Jump to content
pherank

UNBOUND 2018: A Festival of New Works

Recommended Posts

Posted (edited)

The only review I've seen of the openings is by Alastair Macaulay in the NYT, and he apparently only went to Program A. That link will hopefully appear in our LINKS section soon. But I've not heard anything about Program B which is occurring at the same time. So here are some related Instagram postings:

 

[Rollover image below to see arrows and click through the photos]

Note from Ballet Mistress Katita Waldo

Statement from Joseph Walsh to the company and Unbound Festival choreographers

 

 

Edited by pherank

Share this post


Link to post

I’ve been Googling for reviews for a few days and nothing at all, not even the SJ Mercury, which seems to post reviews fairly promptly, and nothing from SFGate so far.  Very curious.

 The best news in Macaulay’s review is that Joseph Walsh is back on stage, although Franziskonis’ partner is listed in the on-line Casting as corps dancer Joseph Warton.  Given that later in the review, Alonzo King’s ballet 'The Collective Agreement' is referred to in shortened form as ‘Argument’ (“As in Mr. King’s ‘Argument’, these duets…”), it’s a little hard to know what, if anything, is correct.

 Anyway, it sounds like the first three each had various merits; I look forward to hearing other opinions from BTers.

Share this post


Link to post
Posted (edited)
6 minutes ago, PeggyR said:

The best news in Macaulay’s review is that Joseph Walsh is back on stage, although Franziskonis’ partner is listed in the on-line Casting as corps dancer Joseph Warton.  

Quiggin confirmed that it was Joseph Warton who danced, and not Walsh. Walsh's Intagram post above makes it pretty clear that he'll be sidelined for the season. So he's dealing with the same emotional issues that Froustey, Zahorian and Powell went through not so long ago. Joe will just have to let his body take the time it needs to recover. Hopefully he's able to continue with cross-training and things like yoga or Pilates to stay in shape.

Edited by pherank

Share this post


Link to post
Posted (edited)

Some thoughts regarding the upcoming symposium "Where Is Ballet Going?"…

The symposium trailer video contains little content, but two statements made in the video have stuck with me:

"If you think of classical ballet as a style, then it's something ephemeral. If you think of it as a science of movement - it has an eternity to it."
—Alonzo King

"It's finding a way for ballet to step down from its pedestal, and become something that really speaks to people in a contemporary way about contemporary things - without losing the sense it has to amplify things…"
—Cathy Marston

I just like King's "big picture" statement, but it's Marston's viewpoint that I've been wrestling with (and it's just one statement and we don't get to hear her flesh the idea out). Dwight Rhoden seems to echo Marston's sentiment when he says, "we have to always be talking about things that are interesting, and that are relevant to the world we live in today." Being "relevant" and "contemporary" is always going to be an issue for people involved in business, or entertainment, or politics. Whereas the world of art, seems to demand something more. Perhaps that's what Marston means when she says, "without losing the sense it [ballet] has to amplify things". I can't say for certain what she she was thinking, but I'm going to assume it has something to do with the universal aspect of art, art that transcends the individual, or is simply an expression of the imagination that surpasses mere utility. The problem I (always) have with talk about art needing to be topical, or contemporary, or relevant, is that a huge percentage of the important artwork created over the centuries does not rely upon those attributes to be effective.

Naturally someone is going to say that ballet should be relevant - it sounds hip, it sounds "now", it sounds politically correct (depending on your affiliations), and it sounds responsible. But is any of that actually important to fine art, or ballets? Just how much historically recognized 'great' art was created for the above reasons? Classical ballets based on folk and fairy tales may have had a contemporary aspect to them (and the surrounding culture may have had a fascination for Medieval/Renaissance costume and settings), but the great majority of Petipa, Bournonville, Ballet Russes projects (by Fokine, Nijinksy, Nijinska, Massine and Balanchine), and the later Balanchine (in the U.S.) rarely look to topical or contemporary subjects. Topical results in the forgotten, such as "The Veteran, or the Hospitable House" (Bournonville), the terrible, such as "PAMTGG" (Balanchine), or the cute but forgettable, such as "Le Train Bleu" (Massine) or "Alma Mater" (Balanchine), or occasionally a triumph such as "Slaughter on Tenth Avenue" or "The Seven Deadly Sins" (Balanchine, but thanks goes to the originators: Rodgers and Hart, Weill and Brecht). The best works are more concerned with universal themes such as mortality and unrequited love. Or they involve 'pure dance' in which the forms described by the steps and movements are the real focus of the ballet - the dancing is the message and not a divertissement set within a traditional narrative.

"…finding a way for ballet to step down from its pedestal"
Ballet has been identified with 'upper class' activities/entertainment for many decades, but that is something of a misrepresentation by people who often don't spend any time with ballet, or never looked into the actual history of the art. Although supported by the aristocracy, dancers and stage artists in France, Russia, and Italy rarely came from the upper classes, and even successful careers were relatively short. Good fortune usually did not last long for the 'artists'. Russian workers during the Russian Revolution quickly came to love ballet performances, even though originally all of the ballets were created specifically to appeal to the aristocracy who bankrolled the Imperial Ballet. Obviously there were many aspects to the ballet that had a universal appeal - and I don't think it was mere escapism, or sentimentality. If ballet is still "on a pedestal", is the pedestal real in any sense, or simply a convenient stereotype to use when ballet companies complain about having to raise money from wealthy donors, or audience members balk at another fairy tale remake, or bemoan ticket prices and lack of access to the best companies? Is ballet always perched on a pedestal? Or does the pedestal only materialize when classical/traditional ballets are performed?

Interestingly, the only negative complaints I hear about Unbound Festival ballets, so far, have been targeted at ballet content that referenced the topical, or was "too literal" in its depiction of everyday activities. Is the search for relevance helping or hindering artistic inspiration?

Edited by pherank

Share this post


Link to post

Rebecca King Ferraro and Michael Breeden are in San Francisco for the UNBOUND Festival, and they have two published two podcast episodes of "Conversations on Dance" so far: 

Meet the Artist with Justin Peck (live audience):

https://conversationsondancepod.com/2018/04/23/justin-peck-live-from-san-francisco-ballets-unbound-festival/

 

An interview with Dores Andre:

https://conversationsondancepod.com/2018/04/20/sfb-unbound-dores-andre/

There are more to come; one mentioned is a Meet the Artist with Myles Thatcher.

I even bought a set of bluetooth earbud thingies with their discount code, :D.

Share this post


Link to post
Posted (edited)
10 hours ago, pherank said:

Interestingly, the only negative complaints I hear about Unbound Festival ballets, so far, have been targeted at ballet content that referenced the topical, or was "too literal" in its depiction of everyday activities. Is the search for relevance helping or hindering artistic inspiration?

Good summing up. But there's a difference in incorporating the topical, which quickly dates, and the vernacular – say the certain way people walk in the streets during certain decades, as Robbins and others do. Balanchine told Ruthanna Boris to look at everything she sees in everyday life, even something like the sparkle of broken glass in the street.

In the visual arts modernism has always had a strong element of classicism underpining it. You can find Palladio under early modernist architecture (Balanchine has been compared to Palladio by Deborah Gans), Brunelleschi under Mies van der Rohe, Giotto under Cubism. Post-modernism tried to reintroduce ornamentation and a gothic complexity but couldn't get the formula right.

I think there's always a classical dispostion of space under good contemporary dance such as  that of Justin Peck, Alexei Ratmansky, Merce Cunningham, etc.

Edited by Quiggin

Share this post


Link to post

Reporting in on seeing Program B's Saturday night opener. Pretty exciting vibe, there at the War Memorial Opera House. I saw some of the choreographers, sat near some of the creative team members (maybe scenic designer or composer). It was great fun at the end of each ballet to see the quartet of creators onstage with the dancers. Gave you a real sense of what a big deal all of this is. I didn't attend the 2008 (?) festival of 10 new works, so this was a new, fun feeling for me.

I published my review at Bachtrack; hopefully the link is forthcoming on the correct page here, but in the meantime, the link is posted at The Classical Girl as well. 

Thoughts that don't sound like a duplicate of my review...

Myles Thatchers' Otherness was a cute, fun way to start the night; I don't think the ballet would have been as successful anywhere else in the evening's lineup. The swimsuits, swim caps and goggle sunglasses, the preening, brought to mind Possokhov's Swimmer, and I think it had been Thatcher's intention to make it feel sort of mid-20th century, the rigid norms and beliefs of the 1950's. The two separate groups, I'll call them the "pinks" and the "blues" had their own signature moves, but honestly, I didn't catch on that one was "synchronized swimming team" and the other was "swing-dancing, rugby-esque circus clowns" - the program's description, not mine. Which, I have to say, led to problems in interpreting/enjoying the ballet. There was so much story involved; it was so packed with "a riff on gender binaries" and how we perceive those who are different, and how, when threatened with something new and unfamiliar, we pull back, retreat to the comfortable, that I'm thinking more about the program notes than the actual dancing. In writing the review, i was appalled to see how little I commented (and/or retained) about the dance steps. Max Cauthorn looked incredibly dynamic as the Protagonist, the male lead, and I'm just so pleased to see the way he's living up to the promise he showed as a younger dancer, and, indeed, seems headed toward performing at a level reserved for the principals. It was great to see Sean Orza as the "pink" equivalent of Max, and they had a really nice pas de deux at one point. I really like seeing same sex pas de deux. What fascinates me is that Thatcher cast Lauren Strongin as the "pink" leader, for the second cast (or at least this was what was relayed in the program) and that Lauren will at times be lifting her partner (Vitor Luiz?). Wow, would I love to see that cast perform. Jahna Frantziskonis (boy, does auto-correct hate her name) was great fun as one of the lead "blues" - strutting and showing attitude. I was surprised to discover that James Sofranko was the "blue" equivalent - with their swim caps and goggle sunglasses, you didn't really know who was who. 

My other complaint here was that it became a little preachy and heavy-handed, kind of like a Tele-Tubbies episode, all that pink and blue and unambiguous "we shouldn't ostracize people who are different or think differently". My sense is that less would have been more, and I almost wanted more abstraction, so that the dancing, the dancers' body language, told the story. I think "Ghosts in the Machine' found the sweet spot a little more effectively.

Will comment in detail later on the other two ballets. For now, Cathy Marston's Snowblind seemed to be a big hit with the other critics, and I enjoyed it - Van Patten, Froustey and Birkjaer were fabulous and had great synergy - but it was David Dawson's Anima Animus that really dazzled me. Such good dancing - I wanted to name every ensemble dancer in my review, but with an 800 word limit, that couldn't happen.

Share this post


Link to post

Wow, did it bother me that Alastair Macaulay named the wrong dancer in his review. It was indeed Joseph Wharton, and it bothers me every time I see the mistake hasn't been fixed. Oh well, I guess Joseph Wharton can take comfort in the fact that Macaulay thought he was as superior a dancer as Joseph Walsh. So sorry Walsh is still unable to perform, but yes, as someone commented, it is what Froustey, Zahorian and Powell (didn't know this one) went through - and wasn't Lonnie Weeks injured for a spell, delaying a deserved promotion? So happy he did, in the end, receive it.

Share this post


Link to post
1 hour ago, Terez said:

Will comment in detail later on the other two ballets. For now, Cathy Marston's Snowblind seemed to be a big hit with the other critics, and I enjoyed it - Van Patten, Froustey and Birkjaer were fabulous and had great synergy - but it was David Dawson's Anima Animus that really dazzled me. Such good dancing - I wanted to name every ensemble dancer in my review, but with an 800 word limit, that couldn't happen.

Thanks so much for the report, Terez! I'm glad to hear something about the David Dawson ballet - we just don't know his work in the U.S. but as Sofiane Sylve has mentioned in a Q&A, he's been choreographing in Europe for a long while, and I believe he was the first choreographer to create new work on her. Myles Thatcher may be overdue for a stumble - but that's how we learn. He's a very smart guy and I think he will come out of this with a better sense for how to pair things down and simplify the ideas he's trying to get across. Being young, he tries to put everything including the kitchen sink into his ballets.

1 hour ago, Terez said:

Wow, did it bother me that Alastair Macaulay named the wrong dancer in his review. It was indeed Joseph Wharton, and it bothers me every time I see the mistake hasn't been fixed. Oh well, I guess Joseph Wharton can take comfort in the fact that Macaulay thought he was as superior a dancer as Joseph Walsh. So sorry Walsh is still unable to perform, but yes, as someone commented, it is what Froustey, Zahorian and Powell (didn't know this one) went through - and wasn't Lonnie Weeks injured for a spell, delaying a deserved promotion? So happy he did, in the end, receive it.

Lizzie Powell had the same multi-fracture foot injury that Vanessa had suffered, and it definitely derailed her progress for a long period. That's why she sort of disappeared from notice. But this season she has been fairly busy again with demi-soloist roles.
I think we all miss Joe Walsh's presence - he just adds a dose of charisma and intensity that is always appreciated. This is just total conjecture, but Walsh finely started working with Masha - who has gradually lost most of her favored partners - and then Joe has to withdraw from performances, and I think it played into her decision to move on (along with a number of other things of course). I remember the rehearsal footage of Masha, Walsh, and Wei Wang (I think it was the Dawson piece, actually) and Wang struggles to keep from dropping Masha. If there's one thing Kochetkova doesn't like, it's partners who are unsure or weak in their lifts. She needs to feel totally secure in the air (and really, what female dancer doesn't?). Wei Wang is a real talent when dancing solo, but he is still learning the partnering side of things. I don't think Masha wants anyone to practice on her - not at this stage of her career. She just wants to dance with the most experienced and talented danseurs. And I don't think she has Sylve's natural interest in coaching and teaching.

Btw, did you see the Kochetkova and Sylve cast of Anima Animus?

Share this post


Link to post
17 hours ago, pherank said:

The problem I (always) have with talk about art needing to be topical, or contemporary, or relevant, is that a huge percentage of the important artwork created over the centuries does not rely upon those attributes to be effective.

I think you've hit on why I'm ambivalent about the Unbound Festival. 'Relevant' dances that are very 'Now' one moment can become very 'Then' the next. Or as Isadora Duncan said in a different context: "[It] dies as soon as it is made."

I suppose my ambivalence also stems from this: What does this emphasis on "being relevant" mean for what I can only describe as the "white tights and tutus" genre of ballet? In the future, will anyone be interested in making new dances in that genre? Or is it now a spent field in terms of new work? [Note: I understand that cost may have prevented any of the Unbound choreographers from working "in the grand manner". But, in any event, how many of them are all that interested in making those kinds of lavish dances that don't make you think (to quote Croce)?]

 

Share this post


Link to post
36 minutes ago, miliosr said:

I think you've hit on why I'm ambivalent about the Unbound Festival. 'Relevant' dances that are very 'Now' one moment can become very 'Then' the next. Or as Isadora Duncan said in a different context: "[It] dies as soon as it is made."

I suppose my ambivalence also stems from this: What does this emphasis on "being relevant" mean for what I can only describe as the "white tights and tutus" genre of ballet? In the future, will anyone be interested in making new dances in that genre? Or is it now a spent field in terms of new work? [Note: I understand that cost may have prevented any of the Unbound choreographers from working "in the grand manner". But, in any event, how many of them are all that interested in making those kinds of lavish dances that don't make you think (to quote Croce)?]

That's a great question Miliosr. And it makes me wonder what the "grand manner" might look like in this day and age. I get the feeling that someone like Justin Peck probably does wonder about how to approach large scale ballets with more developed costumes and sets, but I don't think he's figured out how to go about it, yet. Contemporary ballets have always skewed towards "pure dance" over involved narratives with characters and mime. Personally, I wouldn't mind seeing a revitalization of character dances, folk dances and mime in ballet, but it's going to take a brilliant choreographer to 'modernize' those styles/skills and make them feel contemporary (it does not have to be about stereotypes!). Then more of the younger audience will tune in to developments in ballet.

Share this post


Link to post
17 hours ago, Helene said:

Rebecca King Ferraro and Michael Breeden are in San Francisco for the UNBOUND Festival, and they have two published two podcast episodes of "Conversations on Dance" so far: 

Meet the Artist with Justin Peck (live audience):

https://conversationsondancepod.com/2018/04/23/justin-peck-live-from-san-francisco-ballets-unbound-festival/

 

An interview with Dores Andre:

https://conversationsondancepod.com/2018/04/20/sfb-unbound-dores-andre/

There are more to come; one mentioned is a Meet the Artist with Myles Thatcher.

I even bought a set of bluetooth earbud thingies with their discount code, :D.

Both very good interviews. I hadn't heard Dores' story about falling on stage at Lincoln Center, and I laughed at how she chose between ballet and swimming - "I really liked ballet because you talked to people, and you're not under the water the whole time".
Hopefully Ferraro and Breeden will be interviewing other festival choreographers that are mostly unknown in the U.S. And people like Alonzo King who should be more recognized.

Share this post


Link to post
11 hours ago, pherank said:

Personally, I wouldn't mind seeing a revitalization of character dances, folk dances and mime in ballet, but it's going to take a brilliant choreographer to 'modernize' those styles/skills and make them feel contemporary (it does not have to be about stereotypes!).

I do like that Cathy Marston is committed to the narrative form with actual plots and named characters. Snowblind (a.k.a. Ethan Frome) could have come from Martha Graham or Antony Tudor. (Or Joan Crawford -- see the recent Feud series.)

4 hours ago, pherank said:

Personally, I think people may be arguing at cross purposes (surprise, surprise) since it is likely the reviewer doesn't object to Thatcher's themes of gender equality and identity, per se, but to Thatcher's handling of the subject matter, and his choreography in this particular ballet.

It would be perfectly legitimate for a reviewer to note that there are some things dance -- as a non-verbal, non-written art form -- cannot express easily, if at all. The choreographer may have the best of intentions but that doesn't mean the intentions translate into dance.

As for Dores Andre, I read her Instagram post. My one cautionary note for her would be that there's no company alive capable of moving easily from the classical to the contemporary to social protest "art". The mixed reviews for the San Francisco Ballet's performances of Sleeping Beauty suggest that it's not so easy to exist in all those worlds simultaneously. To put it another way, Justin Peck sneaker ballets may not help you with Sleeping Beauty and may actually work against you.

 

Share this post


Link to post
19 hours ago, pherank said:

Btw, did you see the Kochetkova and Sylve cast of Anima Animus?

I did - it seems as though that cast is remaining the lone cast -- or maybe we will see a second cast (for other ballets as well) next week? Both Sylve and Kochetkova were stunning to watch. It's a real delight to see them dancing such similar steps, at one point in unison, and seeing the way their different bodies and personal aesthetics respond. It was uncanny, actually, that at one point their unison was flawless, and it was as if they'd both tapped into the core of the music, the artfulness of the steps, so that their physical differences disappeared and they were like mirror images, the music and steps just flowing through them. ((LOL, don't know if any of that made sense - it was like a prose poem gone bad!))

I was crazy about the costumes and lighting from Dawson's ballet. James F. Ingalls did lighting for every single ballet - maybe for the whole festival - and this one was truly unique, along with a room/box-like set. When the dancers were downstage, the lighting seemed fairly normal, but when they danced far upstage, it almost felt like an optical illusion - their bodies seemed so small next to all the whiteness, and they became more of a silhouette. Again, I'm likely describing it poorly, but it was amazing to watch. And I think that, after the heavy storytelling of Otherness and Snowblind, I liked that this was much more about movement. Everything felt light, airy, sky-bound. It felt particularly poignant, watching Masha, knowing she'll be leaving. And Sylve, as always, is just such a beautiful, classy, refined dancer, resisting any easy categorization. 

I realize I haven't brought up Cathy Marston's Snowbound. The performances by Van Patten, Froustey and Birkkjaer could not have been better. It really defined the ballet and what people would bring home from it. Froustey, in particular, was this lone ray of sunshine, in this beautiful coral dress, the only dollop of color in the ballet. Which is/was as it should be, but boy, without the joy and buoyancy her character (and Froustey herself) brought to the story, I would have found the ballet to be effective but a little too dreary. But I noticed that all the reviewers I admire had loads of positive things to say about her ballet. 

Of the three ballets, I'm crossing my fingers that Animus Anima will get slotted into next year's season. But it wouldn't surprise me if Snowbound claimed the spot instead.

Share this post


Link to post
1 hour ago, Terez said:

Of the three ballets, I'm crossing my fingers that Animus Anima will get slotted into next year's season. But it wouldn't surprise me if Snowbound claimed the spot instead.

I checked - there are 5 open slots to fill, so you may get your wish. I also wonder about Ochoa's Guernica being included.
But here's a novel idea: SFB could conceivably rotate through much of the 12 Unbound works using these 5 "slots"; although there would only be 2 or 3 performances of each.

Share this post


Link to post
On ‎4‎/‎24‎/‎2018 at 4:21 PM, miliosr said:

I think you've hit on why I'm ambivalent about the Unbound Festival. 'Relevant' dances that are very 'Now' one moment can become very 'Then' the next. Or as Isadora Duncan said in a different context: "[It] dies as soon as it is made."

I suppose my ambivalence also stems from this: What does this emphasis on "being relevant" mean for what I can only describe as the "white tights and tutus" genre of ballet? In the future, will anyone be interested in making new dances in that genre? Or is it now a spent field in terms of new work? [Note: I understand that cost may have prevented any of the Unbound choreographers from working "in the grand manner". But, in any event, how many of them are all that interested in making those kinds of lavish dances that don't make you think (to quote Croce)?]

How many are interested? A more basic question is: "How many are competent enough? - My answer is: none.

Concerning the issue of "relevance", especially in the context of "relevance" allowed to have only one, particular meaning, I can't shed a feeling that some authors producing similarly "relevant" works, do this out of calculated or instinctive opportunism.

Share this post


Link to post

Nobody competent enough to make lavish mindless dances - what a sad state of affairs.

Share this post


Link to post
1 hour ago, yodasan said:

Nobody competent enough to make lavish mindless dances - what a sad state of affairs.

OK, that was funny. I almost got water up my nose.
But to be fair to various classical ballets - they haven't lasted simply because they contain "lavish dances that don't make you think". And I'm not sure Arlene Croce really believes that.

Share this post


Link to post
On 4/24/2018 at 1:38 PM, Terez said:

Jahna Frantziskonis (boy, does auto-correct hate her name) was great fun as one of the lead "blues" - strutting and showing attitude. I was surprised to discover that James Sofranko was the "blue" equivalent - with their swim caps and goggle sunglasses, you didn't really know who was who. 

My other complaint here was that it became a little preachy and heavy-handed, kind of like a Tele-Tubbies episode, all that pink and blue and unambiguous "we shouldn't ostracize people who are different or think differently". My sense is that less would have been more, and I almost wanted more abstraction, so that the dancing, the dancers' body language, told the story.

....

but it was David Dawson's Anima Animus that really dazzled me. Such good dancing - I wanted to name every ensemble dancer in my review, but with an 800 word limit, that couldn't happen.

Lots of good here, but just had to giggle at your comment about Jahna F -- that was a real challenge for me when she was at Pacific Northwest Ballet.

I haven't seen this work, and so cannot speak directly to the construction, but in general, we really seem to be headed towards a period where dances have to be "about" something.  This isn't a bad thing on its face, but it does take a certain kind of craft to make a work communicate an abstract idea or concept.  I'm curious to see how this trend develops...

I envy you seeing the Dawson -- he makes such incredible kinetic material for his dancers.

Share this post


Link to post
On 4/24/2018 at 1:42 PM, Terez said:

Wow, did it bother me that Alastair Macaulay named the wrong dancer in his review. 

Charity, Terez. :) It happens to the best and the very best, as when Edwin Denby once confused Nora Kaye and Markova and wrote a (positive) review of the wrong ballerina. 

Share this post


Link to post
14 hours ago, dirac said:

Charity, Terez. :) It happens to the best and the very best, as when Edwin Denby once confused Nora Kaye and Markova and wrote a (positive) review of the wrong ballerina. 

Oh, OUCH. But you're right, it's part of the game. How many performances do you suppose Macaulay attends each year/season? I would, however, like to shout out and/or reiterate that Joseph Wharton performed in Program A and it sounds like he did a fine job. Kudos to Wharton!

Share this post


Link to post
1 hour ago, Terez said:

[Review info moved]

I'm attending the matinee tomorrow (Saturday) for Program D. Anyone else going to this program, or saw the Thurs night performance? I'm looking forward to it.

Hi Terez - the admins will no doubt move your post to the Writings on Ballet section. We have a thread there titled, Discussion of UNBOUND Reviews:

http://balletalert.invisionzone.com/topic/43718-discussion-of-unbound-reviews/?tab=comments#comment-399181

 

Share this post


Link to post
Posted (edited)

Fun with Arthur Pita's Bjork Ballet

 

30922149_1399195810226240_19980436711397

31218745_101839810684457_194615359425635

Edited by pherank

Share this post


Link to post

Rebecca King Ferraro and Michael Breeden interviewed Myles Thatcher, Sylvie Rood, and Kersh Branz with live audience for their podcast "Conversations on Dance":
https://conversationsondancepod.com/2018/04/26/bonus-myles-thatcher-live-from-san-francisco-ballets-unbound-festival/

They also interviewed Annabelle Lopez Ochoa:

https://conversationsondancepod.com/2018/04/30/annabelle-lopez-ochoa/

From that post:

Quote

We are back from San Francisco where we recorded a massive 26 episodes that are waiting to be published on your feed.  We chatted with world class choreographers about their careers and work including Christopher Wheeldon, Stanton Welch, and Edwaard Liang, ballet master Katita Waldo, as well as some of the remarkable dancers of San Francisco Ballet, like Sarah Van Patten, Ana Sophia Scheller, and Sofiane Sylve. 

Wow, wow, wow!

Share this post


Link to post
14 minutes ago, Helene said:

Rebecca King Ferraro and Michael Breeden interviewed Myles Thatcher, Sylvie Rood, and Kersh Branz with live audience for their podcast "Conversations on Dance":
https://conversationsondancepod.com/2018/04/26/bonus-myles-thatcher-live-from-san-francisco-ballets-unbound-festival/

They also interviewed Annabelle Lopez Ochoa:

https://conversationsondancepod.com/2018/04/30/annabelle-lopez-ochoa/

We're about to be buried under a pile o' conversations.  ;)

It was a good idea to have Ferraro and Breeden come to SF to record the podcasts, but the funny thing is, I don't think anyone mentioned that this was going to happen.

Share this post


Link to post
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×