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High extensions


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Poll: High extensions (98 member(s) have cast votes)

High extensions

  1. YES!! The higher, the better. (16 votes [8.99%])

    Percentage of vote: 8.99%

  2. In some ballets, but not in others. (130 votes [73.03%])

    Percentage of vote: 73.03%

  3. Don't care one way or the other. (3 votes [1.69%])

    Percentage of vote: 1.69%

  4. UGH!! Ballet is *not* for contortionists. (29 votes [16.29%])

    Percentage of vote: 16.29%

Vote

#46 chiapuris

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Posted 07 March 2006 - 06:59 AM

-- the “Rose Adagio” attitude NEEDS to be 90/90/90, and not higher; it's MORE beautiful, and more mysterious, and more sovereign, if it's rotated to the max than it can be if it's lifted to the max.



Paul, I fully concur with your eloquent expression of why extension(s) applied willfully (on the belief that more is better) become sometimes a wrong artistic decision.

Recent viewings of the Kirov's SB Rose Adagio had budding ballerinas using extensions in a way that diminished the three-dimensionality of the rotating attitude--which seems to be the point of Petipa's choreography.

I look forward to reading more of your thoughts.

#47 Gina Ness

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Posted 08 March 2006 - 12:35 AM

My recent viewing of the Kirov's "Rose Adagio" had the ballerina's tutu flopping completely over her head on the "pique arabesque roll down penchees" down the diagonal with her princes....I've never seen anything so silly...

Edited by Gina Ness, 08 March 2006 - 12:35 AM.


#48 carbro

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Posted 14 June 2007 - 12:03 PM

I've noticed a few inverted tutus, too, too recently (although in which ballets -- or even whether ABT or NYCB [or both?] I can't quite recall), and not even in full penchees. You'd think the costume shops could tack some of the layers so that they'd retain their intended shape. Unnecessarily unflattering to both dancer and costume.

#49 zerbinetta

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Posted 28 June 2007 - 09:11 AM

I've noticed a few inverted tutus, too, too recently (although in which ballets -- or even whether ABT or NYCB [or both?] I can't quite recall), and not even in full penchees. You'd think the costume shops could tack some of the layers so that they'd retain their intended shape. Unnecessarily unflattering to both dancer and costume.


This is a very persistent post. Keeps cropping up in my New Posts.

#50 aurora

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Posted 28 June 2007 - 09:15 AM

This is a very persistent post. Keeps cropping up in my New Posts.


I noticed that too--I think what is happening is that every time anyone votes as a poll it ends up on the new post list, though there aren't any new *posts* per se

#51 dirac

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Posted 28 June 2007 - 09:42 AM

A reminder of the need to post when you vote, people. :blushing:

#52 aurora

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Posted 28 June 2007 - 10:02 AM

I find it interesting that the numbers in brackets (which I can only assume are the vote tallys for that answer) add up to way more than the "number of votes" listed below (currently 78)

whats up with that? Any ideas?

#53 bart

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Posted 28 June 2007 - 12:38 PM

A reminder of the need to post when you vote, people. :blushing:

So THAT explains it ... Thanks, dirac.

#54 carbro

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Posted 29 June 2007 - 11:22 AM

And someone just voted -- but didn't post. :clapping:

You, and only you, know who you are. Shame on you! :thumbsup:

#55 mjbelkin

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Posted 30 June 2007 - 11:48 PM

And someone just voted -- but didn't post. :)

You, and only you, know who you are. Shame on you! :unsure:


Yes, that was me, but maybe I felt that any comments I had to make had already been made, or maybe I felt to intimidated to post a comment.

I think that high extensions should only be used where the choreography can support them, and only when the dancer can perform them with ease - seeing a dancer stretch themselves to match fellow dancers' high extensions is never comfortable, and Sylvie Guillem can make them appear as easy as scratching your nose.

#56 leonid17

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Posted 01 July 2007 - 02:46 AM

And someone just voted -- but didn't post. :mad:

You, and only you, know who you are. Shame on you! :sweatingbullets:


Yes, that was me, but maybe I felt that any comments I had to make had already been made, or maybe I felt to intimidated to post a comment.

I think that high extensions should only be used where the choreography can support them, and only when the dancer can perform them with ease - seeing a dancer stretch themselves to match fellow dancers' high extensions is never comfortable, and Sylvie Guillem can make them appear as easy as scratching your nose.


Miss Guillem's ease, was the begining of the slippery slope. In 19th century ballets I believe they should never be used as they are inharmonious to the choreographic whole. I do however blame Artistic Directors who seem not to know the meaning of their title and that vulgar element of the audience that want to be entertained.
Yours po-facedly.

#57 mjbelkin

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Posted 01 July 2007 - 05:45 AM

Miss Guillem's ease, was the begining of the slippery slope. In 19th century ballets I believe they should never be used as they are inharmonious to the choreographic whole. I do however blame Artistic Directors who seem not to know the meaning of their title and that vulgar element of the audience that want to be entertained.
Yours po-facedly.


I'm guessing then that you have never actually watched her dance - she has near perfect technique and a great dramatic presence. In Manon, she displays great exuberance and playfulness at the start of the beginning, and slowly descends with the character into the miserable wretch who gets shipped to New Orleans.

It is a stunning performance that shows a great understand of Manon Lescaut, not just the choreography.

#58 Old Fashioned

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Posted 01 July 2007 - 08:02 AM

Miss Guillem's ease, was the begining of the slippery slope. In 19th century ballets I believe they should never be used as they are inharmonious to the choreographic whole. I do however blame Artistic Directors who seem not to know the meaning of their title and that vulgar element of the audience that want to be entertained.
Yours po-facedly.


I'm guessing then that you have never actually watched her dance - she has near perfect technique and a great dramatic presence. In Manon, she displays great exuberance and playfulness at the start of the beginning, and slowly descends with the character into the miserable wretch who gets shipped to New Orleans.

It is a stunning performance that shows a great understand of Manon Lescaut, not just the choreography.


But Manon is not a 19th century classic. :sweatingbullets:

#59 leonid17

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Posted 01 July 2007 - 10:53 AM

I'm guessing then that you have never actually watched her dance - she has near perfect technique and a great dramatic presence. In Manon, she displays great exuberance and playfulness at the start of the beginning, and slowly descends with the character into the miserable wretch who gets shipped to New Orleans.

It is a stunning performance that shows a great understand of Manon Lescaut, not just the choreography.

I saw Miss Guillem in every role she essayed with the Royal Ballet and IMHO she never met the interpretative standards met by her predecessors and often distorted the choreography.

#60 mjbelkin

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Posted 01 July 2007 - 12:37 PM

I'm guessing then that you have never actually watched her dance - she has near perfect technique and a great dramatic presence. In Manon, she displays great exuberance and playfulness at the start of the beginning, and slowly descends with the character into the miserable wretch who gets shipped to New Orleans.

It is a stunning performance that shows a great understand of Manon Lescaut, not just the choreography.

I saw Miss Guillem in every role she essayed with the Royal Ballet and IMHO she never met the interpretative standards met by her predecessors and often distorted the choreography.


Then we should just agree to disagree, after all, the world would be a pretty dull place if we all liked the same thing :sweatingbullets:


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