Amy

Ratmansky's Swan Lake at La Scala

54 posts in this topic

6 hours ago, cubanmiamiboy said:

What I find amusing is that EVEN 32 singles-(as with the posted clip)- are quite a hard task for the ballerina if the conductor goes with the appropriate speed-(which is the case in the clip). I have the feeling that dancing scores have had a tendency to go slower as years passed, to make room for more refined poses...better, more refined body positions...placement correctness etc. Sometimes we see midcentury dancers dancing somewhat sloppier, but definitely faster and in most cases- (IN MY OWN OPINION)- way more exciting. If Legnani and Kshessinskaya were able to really achieve this 32 fouettes to the original music speed and back when pointe shoes were not even close to our modern day bricks, then well....it is quite a marvel, even more considering the struggle we see our modern ballerinas have with said sequence. 

Nina Ananiashvili says what struggle? ;)

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Posted (edited)

6 hours ago, aurora said:

Nina Ananiashvili says what struggle? ;)

 

I saw her dance a Swan Lake during her second to last season with ABT in which she struggled with the fouettes -- atypical? I suppose so. I had only seen her dance the role one other time--a few years earlier--and there were no such issues. However I did find other aspects of the later performance admirable.

 

 

 

Edited by Drew

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11 hours ago, aurora said:

Nina Ananiashvili says what struggle? ;)

 

Oh...well...that's Nina, for Christ sake. In a league of her own, of course..✊✊✊❤❤❤

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Now that I've seen all three casts, a few more details:

 

For the Orange County performances of Giselle, the Saturday matinee cast July 29 is Nicoletta Manni and Claudio Covielo. She was Odette at the premiere Amy discussed and I saw her Saturday night. I'd certainly recommend seeing that performance in OC. I saw him last night as Siegfried. Not as impressive as others this week, but worth seeing. The men in this company are very strong, and it made me wonder what it must be like working in the shadow of Roberto Bolle. It seems to have inspired them. If McKenzie is looking for tall male principals, this would be a good place to look and they're probably cheaper than Bolle!

 

I remain so impressed with the choreography for the corps, especially in Act I, and both white acts. So many interesting formations and steps I don't recall seeing before. I have been wondering what happened over the past century. It's as though the importance of the corps declined somewhat (even though the corps is always important in Swan Lake) and the importance of pyrotechnics for the principals gained in prominence. 

 

It also seemed to me that Balanchine must have gotten inspiration from this production of Swan Lake in his youth, along with the many inspirations we know about. Often the corps is in formation framing the principals - but with their own patterns and steps. It reminded me of the three-sided frame of the corps in the last movement of Symphony in C, when the corps is doing interesting little things on their own (like that amazing tendu sequence that Goldner discusses in detail). And this is yet another production using students, which we know Balanchine liked to incorporate in many of his ballets. Has anyone seen a production of SL that uses eight young students in the first lakeside scene, as this one does?

 

In the bad manners department, I was amazed at how often flash cameras went off during the performances, mainly from the boxes. I guess it's difficult for the ushers to spot the culprits, given the design of the theater. I've also seen flashes going off in the Royal Opera House in London - bad manners are not limited to the US.

 

I was disappointed that the 10Euro souvenir program was almost entirely in Italian, with just a couple of pages in English. (The principal casting was on a free hand-out.) At least in some European theaters, the text in the program is in several languages, especially English, given the dominance of that language now throughout the EU.

 

The seating recommendations others on this site gave were spot on! The best seating is in the tiers -- I'd suggest 2-3-4 -- in the center areas. The first row is terrific, with little chairs. The second and third rows are actually backless stools of varying heights. Yuk. 

 

I remain hopeful that this will be taped and released on DVD someday -- if not La Scala, perhaps Zurich! It would be nice to see some North American productions rethink their use of the corps throughout.

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