Jump to content


This site uses cookies. By using this site, you agree to accept cookies, unless you've opted out. (US government web page with instructions to opt out: http://www.usa.gov/optout-instructions.shtml)

"Born to Be Wild"


  • Please log in to reply
70 replies to this topic

#61 Alexandra

Alexandra

    Board Founder

  • Administrators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 9,279 posts

Posted 12 February 2003 - 08:07 AM

vrsfanatic, thank you for raising those points -- that there have been find male dancers with ABT before (going back to Erik Bruhn it the 1960s, and with the possible exception of Malakhov, none of the current young men equals that standard, IMO) AND questioning Morris's comment about the steps being new. Good grief!

#62 vrsfanatic

vrsfanatic

    Silver Circle

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 673 posts

Posted 12 February 2003 - 05:08 PM

Oh Alexandra, how could I forget Eric Bruhn. What a numbskull I am. Thanks for the glorious recollection!:)

#63 puppytreats

puppytreats

    Gold Circle

  • Inactive Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 751 posts

Posted 25 May 2011 - 06:49 PM

I am addressing this topic because just watched this program today. I agree with most of the comments already posted about it. I have a few comments and questions.

1. Malakov:

I have not yet seen "Le Corsaire." Do all dancer land on a deep plie or is this unusual to Malakov?

My Russian pup has the same nickname (diff. sp.) as Malakov. Extra puppy treats tonight!


2. Carreno:

This was the second interview I have seen with him, and I am so impressed by his dancing, as well as how sweet he is.


3. Stiefel:

Was Gillian Murphy the woman with straight hair on the red carpet with him? If it was her, she looked terrific.

I was very embarassed by the marketing of the four dancers, generally, and Stiefel, in particular. When I saw "Center Stage," I disliked his character, but told myself that the movie was a piece of fiction. Of course, I enjoyed his dancing. However, this program tried to portray him like his movie character. I felt like I was watching the "Simpsons" cartoon episode, in which a producer is casting the "bad, cool boy" character for a four piece boy band. The marketing was heavy handed and insulting. (See below)

4. Corella:

He was on Sesame Street -- that is so much better p.r., and so much more cool. I can't help it - I love Cookie Monster and Oscar.

Corella's dancing is delightful. Just looking at his eyes could evoke tears.

His Russian dance as a child was remarkable.

Is there a left and right handedness in turning? I believe Corella's spins were in a different direction than the other dancers.

5. McKenzie:

I could not understand why his shirt was unbuttoned so far down, but then I read the comments above. The loud music, the title, the harley doo-rag, all left me needing a shower. Is something like that ever effective?

6. Alonso:

The photograph of her, in her youth, was the most beautiful aspect of the program. Her eyes were stunning.
I enjoyed her evident pride in Correno.

7. Morris:

Critics in newspapers always feel the need to comment on MM's lack of beauty as well as his oddness. I was, therefore, surprised to see how nice his eyes were, as well as how down to earth he seemed.

8. D'Amboise:

When I looked at the screen, I saw a prince. When I turned away, I heard the voices of my great uncles and cousins from Brooklyn and the Bronx. Then, Morris remarked that dancers should dance, not speak. Was he really speaking to those of us who were born in the Outer Boroughs, and not his remarkable four dancers? I still cannot shake this accent, so maybe I should have been given dance lessons from my youth...


In sum, I enjoyed the movie, and learned a lot, but not enough. I feel so greedy, but I want more.

#64 Marga

Marga

    Platinum Circle

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,022 posts

Posted 26 May 2011 - 03:10 PM

I have yet to see this movie, so will go straight to answering one of your questions:

Is there a left and right handedness in turning? I believe Corella's spins were in a different direction than the other dancers.

Definitely! It's always interesting to discover which dancers turn better to the left.

Your comments are very enjoyable to read, puppytreats! I, too, have a brother and cousins who speak Noo Yawk, my brother 'Lawn Guyland' and my twin male cousins a Queens dialect. I stipulate because, contrary to certain studies which refute the differences, those of us from NYC know a Brooklyn accent is not the same as a Long Island accent, a Bronx accent is different from a Queens, and so on. The differences the ear perceives may be due to ethnic influences as well, of course.

I LOVE hearing Jacques d'Amboise speak! It makes me feel so at home. He was born in Massachusetts but grew up in upper Manhattan - Washington Heights - a tough neighbourhood at the time, where talking tough helped one survive! (Eddie Villella grew up similarly in Bayside, Queens, and his New York accent is a little different, perhaps because of the Italian influence of his parents.)

As for Malakhov's deep pliť, I have not seen many other dancers do it like he does. I've seen the video of his Lankendam and find its remarkable pliancy unique. He was 31 years old at the time and I wonder how long he was able to do it (I mean until what age!)

#65 4mrdncr

4mrdncr

    Silver Circle

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 670 posts

Posted 26 May 2011 - 07:26 PM

Ah, yes, Judy Kinberg did produce all those Great Performance and Dance in America shows in the seventies and eighties, but the real genius of how to film dance, Emile Ardolino, is no longer with us, and so, while Judy is no slouch, the great center of the process is gone, from a motion-recording standpoint. Of course, we all know that the actual center of a program about dance is the dance, but that's what Emile recorded, with great accuracy and élan.

YES! YES! YES! Producers pull together a project and push it to completion, but the director actually makes it. I was very sad when Mr. Ardolino passed away.

#66 4mrdncr

4mrdncr

    Silver Circle

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 670 posts

Posted 26 May 2011 - 08:07 PM

I am addressing this topic because just watched this program today. I agree with most of the comments already posted about it. I have a few comments and questions.
. . .

4. Corella:

Is there a left and right handedness in turning? I believe Corella's spins were in a different direction than the other dancers.
. . .

In sum, I enjoyed the movie, and learned a lot, but not enough. I feel so greedy, but I want more.


Angel Corella is right-handed, but turns left. (The rest of us usually turn better on the same side as our stronger hand.)

#67 Marga

Marga

    Platinum Circle

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,022 posts

Posted 26 May 2011 - 09:03 PM

Thanks for that bit of info. I didn't know which hand Corella wrote with, so couldn't insert that point of interest! It's what makes the choice of side for turning even more intriguing, that it doesn't (always) have to do with one's handedness!

#68 aurora

aurora

    Silver Circle

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 706 posts

Posted 26 May 2011 - 09:52 PM

Thanks for that bit of info. I didn't know which hand Corella wrote with, so couldn't insert that point of interest! It's what makes the choice of side for turning even more intriguing, that it doesn't (always) have to do with one's handedness!


Is there such a strong general corrolation between turning direction and handedness?

It is true that most people are right-handed and most people are right-turners. But I'm not sure that most left-turners are left-handed.

I know that (like Angel Corella) I'm not :)

#69 puppytreats

puppytreats

    Gold Circle

  • Inactive Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 751 posts

Posted 27 May 2011 - 10:56 AM

Marga,
Thanks! I don't know how anyone could confuse a LongIsland accent for anything else (I have done my stints in the Bronx, LI, and Queens), but I think the prior two generations, from Da Bronx and Brooklyn, have had the most influence on my speech patterns. Comparing the words, "four" and "water", as spoken by my AZ relatives and me, has always been endlessly amusing.

4mrdncr,
I write with my left hand but cut with my right. I can't wait to find out how I will pirouette (but I am far from that point, still).

#70 4mrdncr

4mrdncr

    Silver Circle

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 670 posts

Posted 27 May 2011 - 08:19 PM

Just a BTW: I'm right-handed and used to turn better on the right, but I remember prepping differently for each when I had to do turns in a specific direction. On the right I was more concerned with technique and placement (a 'left-brain' approach), whereas on the left I used to try NOT to think about the "how" and just kind of instinctively do it (ie. a more 'right-brain approach). I remember being very happy as a young dancer when I could nail doubles on the left without thinking, but never thought my triples were as good as those on the right. BTW: I also had better control on the right, but better balance on the left. (Don't know how normal--or not--any of this is.) These days I'm just happy if I can still 'spot' correctly without resorting to my tri-focal contact lenses.
PS. I don't think Angel was aware of any connection between 'handedness' and turning aptitude when I asked him about it some years ago. He told me he started turning left at a young age, but not that it was necessarily an unconscious choice.

#71 angelica

angelica

    Silver Circle

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 500 posts

Posted 29 May 2011 - 03:17 PM

I've been thinking a great deal about this right-turn, left-turn thing lately, as I try to achieve perfect pirouettes. At the ripe old age of 100 (well, you know), I'll take perfect singles, maybe an occasional double on a good day. I'm right-handed, but I pirouette better en dehors to the left and better en dedans to the right. I do pique turns better to the right. I've been under the impression that that's because my right leg is stronger than my left, and so I can pull up onto it more easily and it holds me more securely. When I see dancers who turn to the left, I've wondered whether that's because their right legs are stronger than their left legs. Any thoughts?


0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users


Help support Ballet Alert! and Ballet Talk for Dancers year round by using this search box for your amazon.com purchases (adblockers may block display):