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cubanmiamiboy

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Everything posted by cubanmiamiboy

  1. They can't certainly be proven, I give you that. I just hope the world could really "see" and act sometimes beyond the evidence-based criteria so necessary help-(many times not asked for)- could be offered. But you are totally right. There is not proof whatsoever that Johnsey has any conflict, as the legal terminology goes, "beyond reasonable doubt".
  2. My subjective perception of Johnsey comes from my experience working in a sex reassignment surgery floor-(one of the very few in this country)- for four years. Gender dysphoria is quite a 7 heads monster that definitely stays out of public vision.
  3. cubanmiamiboy

    1966 NYCB's "Midsummer.." film.

    I am just watching this from the endless and marvelous collection of John Clifford channel. Oh my....what a magnificent production, sets and costumes. And then....Allegra...once again mesmerizing me. This is definitely NOT what I saw down here. Here it was bare and...just forgettable. Is this ballet presented with this opulence in its current production at City Ballet..?
  4. Let's agree to disagree then on how "ok" and "healthy" this whole affair is. I happen to usually try to dig into the "hear no evil, see no evil" aspect of things, and experience has told me that things is are not just fine in sensitive issues in which people generally don't want to look beyond the happy surface-( and even more if it involves political correctness). If you think, or assume that Johnsey has no identity crisis , or his 20 pounds weight loss in order to fit a ballet female corps while being structurally different as a male is very healthy, well....that's your assumption-(agreeing upon not knowing what his real story is). Mine, on the other side, is just the opposite
  5. Ok....so I voiced an unfathomable wrong guess, completely unlikely to even be slightly considered a probable fact. Got it.🤗
  6. Early into the topic I read that he was told by the Trocks that if he transitioned he would no longer be able to dance with them. That's why I assumed he was talking about surgery. But of course...I could be wrong. And I could also be wrong at pointing at the probable negative impact severe weight loss as a means to fit into the mold required by the ENB corps could potentially carry. Every might be just fine, and I hope it is.
  7. cubanmiamiboy

    "Harlequinade" 2018.

    Are you all ready...?🤗😍
  8. Jhonsey speaks at some point about transitioning. As we don't know to which extent this goes, I will be liberal and guess that he was talking about having surgery . For a man to have a cost covered elective castration and penectomy, he must bring a diagnosis of "gender dysphoria" given by two different psychiatrists to the surgeon. And gender dysphoria certainly involves identity crisis. As per dangerous self inflicted weight loss in order to blend into the rigid ballet physical standards, well... that's more than well documented out there.
  9. I find really interesting that, in the era of bulimia/anorexia exposure , nobody seems to frown upon the drastic weight loss statement. 20 pounds drop for such a small male frame seems a bit extreme to me. But I guess we ought to be applauding instead. Oh well...to each its own I guess. Ballet....extreme goals....extreme weight loss....identity crisis....plastic surgery. Hey Gelsey..
  10. cubanmiamiboy

    "Harlequinade" 2018.

    Did anybody found a bit stressful how the little harlequins have to quickly gather all the money from the floor into the rug to clear the stage for the dancing to come...? Did anybody found a bit stressful how the little harlequins have to quickly gather all the money from the floor into the rug to clear the stage for the dancing to come...?
  11. cubanmiamiboy

    The Lilac Fairy

    Doug..you are THE ultimate source when discussions about notations and variations are in place.🤗. But I would assume that the main sources for the accountability of M. Petipa's extent of her dancing the Lilac prologue variation are those of E.Gerdt and Mme. Egorova's accounts. My wild guess is that she stopped performing it at some point and that it resurfaced when Egorova danced the role. About Lopukhov being its author that is quite a mistery. Maybe that is the second variation you talk about exist in the collection.
  12. cubanmiamiboy

    "Harlequinade" 2018.

    All in all, I strongly believe this is a ballet that won't have a strong impact for generations to come, both for audiences and for dancers. Reconstruction of the Imperial Petipa legacy is the "it" thing right now, and I agree it is a wonderful thing. We're getting to know full scores...opulent costume designs that had all but disappeared after the Soviets...and even better, combinations of steps and whole dancing pas and sequences that have been carefully re crafted to give us a wider idea of the work of the French master. But...I also believe modern audiences response to the surviving pre-reconstructions classics has much to do with the dramatic weight that they all somehow carry. Many moons later we still debate over characterizations of Giselle, Odette, Raymonda and Swannilda-(even being Coppelia a light ballet). Even the most dramatically weakest of them all-(Raymonda and Corsaire)- have quite a bit or story for us to ruminate and discuss. There's really nothing in Harlequinade. Only some combinations of allegro steps-(wonderful ones)- opulent costumes and a bubbly score, which can never be seated next to Tchaikovsky, Delibes or even Glazunov. I am happy I made it for this premiere, but I wouldn't arrange to travel in the future to see a whole run of it again.
  13. cubanmiamiboy

    "Harlequinade" 2018.

    Pierrette should loan her second act dress to Aurora for her wedding...😎
  14. cubanmiamiboy

    "Harlequinade" 2018.

    Raymonda
  15. cubanmiamiboy

    "Harlequinade" 2018.

    They also share a great deal of full head of hair!
  16. cubanmiamiboy

    "Harlequinade" 2018.

    I think the ballet success at the time is intertwined with how its very first consumers-(the Imperial family)- amused themselves in such sort of things like masquerades, balls and the like. This ballet feels very "aristocratic"-(something we won't ever come close to feel identified with)-and probably very comical in a turn of the century way. Our modern comedy today is much darker and elaborated. When all this elements of identification are no more, what we are left with is a curiosity, which might contain nice dancing sections. But not much else.
  17. cubanmiamiboy

    "Harlequinade" 2018.

    And to be honest, even as adorable as the Waltz of the Hours is with those girls in pink, I much prefer to see it in a more elaborated, for-adults choreography-(as with the Bolshoi recon)
  18. cubanmiamiboy

    "Harlequinade" 2018.

    Oh...and on another matters, I get into the orchestra section very early, and right then and there are Villella and his wife seated quietly. So I pulled up a beautiful pic of him as Harlequin with McBride, and when passing by I put it right next to him and call his attention. I go.."here, Eddie...this is THE REAL DEAL!" He started laughing and Linda grabbed my phone and goes.."awwww" looking at the pic. I took the moment to thank him for having left such a great and strong ballet legacy in Miami-(he seemed moved by this). He did shake my hand and muttered a very honest "thank you". Then I left. By then people were literally jumping on him already-(and on Baryshnikov, who happened to be seated right at the other side of Villella).
  19. cubanmiamiboy

    "Harlequinade" 2018.

    So this is the deal. Harlequinade is yet another attempt at reclaiming a ballet world many of us thought to be lost. Much back and forth has been said about the pros and cons of said reconstructions or recreations...the sense or not at attempting them, or the success or lack of it of the end result. Harlequinade belongs in a more difficult cluster for Imperial productions to be revived, and it is the simple fact of being a very light comedy. Cutting it short...the libretto is probably the weakest of all Petipa ballets that are currently on repertoire. Even the most criticized ones on this board, Raymonda and Corsaire, look way meatier than Harlequinade. And comedies...? Well, we have La Fille Mal Gardee-(which had its triumphant return to the mid twenty century thanks to the beautiful Ashton choreography)- and then Coppelia, which is a whole different animal due to its memorable music...and then probably Balanchine. Yes...the production is sumptuous....the costumes to die for, and most of all we see lots of allegro footwork and combinations that are not usually the bread and butter of the Soviet treatment of the warhorses at the turn of the century. Among the dances, the ones that I remember the most are of course the second act pdd with those sautees on pointe for Columbine's variation and the batteries for Harlequin. The waltz number for the Larks was also very pretty. The kids section I am a bit partial. I found it too long. Last night's cast was stronger than tonight's. Boylston nailed the choreography and steps way more secure than Lane who, tragically, took a nasty fall onstage, which was somewhat concealed for it happened right behind an umbrella that a kid holds open center stage. Hers wasn't the only fall. A girl in black also fell forward during a group routine, and then when trying to get up she was dragged, I believed as a part of the choreography, by her partner holding to her skirt, to which she fell once again. It was quite messy. Cirio's lifts looked really labored and stressful. Generally speaking, performance tonight was underwhelming compared to last night's. Lane/Cirio-Abrera/Hallberg weren't really a match for Boylston/Whiteside-Murphy. Oh...and Murphy was WONDERFUL last night. She really lighten the role. Ana Kisselgoff was seated next to me and she looked bored.
  20. cubanmiamiboy

    "Harlequinade" 2018.

    Well....the choreo calls for the boys to drag the girls by their dress while both are running backwards. The boy apparently was trying to follow somehow on the steps even though the girl was still on the floor, so she couldn't keep her balance-(due to the dragging)- when trying to get up and then fell back for the second time.
  21. cubanmiamiboy

    "Harlequinade" 2018.

    Yes! I just realized about it tonight, when they repeated the stunt. Tonight was even more violent.
  22. cubanmiamiboy

    Mariinsky's Raymonda To the KC in Feb 2016

    Laurent...if you go back a bit on this thread, you will see why I came back to mention this fact. When the Mariinsky came to DC, this section was much discussed, for which some ballerinas obviously did not do the difficult entrechats on pointe, but rather changements. It was interesting to see that they have been quite following into the footsteps of their venerable originals.🤗
  23. cubanmiamiboy

    "Harlequinade" 2018.

    In a little note...I hope they somehow fixed the dummy of Harlequin for tonight. They ripped off one of his legs, and I don't think it was intentional...😂
  24. cubanmiamiboy

    The Lilac Fairy

    Accounts on the mistery of Marie Petipa and her dancing in SB are as many as contradictory. For instance, Elizaveta Gerdt, the daughter of Pavel Gerdt, says that by the time she appeared as a child in the production with Petipa as Lilac, the variation had been dropped from the ballet because Marie just couldn't dance it, and by the time she herself danced the role, she had to ask Egorova to teach it to her, because she, as one of the last Tsarist Lilacs, had reinstitute the variation. If I remember correctly, Egorova then danced to a variation created by F. Lopukhov. Also, different accounts appear on the steps both Karsavina and Pavlova danced when it was their turn to debut in the role by 1904 which, if I remember correctly, none included the famous variation we know today. Meaning that apparently at some point in the performance history of the ballet this variation, having been danced exclusively by Marie, had been apparently dropped... but with the rest of the character scenes still retained by Petipa's daughter.
  25. I understand what you mean, and I knew someone would notice-(I referred to the issue in a post above). This has to do with the way Alonso and her regisseurs want the ballet, which is essentially the way she remembers it, and the stiffness that you notice is exactly the opposite as the certain freedom of movement and interpretation you are used to see in modern ballerinas , particularly in performers like Osipova. The performances of CNB, particularly Giselle, are plagued by the most fierce ostracism you can imagine. Not one gesture can be added..not one different arm position can be attempted. Alicia wants a carbon copy of a 1948 performance, and that's how Giselle has come. Now... for some, this could pose an interesting, curious point of comparison.
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