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#196 pherank

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Posted 21 June 2013 - 08:56 PM

Though obviously not a public speaker, Baryshnikov says some lovely things in this address.



#197 Helene

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Posted 21 June 2013 - 09:06 PM

It's like the sophisticated cousin to "Perfect is the enemy of good."



#198 pherank

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Posted 24 June 2013 - 12:18 PM

“He who hears not the music thinks the dancer mad.”
—African proverb



#199 pherank

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Posted 01 July 2013 - 11:16 PM

"La Danse, c'est une question morale."

 

Taken from Lincoln Kirstein's Beliefs of a Master:

http://www.nybooks.c...pagination=true

 

Odd parents, a few very odd, commenced bringing children—mostly girls, too tall, short, or plump—to be auditioned by this young ballet master, who, not yet known to America, had already been interviewed by the dance critic of The New York Times. One woman asked him, after he’d inspected her daughter in practice class, “Will she dance?” What she meant was, “Do you think she is beautiful and talented, as a child, and will she be a star?” A middle-class American mother was seeking a prognosis, as from an allergist about her child’s rash. The putative ballerina clung to Mummy’s skirt, exhibiting filial attachment worthy of Shirley Temple. Balanchine was unassertive, slim, no longer boyish, and, with his grave, alert mannerliness, the more daunting in his authority, instinctive and absolute. He hesitated, perhaps to make sure he would be understood; she repeated her question, “Will my daughter dance?” A Delphic response was the reply she received, sounding more oracular couched in French, although the sound of its meaning was plain enough through its four transparent cognates: “La Danse, Madame, c’est une question morale.”


#200 Amy Reusch

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Posted 05 July 2013 - 09:11 PM

Last line in Marina Harss' interview of Edward Villella:


Do you miss dancing?

[His eyes light up, and he nods, with a roguish smile.] I’m looking for the devil’s 800 number.
 


http://dancetabs.com...mi-city-ballet/

#201 pherank

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Posted 12 July 2013 - 08:50 PM

I like flaws and feel more comfortable around people who have them. I myself am made entirely of flaws, stitched together with good intentions.
--Augusten Burroughs
(found on Vanessa Zahorian's Facebook site)



#202 bart

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Posted 26 September 2013 - 04:06 AM

.... and yet who ever knows any Balanchine ballet?

 

Context:  Alastair Macaulay review, NYTimes, 9/26/13:  "Amid a fall dance season richly packed with significant events cross the New York dance map, a single program at New York City Ballet stands out like a summit.  All four of its items are by George Balnchine, and all are well known -- and yet who ever knows any Balanchine ballet?



#203 pherank

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Posted 16 October 2013 - 06:20 PM

"I can see in the Soviet style an extension of the way I was trained, but I think what happened here in ballet in our century is much more interesting than what happened there…Somehow, in Russia, ballet has become the exhibition of dancing. Soviet dancers no longer want to show the story or the mood so much as they want to show their technique -- this one can turn three times in the air, lifting both his legs, and that one can do something else. But it‘s no longer expression; it‘s exhibitionism."

-- Alexandera Danilova, 1988



#204 diane

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Posted 18 October 2013 - 03:29 AM

 

 

"...ballet has become the exhibition of dancing. Soviet dancers no longer want to show the story or the mood so much as they want to show their technique -- this one can turn three times in the air, lifting both his legs, and that one can do something else. But it‘s no longer expression; it‘s exhibitionism."

 

Nice one! This appears to me to be the case for many in the west, now, too. 

 

-d-



#205 DanielBenton

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Posted 18 October 2013 - 05:28 AM

Erick Hawkins once said (to paraphrase him):   "If all you're doing is self- expressing, then you might as well just get off the stage".



#206 sandik

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Posted 18 October 2013 - 09:46 AM

What a pleasure to think about Hawkins!



#207 pherank

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Posted 18 October 2013 - 04:54 PM

From Mindy Aloff's Dance Anecdotes, another one about Danilova:

 

(On the passing of Balanchine)
Karin von Aroldingen was perhaps his greatest comfort: she attended him devotedly and even at his lowest moments he always recognized her step in the corridor before she entered his room. Barbara Horgan speaks particularly of Maria and Choura. Maria was more outwardly upset than anyone, “near hysteria” each time she left his room and always in tears when she telephoned from Chicago. But Danilova was the most affecting of all. She came only once to the hospital, and when she left his room she said, “I won't come here again - I have said goodbye to him.” Watching her walk slowly away, Barbara Horgan felt a great sorrow for Choura, realizing that she was losing her oldest and dearest friend.
- Moira Shearer

 

[For those that don't know: when Danilova passed away in 1997, she was buried at Oakland Cemetery, Sag Harbor NY near the grave of George Balanchine]

 

During an interview with a group of American dance critics who traveled to the Soviet Union in 1983, the late Russian dance historian Vera Krasovskaya recalled the first night of the New York City Ballet’s first appearance in St. Petersburg, in 1962:

"Balanchine opened in Serenade. And I thought how sorry I was that I had to stay for more ballets. I just wanted to walk along the Neva and think about all the beautiful things I’d seen."
-Aloff

 

[the Neva being the St. Petersburg area's iconic river]



#208 bart

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Posted 31 October 2013 - 05:40 AM

From Judith Flanders' review of the Royal Ballet's (Carlos Acosta's) new production of Don Quixote, in the Times:Literary Supplement.

 

Dance doesn't need moving scenery; dance is moving scenery.


#209 sandik

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Posted 31 October 2013 - 07:45 AM

Oh, that's nice and tight!



#210 pherank

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Posted 03 November 2013 - 12:24 PM

"Each art is only powerful in its own domain, and once it seeks to embody the principles of other art it is doomed to failure. The Eclecticism of the later phases of the Ballet is its greatest danger."

--Tamara Karsavina




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