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Friday, August 22


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#1 dirac

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Posted 22 August 2014 - 09:58 AM

A look at Giselles on YouTube by Alastair Macaulay in The New York Times.

 

 

All these ballerinas were considered definitive by different observers at the time. Watching, we can see not just what made them distinctive but also how “Giselle” itself has changed. YouTube also gives us Giselles before my time: Carla Fracci and Margot Fonteyn in the 1960s, Alicia Markova and Galina Ulanova in the 1950s and — without music but in live performance — Olga Spessivtseva in 1932. None of them dance it the way “Giselle” is performed today — and they’re remarkably unlike one another — and yet each of them leaps from the screen.

 



#2 dirac

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Posted 22 August 2014 - 10:11 AM

A review of several children's books with a dance theme by Jennifer B. McDonald in The New York Times Sunday Book Review.

 

 

On the more earnest end of the spectrum is “Deer Dancer,” written by Mary Lyn Ray and illustrated by Lauren Stringer. The book’s narrator is a pretty, nature-loving ballet student — gauzy pink skirt, Earth-print shirt, twigs tucked into a headband to form antlers — who struggles in the dance studio and so retreats to the woods, to practice in “a place I thought that no one knew — until the day a deer came.” Dancer and deer engage in a pas de deux of sorts: “He lowers his antlers in greeting. I lower mine. He starts to graze. And I begin to feel a song inside.”



#3 dirac

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Posted 22 August 2014 - 02:08 PM

Reviews of "Guys and Dolls" at Chichester, featuring Carlos Acosta's choreography.

 

 

.....Loesser also smuggled some slyly sexual lines past his times (Sarah's love-ballad "If I Were a Bell" is filled with images of slickness and opening) and Carlos Acosta, a choreographer known for erotic energy, creates routines that never forget that dance was a socially acceptable version of what guys and dolls really wanted to do.

 

The Daily Telegraph

 

 

The company also dance up a storm. Two choreographers are involved, the Cuban ballet star Carlos Acosta, who I would guess is responsible for the delirious rumba sequence when the action briefly relocates to Havana, and Andrew Wright. All the routines are blessed with exuberant energy and wit, not least the great Sit Down, You’re Rockin’ the Boat sequence, but I felt a bit short-changed that we were denied a full ensemble tap-dancing finale.



#4 dirac

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Posted 22 August 2014 - 02:10 PM

A review of Aspen Santa Fe Ballet at Jacob's Pillow by Janine Parker in The Boston Globe.

 

 

And this marvelous company, with its terrific dancers, is, 18 years later, an old master of the hybridization. The catch is that sometimes, as evidenced in the triple bill the company is presenting at Jacob’s Pillow this week (and like the group’s 2011 Pillow visit), the results can look like too much inbreeding. The individual dances are quite strong separately, but seen together they lose a good deal of specialness.



#5 dirac

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Posted 22 August 2014 - 02:12 PM

Michaela DePrince publishes a memoir.

 

 

With quite the resume and accolade, Michaela was featured in a 2012 doc First Position which followed her as she became a finalist at the Youth America Grand Prix in New York; was awarded a scholarship to The Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis School of the American Ballet Theatre in 2012; appeared on Dancing With the Stars, Good Morning America, Nightline, the BBC and other new programs; was named in the Huffington Post as one of their "18 Under 18: HuffPost Teen's List of the Most Amazing People of the Year" and was cited in Newsweek/The Daily Beast's "125 Women of Impact," to name a few.



#6 dirac

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Posted 22 August 2014 - 02:18 PM

A review of Aspen Santa Fe Ballet by Leslie Kandell in The Berkshire Eagle.

 

"Beautiful Mistake" was choreographed in 2013 by the Spanish-born Cayetano Soto, who wrote, "Unexpected things happen in the studio with the dance or the music and it’s a mistake. But the mistake is so beautiful that I need to use it." Not everyone was far enough into the piece to see where the mistakes were, but the dreary, noodling four-movement score by Icelandic composer Olafur Arnalds may have been one. Lighting was white against dark, the backdrop black with spotlights, and the loose-fitting legless garments were also by Joseph.

 

 

 

An interview with Tom Mossbrucker.

Each city has a ballet school, according to Mossbrucker, and in Santa Fe, Juan Siddi Flamenco Santa Fe, another dance company, now is under the company's umbrella. "We've known Juan for many, many years as an artist, and we decided to share our knowledge and management structure," Mossbrucker explained.

 

The company's 11 dancers -- 6 men, 5 women -- perform year-round in both cities, including "Nutcrackers" -- four performances in each city -- around the holidays: "The company dancers do the adult roles, and 15 professional dancers are engaged to supplement the company dancers, along with 80 children from each community," Mossbrucker said.

 



#7 dirac

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Posted 26 August 2014 - 05:28 PM

A preview of the fall season in dance by Allan Ulrich in The San Francisco Chronicle.

 

 

Australian Ballet: Conceived by former Artistic Director Graeme Murphy to celebrate the company’s 50th anniversary in 2002, this “Swan Lake” is not your conventional recounting of the Marius Petipa-Lev Ivanov classic. Recalling an episode in recent British history, this version gives us a prince torn between wife and true love. Nicolette Fraillon conducts members of the Berkeley Symphony in what remains of the Tchaikovsky score. Oct. 16-19. Zellerbach Hall, UC Berkeley.

 




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