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Monday, August 11


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#1 dirac

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Posted 11 August 2014 - 07:18 AM

Reviews of the Mariinsky Ballet.

 

The Guardian

 

But design apart, this 1962 ballet is not among Balanchine's finest. It's a full-length Dream, padding out the familiar Mendelssohn score with additional musical extracts. And while it follows Shakespeare's play more faithfully than Ashton, it delivers a fraction of the latter's humane sweetness and jokes. The result is a generic story ballet, disappointingly lacking in Balanchine's sharpest choreographic invention.

 

 

 

The Independent

After the modernism of Apollo, Balanchine’s 1962 A Midsummer Night’s Dream seems wispily retro, with a story told in rambling, repetitive mime.

 

The best bit is the gorgeous duet that pops up in the divertissement, entirely unrelated to the plot. Kimin Kim and Nadezhda Batoeva are radiant in the floating lifts and dreamy phrasing.

 

 

The Arts Desk

 

.... First, though, is her stately duet with an anonymous Cavalier. When performed, as many Titanias do, with queenly hauteur, ignoring their servile porteur, it can be a starchy affair. Lopatkina, though, made it a deliciously warm conversation with a dinner guest, here Andrei Yermakov - not flirtatious exactly, but a reminder that these are adults, that this parade of arabesques and promenades is the equivalent of a formal discourse within which smiling glances may show pleasure in the other person's company. To see such a sophisticated, glorious creature utterly infatuated with a donkey minutes later was all the more painfully funny.

 

 

DanceTabs

Act 2 is purely classical – a sparkling divertissement à la Balanchine to Mendelssohn’s String Symphony No.9 in C major, which shimmers with beautiful movement. The leading couple for this performance was Oxana Skorik and Konstantin Zverev. She has clarity and exuberance in her dancing, and her pliable back and open épaulement give her grace and refinement. Zverev possesses a noble demeanour and was a careful partner, setting Skorik gently on pointe in the many lifts, and demonstrating elegant beats and leaps.

 

 



#2 dirac

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Posted 11 August 2014 - 09:34 AM

Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre will present Lew Christensen's "Beauty and the Beast."

The grant enabled the ballet to acquire the production including full sets and costuming. Additional support from presenting sponsor PNC Bank will allow Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre to stage the ballet for future seasons.

 



#3 dirac

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Posted 11 August 2014 - 09:35 AM

Ballet Manila's nineteenth season gets underway.

 

 

 

Prima ballerina Lisa Macuja-Elizalde, Ballet Manila artistic director, said while the company is known for classical ballet presentations, they also want to keep introducing contemporary pieces by in-house talents and international choreographers.

“We will always perform traditional favorites because it’s the foundation of Ballet Manila and that’s what our audience will look for. But at the same time, we want to showcase our versatility by highlighting a range of new pieces,” Macuja-Elizalde says.



#4 dirac

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Posted 11 August 2014 - 09:40 AM

A review of the Mariinsky's Balanchine program by Clement Crisp in The Financial Times.

 

 

 


My somewhat brief comments on Dream are dictated by a need to offer laurels for the performance of Kristina Shapran as Terpsichore in Apollo. I am not given to falling in love with dancers’ artistry – notwithstanding my recent joy in Olga Smirnova’s great talent. But with Kristina Shapran – set against Vladimir Shklyarov’s grandly drawn Apollo – I saw dancing of astonishing promise. That she is young, has exquisite feet, an ideal physique, is musically alert and technically assured, we might (perhaps, perhaps!) take for granted in a debutante Mariinsky soloist.



#5 dirac

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Posted 13 August 2014 - 05:45 AM

Carlos Acosta is talking about starting a new Cuban dance troupe.

 

 

The dancer earlier toyed with the idea of rescuing the ruins of Havana's crumbling dance school and turning it into an international center for culture and dance.

 



#6 dirac

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Posted 13 August 2014 - 05:53 AM

A review of the Mariinsky in London by Roslyn Sulcas in The New York Times.

 

 

A very different reading was offered on Saturday afternoon by Xander Parish, a former Royal Ballet corps dancer who joined the Mariinsky four years ago, and is now a second soloist (two rungs under principal) with the company. He has also danced Romeo and Prince Siegfried this season, and his ascent has been hailed by the British critics with patriotic pride. (And a hint of schadenfreude as they reflect on how his talent was spotted by the Mariinsky deputy director Yuri Fateyev, while remaining unnoticed at home.)



#7 dirac

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Posted 13 August 2014 - 05:56 AM

An interview with Savannah Ballet Theatre's new ballet master, Benjamin Westafer.

 

 

 

Early on, Westafer knew he wanted to dance professionally.

“I was fortunate to grow up as ballet was enjoying a renaissance,” he says. “Nureyev paved the way but when I saw ‘The Turning Point’ and Baryshnikov’s variation from ‘Le Corsaire,’ I was hooked.



#8 dirac

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Posted 19 August 2014 - 12:05 PM

A review of the Bolshoi Ballet in New York by Sophie Flack in The Weekly Standard.

 

 

In the opening court scene, David Hallberg was convincing as royalty. It was a wonderful showcase for his virtuosic technique, his long, lean line, and his pure, clean movement. As he executed difficult jump sequences, his hips and sternum remained fixed, giving the audience a pleasing sense of calmness. Hallberg is a nuanced actor, and you could follow the story just by watching him from the neck up. His ease and humility might not arouse the kind of enthusiasm from the audience that a dancer with more bravura or charisma would, but he is more subtle and restrained than some of his Russian colleagues.




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