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Thursday, August 21


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#1 dirac

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Posted 21 August 2014 - 04:22 PM

An interview with Wendy Whelan by Susan Reiter in Playbill.

 

 

She faced the inevitable competition—and frustration—for prominent roles. “I was really eager to make my mark, but it seemed to take a little while. But I’m glad things didn’t come as fast as I wanted them to, because it made me that much more ready—more capable, and more grateful when it did come.”

 

“And then it came really fast.”

 

 



#2 dirac

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Posted 21 August 2014 - 04:24 PM

A story on an exhibit featuring Diaghilev’s Ballet Russes at Tokyo's National Arts Center.

 

 

Mostly from the original productions from 1909-1929, this visual feast of elaborate gowns, tunics, jackets, pants, hats and accessories also includes numerous drawings, detailed sketches and photographs that impress the dedication and inventiveness of all the artists involved. Colorful silks, wools, cottons and rayon are embellished with imitation jewels, metallic braids and embroidery, or painstakingly pieced together into geometric patterns and hand painted with unusual designs.



#3 dirac

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Posted 21 August 2014 - 04:25 PM

A report from the Chicago Dancing Festival by Hedy Weiss in The Chicago Sun-Times blog.

 

 

The Joffrey Ballet was represented by way of a fiendishly difficult duet excerpted from Yuri Possokhov’s contemporary ballet, “The Bells,” set to music by Rachmaninoff (beautifully performed by pianist Mungunchimeg Buriad). Although this work often tries too hard to be both brash, and brashly modern, it marked the return to the stage of Victoria Jaiani (who is back in top form less than four months after giving birth to an apple-cheeked son), and her husband, Temur Suluashvili. These two are a stunning pair, and they carried off the duet’s complex, body-spiraling lifts with elan.



#4 dirac

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Posted 22 August 2014 - 02:06 PM

Carlos Acosta does the choreography for "Guys and Dolls" at the Chichester Festival.

 

 

Not only will it be the first time that Guys and Dolls has been staged at Chichester during its 52-year history, it will be the first musical to open in the Festival Theatre following its £22 million redevelopment. The musical also marks debuts at Chichester for director Gordon Greenberg and choreographer Carlos Acosta.

 

Interview with actor Jamie Parker.

 

 

 

What's it like working with choreographer Carlos Acosta?
I doubt I'll get to be in a rehearsal room with someone like Carlos Acosta again, he's an extraordinary specimen. It's just enlightening; it's a new experience, the sort of thing I've never seen before. The big dance sequence is the Havana sequence, where the dancers are working incredibly hard. I thank my stars that I don't really have to be a dancer, especially surrounded by the talent that I am. I'm sort of a two and a half threat rather than a triple threat.

 

Daily Mail review.

 

 

 

Yet the stage itself is frisky with movement. Carlos Acosta’s choreography has wit, variety. Nathan’s crap-shooting New York crowd is well drilled and includes a Harry the Horse (Nick Wilton) who cycles round disguised as a nun.

 

Broadway World review.

 

 

The dance numbers, of course, are tightly choreographed and beautifully executed - one suspects that the reliable hand of Andrew Wright kept a hand on the tiller while Carlos Acosta made his musical theatre choreographic debut, particularly with some innovation in the Havana scene.



#5 dirac

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Posted 22 August 2014 - 02:20 PM

Steven Heathcote returns to the Australian Ballet as ballet master and repetiteur.

Heathcote and McAllister both moved from Perth to Melbourne as teenagers to join the Australian Ballet School and spent their careers dancing alongside one another, before McAllister took over as artistic director in 2001.

 

“Everyone is thrilled to have him back. So many of the younger dancers started dancing because of Steven, particularly the young boys, so it’s really lovely having him here,” says McAllister, adding that Heathcote will also take over Radojevic’s role as director of AB’s regional touring arm, the Dancers Company.

 



#6 dirac

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Posted 22 August 2014 - 02:27 PM

An obituary for Australian composer Peter Sculthorpe, who has died at age 85.

 

 

When, in 1966, he was commissioned to write his first Sun Music for the Sydney Symphony Orchestra, he set himself the task of producing a work devoid of melody, in which, as one newspaper put it, he laid the foundations of an original and characteristic Australian music. The score was later choreographed by Robert Helpmann for the Australian Ballet. Though in Britain he studied with Edmund Rubbra and Egon Wellesz at Oxford, his inspiration was fundamentally Australian - Aboriginal music, he declared, was the oldest music on the planet - and he believed the musical future lay in the Southern Hemisphere, and not in Europe. It prompted him to use ancient Australian instruments in his works and to curb his early enthusiasm for Bartok and other key European composers.

 



#7 dirac

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Posted 25 August 2014 - 05:06 PM

A review of Stephen Lloyd's new biography of Constant Lambert by Paul Arrowsmith for DanceTabs.

 

Recognising talent when she saw it, in typical cherry-picking style, Ninette de Valois recruited Lambert to orchestrate Mozart’s Les petits riens for her Vic-Wells group, the only time that Lambert would allow a Mozart score to be used for dance. He developed a strong friendship and working relationship with Ashton. Not only did the choreographer regard him as his musical mentor, he recognised that Lambert was an expert in painting, literature – everything. The foundations for what became The Royal Ballet were being laid.

 

 

 



#8 dirac

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Posted 27 August 2014 - 10:19 AM

A review of the Marriott Theatre’s production of “On the Town” for Broadway World.

 

Choreographer Alex Sanchez (winner of the BroadwayWorld Chicago Award for "Follies" at Chicago Shakespeare Theater) has done remarkable work here, shaping the cityscapes and scenes of hustle and bustle, jitterbug exuberance and athletic leaps with precision, clarity and (to be honest) fairness, as the 360-degree stage is not always deferential to a choreographer's demands. Those who have any interest at all in the ways musical theater can use dance to further the story would be well served to buy multiple tickets right now, to see these artists in top form.

 




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