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Wednesday, March 15

8 posts in this topic

A review of the Sarasota Ballet by Anna Dearing for YourObserver.com.

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This was a pinnacle performance for Hulland and possibility one of the highlights of her career. She danced the role of the Young Girl with a newfound assurance in both technique and stage presence. She was delightful and funny as she teased Gomes in the first act, often mimicking the movements of a pigeon with the pecking of her head, arms flapping behind her back as wings and flitting of her hands. She was full of emotion and passion in the final pas de deux, when the Young Man (Gomes) returns to her with live pigeon on his shoulder.

 

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A review of Richmond Ballet by Julinda Lewis for The Richmond Times-Dispatch.

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This season also marks the 30th anniversary of ballet master Malcolm Burn, known for his lavish fairy tale ballets, like the recent “Midsummer Night’s Dream.” Studio Two, however, features one of Burn’s smaller works, the 2006 quartet, “A Tribute (to Marcel Marceau and Bip)." Performed on Tuesday by Valerie Tellmann-Henning, Thomas Ragland, Kirk Henning (all three of whom are retiring from the company after the upcoming New York season) along with Marty Davis, the work honors three incarnations of the late French mime artist.

 

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An interview with Ashley Bouder about the obstacles facing female choreographers in ballet.

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You need more than time to be bold and take risks — you also need a culture that gives you permission to do it. And Bouder says that boys in ballet are far more likely to get that than girls are. Because girls outnumber boys in ballet schools as well as in companies, she explains, they’re held to a higher disciplinary standard...............So, she says, “you have to be perfect, not only in class but in attitude and decorum and you have to fit in and be quiet. And the boys in some cases are allowed to just get away with murder ... but it doesn’t matter because they’re just trying to keep them in the class and keep them dancing, because you need boys to partner the girls.” This means more freedom outside of the studio, too. “And they’re allowed to be creative and they’re allowed to try things, and girls are not. They can just do whatever as long as they keep showing up.”

 

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A review of Project Polunin by Graham Watts for DanceTabs.

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It is also of interest because Maximova had a huge influence on the crafting of her role, as Aeola; and by far the best of this balletic time capsule, was Osipova’s mastery of the soft, flowing lines and plasticity of Maximova’s dance. Outside of this, the neoclassical choreography is notably unoriginal, being derivative of the artistically-constrained pipeline of mid-twentieth century Soviet ballet. Polunin and Osipova danced with athleticism and grace and their emotional connection was palpable but, as ballet, it was merely a pedestrian preservation steeped in Russian pickle.

 

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A review of San Francisco Ballet by Rita Felciano for danceviewtimes.

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 If ballet ever wants to make it big on Broadway, "Salome" would be a good candidate. It takes a well-known story, puts into it contemporary garb, commissions a theatrically effective score (Frank Moon) and embraces spectacle in every sense of that word. You give it a beautiful heroine/victim who shows what she has never been asked before -- dramatic power -- and you've got yourself a hit. If the art of choreography takes a secondary place, that's the price you may have to pay for a piece that on many levels is crude but also effective in doing out exactly what it wants to be: a bloody thriller.

 

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Reviews of Project Polunin

 

The Financial Times

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Now, after dark times and a return to the stage, he proposes a programme of works that marks his own renewed engagement with dance: “I’ve started to get joy from work again.” Would that I had felt the same about this ragbag of steps in which he stars with Natalia Osipova, and proposes an image of choreography of the most modish, self-regarding kind.

 

The Evening Standard

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What follows is folly. Nymphets in besparkled bodystockings frolic in poor-to-middling choreography; Polunin does more thrusting jumps to a soundtrack evoking sci-fi romance (by Ilan Eshkeri). As a portrait of shallowness it's very effective.

 

The Islington Gazette

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It’s a little self-indulgent you might gripe. But Polunin says he has once again started to find the joy in dance and so it’s easy to forgive him simply because it’s surely better for him to dance than not.

 

The Telegraph

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Last July, alongside with his real-life girlfriend – the similarly gifted Russian, Natalia Osipova – he starred in mixed bill that failed utterly to capitalise on their brilliance. But that evening now looks like a pinnacle of good judgment next to the new triple bill, Project Polunin, which skips from disappointing, to dismal, to desperate in three short hops.

 

The Upcoming

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But Project Polunin, founded in 2015 to bring together dancers, choreographers and artists from other fields, seems to represent a change of direction for the “bad boy of ballet” – a gradual shift from performer to curator, choreographer and all-round dance maker. One wonders whether the guise of the enfant terrible is slowly being discarded. While Icarus dreams of taking flight, perhaps Sergei Polunin is just finding his feet.

 

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A review of Sarasota Ballet by Mary Cargill for danceviewtimes.

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 Though tin is the official tenth year wedding gift, Webb's programing was pure gold, giving the audience the Sarasota Ballet's premiere of Ashton's 1948 "Scènes de Ballet"  and a revival of "The Two Pigeons", a work Webb presented in his first year.  Both of these works require strong male dancers and Ricardo Graziano's injury left a gap which was filled by a guest artist, Marcelo Gomes from the American Ballet Theatre, who danced two performances of "The Two Pigeons".  Guests can be problematic, as ABT's summer frequent flyer policy, now thankfully in abeyance, has shown, but Gomes' integrity and generosity let him fit seamlessly into the company.  On opening night, after being almost coerced into taking a solo bow, he turned his back to the audience and acknowledged the company, one artist saluting others.

 

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A review of the Bolshoi Ballet in "Onegin" by Ilona Landgraf in her blog, "Landgraf on Dance."

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I haven’t seen Lantratov often onstage but had the feeling he surpassed himself in the third act when Onegin tries to regain Tatiana. Where he had only raised an eyebrow or smiled a thin smile in the first act, every fiber of his body now expressed desperate pleading. Long stifled emotions erupted. He gestured soothingly with his hands, touched her tenderly, grasped her with passion, tried to hold her. Those two people had been destined for each other. Tragically, Onegin noticed too late. Lantratov took his curtain calls visibly touched.

 

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