site, e.g.:

http://www.bournonville.com/bournonville14.html

"Baron Herman Severin Løvenskiold, a composer who has since been neglected, composed the music for Bournonville's version of La Sylphide. There was not enough money to buy the admired tones of Schneitzhoeffer's original Paris production. Instead, Bournonville worked closely with the 20-year-old nobleman Løvenskiold, with the intention of creating new, melodious and dramatically illustrative music that could support the ballet master's version of this story. "

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Exactly, Bournonville never danced La Sylphide with Taglioni, he could have traveled to Paris and see the production and remember it well, no doubt of it, there's also no doubt he wanted to mount his production of La Sylphide in Copenhagen but Schneitzhoeffer's score was too expensive, it's very unlikely that Bournonville could reproduce Taglioni's production since he had to choreograph to different (and much better) music because Schneitzhoeffer's score was too expensive, we should also remind that Bournonville (whom I revere like a god) was considered a second rate choreographer in France at the time, but of course, why do base an opinion on facts when one can simply insult someone's work, surely most people know more than, you know, Pierre Lacotte.

 

 @ Laurent how I wish you were the minister of culture, because the current one doesn't even know what entrechat is :( 

Edited by Gnossie

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16 hours ago, Gnossie said:

No, are you?

No, I was just asking, because most of what you had written at first looked so odd to me.  You have considerably edited your post and most of it has been erased, I don't really want to comment your taste...

Anyway, in my opinion, Mathieu  Ganio is an elegant dancer that I like to watch in classical pieces for his refinement, his delicacy of movement and he is an excellent partner. He is yes a good representative of the French style, but he’s neither a great actor (although he tends to improve), neither a great technician.
Hervé Moreau? I don't know... He is the Ghost of the opera. His most popular role is probably… himself in the Défilé!  He must have danced in not more than 20 programmes or so since he has been made Etoile in 2006. That night was the last time I saw him in a classical ballet and this run of Bayadère (March 2006) was indeed the last time he danced a classical role in Paris!!! If he is not cast in Onegin (where he was quite good indeed), it is because he can’t simply perform and in fact, it would have been reasonable for him and honest to the company, to resign years ago, as Jean-Guillaume Bart did.
 

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@Gnossie

Perhaps a more important reason than using a different score was that, in order to reproduce Filippo Taglioni's choreography, Bournonville would have needed to secure a permission to do that, in which case the production would bear the name of Taglioni, not of Bournonville (I am leaving aside how much this would have cost Bournonville). There is after all a reason why Bournonville's "Sylphide" is called this way. On the other hand, there are known precedents at that time of a ballet having the musical score changed while retaining the name of the choreographer.

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Yes,  silvermash, you shouldn't comment on my taste, I already know it's exquisite.

Miliosr asked about which dancers represent the tradition, not about which dancer dances more performances.

Maybe for you HM is the ghost of the Opera, for me he's THE Artist of the company, I've seen him dance many many times before and after his appointment, it is a disgrace that his career has been cursed by so many serious injuries.

It is well known that he presented his resignation and Lefebvre didn't accept it. 

 

But the point is that for me not only Moreau represents the french tradition (elegant, impeccable, refined technique) he is also the finest artist of the company, if not the only ARTIST of the company, no other danseur can put on stage what he can, His performances in Les Mirages, The lady of the Camelias, Romeo and Juliet and Oneguine are the finest I've seen from any danseur in the company and it's not a coincidence that 3 of the best 5 performances I've seen at the Opera in the last 10 years had him in the lead. Even his appearances in Millepieds stupid pieces were superb, showing what an Étoile is.  Always adding depth and emotion to what could otherwise be little short of a catastrophe with any other dancer.

 

And yes, he won't dance in Oneguine because he is injured. But he's certainly not a ghost Étoile, if he didn't dance was because of injury, and when healthy he always danced, what I call phantom étoiles can be resumed in two names: Belignard and Cozette, rarely injured yet I can count with one hand their number of performances, the former is finally retired, the later is supposedly alive. Those are phantom étoiles. 

 

But to each his own.

Edited by Gnossie

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I wholeheartedly agree on Gnossie's Opinion on Herve Moreau, he was the finest dancer dancing Onegin in his generation, even better than the dancers from Stuttgart. It is unfortunate that he was injured so much that he rarely was on stage these recent years, but he had appeared in some galas in Japan and did show his excellent artistry. Also Mathieu Ganio has been maturing as an artist while representing the French tradition and becoming a fine actor. 

I enjoyed reading Gnossie's opinion on POB dancers, and of course we all have our own preferences and tastes but I think they are a very good view and agreed on many of them (not all), so it is a pity that many of them were deleted. 

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We all have personal taste and me too I think Hervé Moreau was really good in Onegin but this is not enough to qualify him as the artist of the company! He has cancelled so many times, so often at the last minute putting his colleagues (partners and substitutes) in difficult situations with side effects on the audience too! Someone who has shown up so little on stage in so few ballets can of cause keep an aura but, to my opinion, he doesn’t deserve it.

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20 hours ago, Gnossie said:

Yes,  silvermash, you shouldn't comment on my taste, I already know it's exquisite.

:lol:

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Thanks Naomi, in fact Moreau is the best Onéguine I've ever seen, with his unique ability of becoming the role + such  natural authority and magnetism  he didn't had to "try" to be Onéguine, he WAS Onéguine. 

I had to delete my explanation on the girls because it made the post outrageously long :( 

 

Silvermash, if he canceled was because of injuries, there's nothing one can do about that, he never canceled because he fancied to.. a La Cojocaru.

Edited by Gnossie

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The provisional casting for Onéguine is up: 

 

Tatiana:

Hecquet

Gilbert

Albisson

Pagliero

...

...

..

Park. 

 

Onéguine

Ganio.

Bullion.

Bezard.

..

..

..

Marcand.

 

 

Olga

Ould-Braham.

Zusperreguy.

Baulac.

Barbeau.

Duboscq.

 

Lensky

Heymman.

Quer.

Reveau.

Marque.

Louvet.

 

 

Not casting Ould-Braham and Zusperreguy as Tatiana, Casting Gilbert, Pagliero and PARK as Tatiana? And casting Marchand as Onéguine, has Dupont read the story? Onéguine is supposed to be a MAN not a boy. I wish Chaillet had been given a chance, Bullion is paired with Park, may god help him.

Trilled for Barbeau and Raveau! They should be lovely as Olga and Lensky respectively.

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I suspect whoever responsible to casting in POB has some misunderstanding on the story and its spirit. 

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8 hours ago, Rosalie said:

I suspect whoever responsible to casting in POB has some misunderstanding on the story and its spirit. 

Dupont is doing the casting but Reid Anderson came last November to check the dancers

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On 1/14/2018 at 7:46 PM, Gnossie said:

 

Among the women:

In the technical department: Charline Giezendanner.

In the Acting department: Eve Grinsztajn.

In the Allure department: Myriam Ould- Braham. 

In the Diva department: La Gillot.

Thank you for an exciting discussion. I know very little about the POB and the French style and it is exciting to be getting into it, so watching lots of videos and trying to remember the precious few performances of Paris dancers that I had been fortunate enough to see.

For now, out of the active ladies really enjoying Gillot and Pagliero, the others don't care about as much for some reason, but will keep watching.

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Does Gillot dance much classical ballet anymore? I don't remember her being cast in anything recently.

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