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The Last Act


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#31 rg

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Posted 27 January 2013 - 02:59 PM

until Natalia Makarova's 1980 production for American Ballet Theater, more or less, all productions of LA BAYADERE since the 1920s ended w/the Shades sc.
since 1980 some have tried to recapture the long last final act. Grigorovich added a little destruction of the temple finale to his staging in recent years.
but, except for the 'reconstruction' of the 1899-ish version for the Kirov by Vikharev, Soviet/Russian productions have opted to end the ballet with the Shades.

#32 ascballerina

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Posted 27 January 2013 - 03:01 PM

Ok, thanks, rg. I had previously seen the Royal Ballet version with Darcy Bussell as Gamzatti, and there's the full-scale destruction there, so I was a bit confused when I didn't see it today....

#33 Amy

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Posted 14 July 2014 - 09:14 AM

Does anybody know much about the original apotheosis for the the final act of La Bayadere?

 

It's just because after hearing something that Doug Fullington said - he said that Solor and Nikiya are reunited, flying through the rain above the Himalayas - did he actually mean that they're meant to be flying away on wires or was the stage given effects to make it look like it was raining and they were flying through it?

 

So yeah, that description really got me curious... lol



#34 rg

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Posted 14 July 2014 - 10:15 AM

Wiley's translation of the 1877 libretto for LA BAYADERE reads: "Apotheosis: Through the rain, the peaks of the Himalayas are visible. Nikia's shade glides through the air; she is triumphant, and tenderly looks at her beloved Solo, who is at her feet."

descriptions of just how, or if, the staging itself worked to depict this scene don't seem readily available in English, or perhaps even in Russian, for that matter.



#35 Amy

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Posted 14 July 2014 - 10:33 AM

Wiley's translation of the 1877 libretto for LA BAYADERE reads: "Apotheosis: Through the rain, the peaks of the Himalayas are visible. Nikia's shade glides through the air; she is triumphant, and tenderly looks at her beloved Solo, who is at her feet."

descriptions of just how, or if, the staging itself worked to depict this scene don't seem readily available in English, or perhaps even in Russian, for that matter.

Ah right, thanks very much; it would be wonderful to see that restored. Shame Vikharev didn't restore it in his reconstruction.



#36 Amy

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Posted 14 July 2014 - 10:42 AM

Actually something else I forgot to ask, does Wiley's translation of the 1877 or 1900 libretto mention anything about the fakir giving Gamzatti a basket of flowers during the Grand Adagio and she throws it back to him? If so, any idea what that's supposed to mean?

 

And also, is it true that sometime after the première of the 1900 revival, a new variation for Nikiya in the Grand Adagio was composed and choreographed for Mathilde Kschessinskaya?



#37 rg

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Posted 14 July 2014 - 11:57 AM

Wiley has an introductory entry on LA BAYADERE, same same study that includes the full libretto, in his translation, in A CENTURY OF RUSSIAN BALLET, DOCUMENTS AND EYEWITNESS ACCOUNTS, 1810-1910 (Oxford, 1990).



#38 Amy

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Posted 14 July 2014 - 12:11 PM

Wiley has an introductory entry on LA BAYADERE, same same study that includes the full libretto, in his translation, in A CENTURY OF RUSSIAN BALLET, DOCUMENTS AND EYEWITNESS ACCOUNTS, 1810-1910 (Oxford, 1990).

Ah thank you very much - I'm a wannabe ballet historian and I'm already aiming to buy Wiley's book Tchaikovsky's Ballets, but thank you, this is another book for my shelf. smile.png




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