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Friday, August 1


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10 replies to this topic

#1 dirac

dirac

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Posted 03 August 2014 - 10:18 PM

Misty Copeland becomes the face of Under Armour's line of women's apparel.

"Gilda and I coming together couldn't have been more perfect," Copeland says. "One of her visions was to have me being seen as not just a ballerina, but the athlete that I am. Under Armour is a brand that takes chances and had the mission to promote people who had struggles but persevered while not conforming to the typical mold."

 

In the Under Armour spot, a young girl voices the words of a rejection letter as Copeland cuts the air with her moves. The payoff comes at the end, when words on the screen tell the viewer that Copeland is in fact a soloist for the American Ballet Theatre.

 

 



#2 dirac

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Posted 03 August 2014 - 10:20 PM

A feature on Dane Shitagi's series of photographs, "The Ballerina Project."

 

Shitagi's subjects move with elegance and grace through natural landscapes and city streets, every unexpected stage further inspiring us less-flexible folks to turn every step into a sashay. Whether stretching in the sand or greeting the oncoming subway with an arabesque, the following ballerinas are making us desperately wish we could bend like that.

 

 



#3 dirac

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Posted 03 August 2014 - 10:23 PM

A review of the Mariinsky Ballet by Neil Norman in The Daily Express.

Lavrovsky’s choreography has its moments, however, especially in the bright solos for Mercutio and Juliet, though the ensemble dances are riddled with folksy repetition and he does almost nothing with the grand ball scene beyond having couples walk up and down in unison.

 

Thank goodness for the luminous presence of Anastasia Matvienko, a first soloist who is one of several Juliets in the present run. From the moment she leaps across the stage to tease her nurse she exudes a lithe, expressive quality that is immensely attractive.

 



#4 dirac

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Posted 03 August 2014 - 10:28 PM

Reviews of the BalletBoyz.

 

The Independent

With musicians from the BBC Concert Orchestra, it’s a showcase for the all-male company’s mix of testosterone and poise.

 

Young Men, choreographed by Iván Pérez, is inspired by the First World War. This first glimpse starts with the Boyz in stylised uniform. It’s still a work in progress, but the best moments find a line between brutality and tenderness.

 

 

The Arts Desk

The most strikingly pliant dancer is Edward Pearce, whose neck and back can make curves as effortless and elegant as a Chinese calligrapher’s brush strokes. His arresting physical qualities become a focal point for a long sequence in Pérez’s Young Men, a full-length work about the First World War which will première at Sadler’s Wells in January 2015. There’s an “over the top” section (set against video projections of blasted tree trunks) in which Pérez sets the running and falling of the other men, “dying” over and over, with a near-naked Pearce, who quivering and vulnerable, struggles to walk: an effective juxtaposition of mass, mechanical carnage with the damage wrought on individuals by its horrors

 



#5 dirac

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Posted 03 August 2014 - 10:34 PM

Photographs of Cuba's National Ballet School.

 

In Cuba, ballet is a matter of national pride—not simply one of the higher art forms for an elite few. Tickets are affordable, and ballet is popular and accessible. In a 2011 interview with The New York Times, famed Russian ballet dancer Mikhail Baryshnikov said about Cuba, “there, every taxi driver knows the names of the dancers. This is unheard of. Try it in New York.”  In 2012, photographer Rebekah Bowman managed to get rare access to the birthplace of the top male ballet dancers and prima ballerinas of Cuba, the famed National Ballet School in Havana.

 



#6 dirac

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Posted 03 August 2014 - 10:37 PM

Q&A with Misty Copeland about the gig with Under Armour.

 

theFashionSpot: Tell us a little bit about what inspired you to get involved with this campaign.

 

Misty Copeland: Everything that Under Armour stands for, and the feeling that these athletes are underdogs for whatever reason. Even a brand that was this small, competing with these massive brands who already had such superstar athletes — I feel like everything they stood for, being so fierce and the passion and beating the odds for whatever it is you’re going through in your different genre of sport or art — it just really spoke to me as an individual. You can be different, look different and succeed, become the new face of whatever it is you’re doing.

 



#7 dirac

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Posted 04 August 2014 - 10:08 AM

An essay on crimes of passion in dance by Sarah Kaufman in The Washington Post.

 

What’s interesting is that in digging into an American tragedy, “Fall River Legend” became part of a great American victory. De Mille’s style is part streamlined ballet, part hard-bodied tension of the kind Martha Graham favored, and part exuberant musical theater. This amalgam typified the revolution that was going on in ballet at the time. The big news was that European dominance was out, and that American stories and American ways of telling them were in.

 

 



#8 dirac

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Posted 04 August 2014 - 10:15 AM

A review of Dance Theatre of Harlem by Gia Kourlas in The New York Times.

Amid swirls of fog and posturing, Mr. Byrd’s choreographic tools are standard for contemporary solos and duets: slicing legs and arms; whipping turns, which frequently end with a dancer’s falling out of a pirouette rather than stopping with control; and rampant emotional disconnection. What does “Contested Space” say about Dance Theater? It could be any repertory company.

 

Fortunately, the program ended with a ballet that pays homage to Dance Theater’s roots: Robert Garland’s masterly “Return.” In this 1999 work, Mr. Garland fuses ballet technique with black vernacular dance, or, as he puts it in a program note, “postmodern urban neo-classicism.”

 



#9 dirac

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Posted 05 August 2014 - 09:15 AM

A  feature on the special task of dance conductors by Marina Harss in The New York Times.

 

“Dance is a completely different language from music,” Martin West, the music director and principal conductor of the San Francisco Ballet, recently pointed out in a phone conversation, so “the players are totally reliant on me to interpret what is happening onstage.” Otherwise, the musicians become disconnected; the electricity disappears. (Discreet amplification in the wings also helps the dancers hear what is going on beneath them.)

 

 



#10 dirac

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Posted 05 August 2014 - 11:26 AM

Dancers from the Paris Opera Ballet visit the area around the site of the Fukushima nuclear plant disaster.

 

The troupe of about 10 dancers gave dozens of students advice on their technique and offered moral support as the youngsters try to return to a normal life after the worst atomic crisis in a generation.

 

“Today I learned where to put my hands when I’m turning and how to express myself through movement,” smiled 12-year-old Moyu Sakai, a student at the Hitomi Takeuchi Ballet School in Fukushima city, about 60 km from the plant.

 



#11 dirac

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Posted 11 August 2014 - 09:48 AM

Video of Carlos Acosta rehearsing "Guys and Dolls."

The lively ensemble is directed by American Gordon Greenberg (a former actor and theatre star himself), who is also developing the Disney film Tangled into a stage musical. Greenberg’s previous work has been noted for its clever and richly animated direction. Here he speaks fondly of Acosta, saying:

 

“He’s a man of great vision and integrity. He’s made for musicals – he has it in his bones.”

 




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